Calendar

Jun
24
Mon
Carl Frey: The Technology trap: Capital, labour and power in the age of automation @ Resolution Foundation offices
Jun 24 @ 6:00 pm – 7:15 pm

Book launch for ‘The Technology Trap’ by Carl Frey, with response from Diane Coyle

Monday 24 June, 6-7.15pm, Resolution Foundation offices, Westminster

 

In the long run, rising living standards are driven by productivity improvements. But people don’t live in the long run. While technological innovations can boost output and living standards, they can also disrupt labour markets and shift power balances both between new and established firms, and between capital and labour.

In a critically-acclaimed new book, economist Carl Frey examines the impact of technological change on the world of work and the wider economy over the last 800 years, and then considers what the age of automation might mean for the future of work.

The Resolution Foundation is hosting an event at its Westminster headquarters to launch the book. We will hear from author Carl Frey on the key insights from the book, before a response from Diane Coyle, one of the UK’s leading economists. Both will then take part in an audience Q&A, chaired by RF Chief Executive Torsten Bell.

 

Speakers

Carl Frey, co-director of the Oxford Martin Programme on Technology and Employment, University of Oxford

Diane Coyle, Bennett Professor of Public Policy, University of Cambridge

Torsten Bell, Chief Executive of the Resolution Foundation (Chair)

Jun
25
Tue
John Quiggin – Economics in Two Lessons @ Avid Reader Bookshop
Jun 25 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

John Quiggin – Economics in Two Lessons

Tuesday 25 June 2019
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM
In store at Avid Reader Bookshop
Ticket $10.00, Book (Economics in Two Lessons : Why Markets Work So Well and Why They Can Fail So Badly) $29.99
Tickets available until 25 June 2019 6:00 PM

This event commences at 6.30pm. Printed tickets are not issued and your booking will be on a door list under your surname.

A masterful introduction to the key ideas behind the successes – and failures – of free-market economics.

ABC Radio National’s Paul Barclay is in-conversation with John Quiggin discussing Economics in Two Lessons: Why Markets Work So Well and Why They Can Fail So Badly.

Since 1946, Henry Hazlitt’s bestselling Economics in One Lesson has popularized the belief that economics can be boiled down to one simple lesson: market prices represent the true cost of everything. But one-lesson economics tells only half the story. It can explain why markets often work so well, but it can’t explain why they often fail so badly—or what we should do when they stumble. As Nobel Prize–winning economist Paul Samuelson quipped, “When someone preaches ‘Economics in one lesson,’ I advise: Go back for the second lesson.” In Economics in Two Lessons, John Quiggin teaches both lessons, offering a masterful introduction to the key ideas behind the successes—and failures—of free markets.

Economics in Two Lessons explains why market prices often fail to reflect the full cost of our choices to society as a whole. For example, every time we drive a car, fly in a plane, or flick a light switch, we contribute to global warming. But, in the absence of a price on carbon emissions, the costs of our actions are borne by everyone else. In such cases, government action is needed to achieve better outcomes.

Two-lesson economics means giving up the dogmatism of laissez-faire as well as the reflexive assumption that any economic problem can be solved by government action, since the right answer often involves a mixture of market forces and government policy. But the payoff is huge: understanding how markets actually work—and what to do when they don’t.

Brilliantly accessible, Economics in Two Lessons unlocks the essential issues at the heart of any economic question.

John Quiggin is the President’s Senior Fellow in Economics at the University of Queensland. His previous book, Zombie Economics: How Dead Ideas Still Walk Among Us, has been translated into eight languages. He has written for the New York Times and the Economist, among other publications, and is a frequent blogger for Crooked Timber and on his own website: www.johnquiggin.com. Twitter @JohnQuiggin

Carl Benedikt Frey: Author series – The Technology Trap @ Farmers & Fletchers, 3 Cloth Street
Jun 25 @ 6:30 pm – 7:30 pm

From the Industrial Revolution to the age of artificial intelligence, The Technology Trap by Carl Benedikt Frey, takes a sweeping look at the history of technological progress and how it has radically shifted the distribution of economic and political power among society’s members.

Carl will discuss how the Industrial Revolution created unprecedented wealth and prosperity over the long run, but the immediate consequences of mechanisation were devastating for large swaths of the population. In his book, he states that middle-income jobs withered, wages stagnated, the labour share of income fell, profits surged, and economic inequality skyrocketed. These trends, he documents, broadly mirror those in our current age of automation, which began with the computer revolution.

