Migration Quiz Monday: It’s a Feathered Frenzy!

Stephenson_WarblerGGreetings bird-lovers! I know technically it’s Thursday (Happy Thanksgiving and first day of Hanukkah by the way!), but today is our ultimate Migration Quiz Monday! Our favorite warblers experts, Tom Stephenson and Scott Whittle, authors of The Warbler Guide, have been incredibly busy touring for their book and attending birding festivals, while still trying to fit in their favorite pastime, birding!

They finally got a chance to post a slew of quiz questions and answers on their blog a few days ago, but rather than posting each one and crowding up your nest- I mean computer screen- with links and posts and bird puns, I thought it would be easier if I gave you just one simple link to click on and check out all of their quizzes at once at The Warbler Guide.com. Enjoy!


And to check out the free downloads we’re currently offering, check out the links below:
Crossley ID Guide Raptors : A sampler raptor guide in PDF format including photos and real text from the guide
Quick Finders from The Warbler Guide : A ‘quick finder’ designed to help you identify over 50 warblers faster with targeted color photos


Migration Quiz Monday: The Swamp Answer

Ready for the big reveal? It’s time to find out where Scott Whittle and Tom Stephenson, co-authors of The Warbler Guide, found this bird call, and which of our three winged options it came from.


Audio Quiz: Swamp Answer

Click Here To Listen

QUIZ SONG – ONE SECTION OF REPEATED, 4-ELEMENT PHRASES – PITCH MOVES IN ONE DIRECTION.

So this is a 1-Section song. It consists of one Phrase that is repeated over and over. (A Phrase is a group of different Elements that are repeated several times.) The Phrase is intricate, with 4 Elements.

Notice that each Phrase covers a lot of frequencies, including some that are very low. The first Element of each Phrase looks like a very straight line. This indicates many frequencies being sung at the same time, creating a very strong accent or even noise-like sound. The Elements in the rest of the Phrase sound staccato, as they are short, and have a much smaller pitch range.  And they rise in pitch, one to the next.

All of the suggested species share this same basic structure: 1 Section with several repeated Phrases, each of which consists of a few Elements. Let’s first look at Kentucky Warbler and see if it fits.

Click Here To Listen

KENTUCKY WARBLER: THE ELEMENTS ARE LOW AND COMPRESSED IN PITCH RANGE.

The first thing we hear (and see) is that all of these Elements are very similar to each other. There is nothing like the variety of sound we hear in the target song. Also, the pitch is low and doesn’t cover nearly the same range, making the song sound duller and less strident.

Common Yellowthroat’s song does have a lot of variety in its Elements.

Click Here To Listen

COMMON YELLOWTHROAT: LESS ACCENTED, SLOWER, AND HIGHER, WITH UP/DOWN PITCH MOVEMENTS.

And it covers a very wide range of frequencies, although it doesn’t go nearly as low as the target song. Also, the Elements are somewhat longer, and thus sound less staccato or accented. The speed of the Phrases is also noticeably slower, in fact about half as fast. That enhances the more melodic quality of the Common Yellowthroat’s song.

Finally the pitch profile of each Phrase is a slower, more gentle, up/down form. All in all, Common Yellowthroat sounds more mellow or sing-songy than the target song, which has a very strong accent followed by a rapidly rising series of short Elements.

All of the features of the target song fit the various, variable songs of Carolina Wren. The key to identifying this species, and separating it from other species, is each Phrase’s very fast, sharp, accented Element that is then followed by a series of short Elements with either a rising or falling overall pitch profile. The fairly fast speed and wide pitch range, adds to the song’s effect.


And to check out the free downloads we’re currently offering, check out the links below:
Crossley ID Guide Raptors : A sampler raptor guide in PDF format
Quick Finders from The Warbler Guide : A ‘quick finder’ designed to help you identify over 50 warblers faster with targeted color photos.