Just as the Industrial Revolution eventually brought about extraordinary benefits for society, Carl will discuss how artificial intelligence systems have the potential to do the same but that this depends on how the short term is managed.

The Industrial Revolution was a defining moment in history, but few grasped its enormous consequences at the time. The Technology Trap demonstrates that in the midst of another technological revolution, the lessons of the past can help us to more effectively face the present.

This event has been organised by the Author Series working group.

Please note if you require special assistance or have specific access requirements, please contact the events team at events@cfauk.org.

Speakers
Carl Benedikt Frey 
Economist and Economic Historian

Carl Benedikt Frey is the Oxford Martin Citi fellow and co-director of the Oxford Martin Programme on technology and employment at the Oxford Martin School, University of Oxford. He is also a senior fellow at the Institute for New Economic Thinking at Oxford and in the department of economic history at Lund University.

His research focuses the transition of industrial nations to digital economies, and subsequent challenges for economic growth, labour markets and urban development.

His work has been widely covered by the BBC, CNN, The Economist, Financial Times, Wall Street Journal, Foreign Affairs, New York Times, Washington Post, Der Spiegel, Scientific American, TIME Magazine, Forbes,and many others.

Book Launch Party – DIGITAL CASH by Finn Brunton @ Internet Archive
Jun 25 @ 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Please join us for the launch of DIGITAL CASH: The Unknown History of the Anarchists, Utopians, and Technologists Who Created Cryptocurrency. Programming will begin at 6:30p in the Internet Archive’s Great Room, followed by a reception and book signing. Books will be available for sale onsite.

In DIGITAL CASH (publishing June 25, 2019), Finn Brunton reveals how, since the 1920s, technological utopians and political radicals have turned to experimental money as they key to realizing their visions for the future: protecting privacy, bringing down governments, preparing for apocalypse, and launching a civilization of innovation and abundance that would make its creators immortal. This incredible story of the pioneers of cryptocurrency takes us from autonomous zones on the high seas to the world’s most valuable dump, from bank runs to idea coupons, from time travelers in a San Francisco bar to the pattern securing every twenty-dollar bill, and from marketplaces for dangerous secrets to a tank of frozen heads in Scottsdale, Arizona.

Time
Doors Open: 6:00 PM
In Conversation with Finn Brunton: 6:30 – 7:45 PM
Reception: 7:45 – 9:00 PM

Light refreshments will be served. Finn Brunton’s book will also be available for purchase and signing during the reception.

About the Author

Finn Brunton (finnb.net) is the author of Spam: A Shadow History of the Internet (2013) and Digital Cash: The Unknown History of the Anarchists, Technologists, and Utopians Who Created Cryptocurrency (2019), and the co-author of Obfuscation: A User’s Guide for Privacy and Protest (2015) and Communication (2019). He teaches in Media, Culture, and Communication at New York University.

 

The Internet Archive is located within 1-2 blocks of the following MUNI lines: 1 California, 2 Clement, 28 19th Ave and 38 Geary. There is also a paid parking lot at the Ross Dress-for-Less on Geary @ 16th ave.

Street parking in the neighborhood surrounding the Archive is free after 6pm. Please allow some additional time to find parking.

Jun
27
Thu
John Quiggin – Economics in Two Lessons, in conversation with Peter Martin @ Gleebooks
Jun 27 @ 6:30 pm

A masterful introduction to the key ideas behind the successes and failures of free-market economics.
Since 1946, Henry Hazlitt’s bestselling Economics in One Lesson has popularized the belief that economics can be boiled down to one simple lesson: market prices represent the true cost of everything. But one-lesson economics tells only half the story. It can explain why markets often work so well, but it can’t explain why they often fail so badly—or what we should do when they stumble. As Nobel Prize-winning economist Paul Samuelson quipped, “When someone preaches ‘Economics in one lesson,’ I advise: Go back for the second lesson.” In Economics in Two Lessons, John Quiggin teaches both lessons, offering a masterful introduction to the key ideas behind the successes—and failures—of free markets.

Economics in Two Lessons explains why market prices often fail to reflect the full cost of our choices to society as a whole. For example, every time we drive a car, fly in a plane, or flick a light switch, we contribute to global warming. But, in the absence of a price on carbon emissions, the costs of our actions are borne by everyone else. In such cases, government action is needed to achieve better outcomes.

Two-lesson economics means giving up the dogmatism of laissez-faire as well as the reflexive assumption that any economic problem can be solved by government action, since the right answer often involves a mixture of market forces and government policy. But the payoff is huge: understanding how markets actually work’and what to do when they don’t.

Brilliantly accessible, Economics in Two Lessons unlocks the essential issues at the heart of any economic question.

Jun
28
Fri
Book Launch & Discussion: Ottoman Baroque: The Architectural Refashioning of Eighteenth-Century Istanbul @ Royal Asiatic Society Lecture Theatre
Jun 28 @ 6:00 pm – 8:30 pm

On Friday June 28th The Royal Asiatic Society will host a joint book launch of Ünver Rüstem’s Ottoman Baroque: The Architectural Refashioning of Eighteenth-Century Istanbul and Chanchal B. Dadlani’s From Stone to Paper: Architecture as History in the Late Mughal Empire. Chairing the discussion will be Dr. Sussan Babaie (Andrew W. Mellon Reader in the Arts of Iran and Islam, The Courtauld Institute of Art).

With its idiosyncratic yet unmistakable adaptation of European Baroque models, the eighteenth-century architecture of Istanbul has frequently been dismissed by modern observers as inauthentic and derivative, a view reflecting broader unease with notions of Western influence on Islamic cultures. In Ottoman Baroque—the first English-language book on the topic—Ünver Rüstem provides a compelling reassessment of this building style and shows how between 1740 and 1800 the Ottomans consciously coopted European forms to craft a new, politically charged, and globally resonant image for their empire’s capital.

 

Rüstem reclaims the label “Ottoman Baroque” as a productive framework for exploring the connectedness of Istanbul’s eighteenth-century buildings to other traditions of the period. Using a wealth of primary sources, he demonstrates that this architecture was in its own day lauded by Ottomans and foreigners alike for its fresh, cosmopolitan effect. Purposefully and creatively assimilated, the style’s cross-cultural borrowings were combined with Byzantine references that asserted the Ottomans’ entitlement to the Classical artistic heritage of Europe. Such aesthetic rebranding was part of a larger endeavor to reaffirm the empire’s power at a time of intensified East-West contact, taking its boldest shape in a series of imperial mosques built across the city as landmarks of a state-sponsored idiom.

 

Copiously illustrated and drawing on previously unpublished documents, Ottoman Baroquebreaks new ground in our understanding of Islamic visual culture in the modern era and offers a persuasive counterpoint to Eurocentric accounts of global art history.

 

Reviews

Ottoman Baroque takes a reflective and fine-grained look at a major stylistic turn in Ottoman architecture that has previously been dismissed and misunderstood in modern scholarship. Ünver Rüstem boldly reclaims the topic with an alternative and highly original critical perspective.”—Ahmet Ersoy, Boğaziçi University

“Ünver Rüstem’s book offers a highly original mapping of local and foreign perceptions of the Ottoman Baroque’s aesthetic syncretism. By attending to the changing architectural ambitions of imperial mosque construction in the Ottoman capital, Istanbul, Rüstem’s study deftly navigates this period of robust artistic dialogue and cross-cultural transfer. Historiographically attuned, visually compelling, and thoughtfully written, this is a must-read for anyone engaged with the global Baroque.”—Mary Roberts, The University of Sydney

 

Bio

Ünver Rüstem is Assistant Professor of Islamic Art and Architecture at Johns Hopkins University. His research centers on the Ottoman Empire in its later centuries and on questions of cross-cultural exchange and interaction. He received his PhD from Harvard University and has held fellowships at Columbia University, the University of Cambridge, and Harvard University. In addition to his new book, he has published articles and chapters on subjects ranging from the reception of illustrated Islamic manuscripts to the symbolic deployment of ceremonial in the context of Ottoman architecture. At present, he is working on a new book project that explores the role of costume in Ottoman interactions with Western Europe during the early modern and modern periods.

Rob Reich: Philanthropy, Democracy, and You @ Aspen Ideas Festival
Jun 28 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Rob Reich is a professor of political science and, by courtesy, professor of philosophy at the Graduate School of Education at Stanford University, where he directs the Center for Ethics in Society, co-directs the Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society, and is associate director of the Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence initiative. Focusing his work on ethics, public policy, and technology, Reich most recently authored Just Giving: Why Philanthropy is Failing Democracy and How It Can Do Better. A former sixth-grade teacher, he has received multiple teaching awards, including the Walter J. Gores Award. Reich serves on the boards of Boston Review magazine and the Spencer Foundation.

Jun
29
Sat
Marion Turner at Biennial London Chaucer Conference 2019 @ Biennial London Chaucer Conference 2019, St Bride's Church, Fleet Street,
Jun 29 @ 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm

BIENNIAL LONDON CHAUCER CONFERENCE: CHAUCER AND EUROPE

Hosted by the Institute of English Studies, School of Advanced Study, University of London
Sponsored by the New Chaucer Society

The Biennial London Chaucer Conference 2019 will be centered around ‘Chaucer and Europe’. Papers will primarily address issues relating to Europe and its influences, ideas, and traditions in the age of Chaucer and his contemporaries, or in later works which engage with Chaucer’s literary afterlife. The conference aims to explore not only how the works of such great European writers as Dante, Boccaccio, Machaut, and Froissart influenced Chaucer and his contemporaries, but also how European literary traditions, forms, and styles informed the literature produced in England during the later Middle Ages. The conference also welcomes papers which explore, or engage creatively, with ideas of place, travel, and commerce in Europe, as well as issues of identity (regional, national, and international), otherness, and borders and boundaries. Interdisciplinary topics and approaches are most welcome as the conference hopes to bring together scholars and postgraduate students working in a range of disciplines and departments.

SATURDAY 29th JUNE 2019

17.00-18.00 – Plenary Lecture Bridewell Hall
Chair: Alastair Bennett (Royal Holloway, University of London)
Marion Turner (University of Oxford): ‘Chaucer: A European Life’

 

Jul
2
Tue
Japanese Tales of Lafcadio Hearn: Andrei Codrescu and Sean Cole @ McNally Jackson
Jul 2 @ 7:00 pm

Japanese Tales of Lafcadio Hearn is a collection of 28 strange, ghost stories written by Hearn. Hearn was one of the nineteenth century’s best-known writers, his name celebrated alongside those of Mark Twain and Robert Louis Stevenson. He worked as a reporter in Cincinnati, New Orleans, and the West Indies before heading to Japan in 1890 on a commission from Harper’s. There, he married a Japanese woman from a samurai family, changed his name to Koizumi Yakumo, and became a Japanese subject. An avid collector of traditional Japanese tales, legends, and myths, Hearn taught literature and wrote his own tales for both Japanese and Western audiences. His Japanese tales have been most famously turned into the film, Kwaidan (1965), directed by Masaki Kobayashi.

Andrei Codrescu is a poet, novelist, essayist, and NPR commentator. His many books include Whatever Gets You through the NightThe Postmodern Dada Guide, and The Poetry Lesson.

Sean Cole is a producer, reporter and occasional guest host for This American Life. He’s worked in public radio for more than 20 years — also as a producer for Radiolab, a reporter for Marketplace and a contributor for many other programs and podcasts including 99% Invisible, Studio 360, and Only a Game. His poetry collections include The December Projectpublished by Boog Literature, Itty City by Pressed Wafer and One Train on Dusie press.

Oct
3
Thu
Global History Workshop – A World Divided by Eric D. Weitz @ 210 Dickinson Hall, Princeton University
Oct 3 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

This workshop will focus on Prof. Weitz’s forthcoming book, A World Divided The Global Struggle for Human Rights in the Age of Nation-States (link is external)(Princeton University Press, September 2019).

About A World Divided:

A global history of human rights in a world of nation-states that grant rights to some while denying them to others

Once dominated by vast empires, the world is now divided into close to 200 independent countries with laws and constitutions proclaiming human rights—a transformation that suggests that nations and human rights inevitably developed together. But the reality is far more problematic, as Eric Weitz shows in this compelling global history of the fate of human rights in a world of nation-states.

Through vivid histories drawn from virtually every continent, A World Divideddescribes how, since the eighteenth century, nationalists have struggled to establish their own states that grant human rights to some people. At the same time, they have excluded others through forced assimilation, ethnic cleansing, or even genocide. From Greek rebels, American settlers, and Brazilian abolitionists in the nineteenth century to anticolonial Africans and Zionists in the twentieth, nationalists have confronted the question, Who has the “right to have rights?” A World Divided tells these stories in colorful accounts focusing on people who were at the center of events. And it shows that rights are dynamic. Proclaimed originally for propertied white men, rights were quickly demanded by others, including women, American Indians, and black slaves.

A World Divided also explains the origins of many of today’s crises, from the existence of more than 65 million refugees and migrants worldwide to the growth of right-wing nationalism. The book argues that only the continual advance of international human rights will move us beyond the quandary of a world divided between those who have rights and those who don’t.


Eric D. Weitz is Distinguished Professor of History at City College and the Graduate Center, City University of New York. His books include Weimar Germany: Promise and Tragedy and A Century of Genocide. He lives in Princeton and New York City.