Migration Quiz Monday: The Swamp Question

After a short hiatus, we’re back with Migration Quiz Monday! Hope you don’t get too stumped by this birdcall, along with a couple distinguishing features. Have a guess? Comment below and check back later this week for the answer!


Audio Quiz: Swamp Question

carwre quiz fin

Click Here To Listen

This species is a very vocal singer, has many variations, and is often confused with other species, especially from the distance. This one Section song could be Common Yellowthroat, Kentucky Warbler or even Carolina Wren. Which is it?

COMYEL_042608#2KENWAR100422_35CARWRE_022009#10

(click to enlarge)


And to check out the free downloads we’re currently offering, check out the links below:
Crossley ID Guide Raptors : A sampler raptor guide in PDF format
Quick Finders from The Warbler Guide : A ‘quick finder’ designed to help you identify over 50 warblers faster with targeted color photos.

Solution for Week Two Migration Quiz Monday

Visual Quiz: Bird On The Ground Answered

Ready to find out the solution to this week’s Migration Quiz Monday from the authors who brought us The Warbler Guide? Then read on below!

bird1

OUR QUIZ BIRD

Let’s look at the Warbler Guide Finders to narrow this one down.  There are a number of birds with yellow in them…let’s see if there are any other features we can find that will help us narrow it down.

bir

THE FINDERS SHOW A NUMBER OF YELLOW BIRDS – WHAT ELSE CAN WE LOOK FOR?

Let’s work from head to tail … on the head we see a pronounced supercillium (eyebrow)…that should be helpful!  There’s a tinge of brown on the crown, too.  The upperparts of the back are brownish – and look at those wings…there are wingbars but they’re brown, which might be another useful point.  The underparts are patchy yellow, and the rump and undertail are yellow (brighter in the undertail).
bird

SOME USEFUL MARKS INCLUDE A WIDE SUPERCILLIUM, BROWN IN THE CROWN AND WINGS, BROWNISH WING BARS, PATCHY YELLOW IN THE BODY, AND A YELLOW RUMP AND UNDERTAIL.

So let’s look again at the finders…there really aren’t that many birds that are drabish yellow with a strong supercillium.  I see Palm, Prairie, Hooded, Tennessee, Orange-crowned, Blackburnian, Worm-eating, Swainsons, Blackpoll, and Yellow-rumped (Myrtle).  Out of those, which have yellow in the body or undertail?  Just Palm, Prairie, Hooded, Orange-crowned and maybe Blackpoll.  Great!  We’re really narrowing it down now.

biiii

ONLY A FEW SPECIES HAVE A SUPERCILLIUM AND ARE DRABISH-YELLOW LIKE OUR QUIZ BIRD.

Here’s something else, though…what about those brown wingbars?  And the yellow upper and undertail?  Really, that only looks like Palm as far as I can see.  If I go to the Palm Warbler account, I see that in fact those are a unique combo…and combined with tail-pumping, this looks like a really good match.

bbb

OUR PALM WARBLER COMPARISON PAGE CONFIRMS THE ID.
The only thing close is Prairie…but look how the wingabars are yellow, not brown, the streaking is black as opposed to reddish-brown, and the Prairie has a distinct facial pattern that is different from Palm.  It is, in fact, a fall Palm Warbler.  These birds are often seen feeding on the ground, and also in small flocks.  Their continuous tail-pumping is a great tip-off, too, and although there are some other tail-pumping warblers (the Waterthrushes, Magnolia, Prairie and Kirtland).  the flocking, yellow undertail and rump, brownish wingbars (and often crown) and sometimes brown breast streaks are all separators.


And to check out the free downloads we’re currently offering, check out the links below:
Crossley ID Guide Raptors : A sampler raptor guide in PDF format
Quick Finders from The Warbler Guide : A ‘quick finder’ designed to help you identify over 50 warblers faster with targeted color photos.

Fall Warblers

For guys like Scott Whittle and Tom Stephenson, authors of The Warbler Guide, spotting a warbler and snapping a picture is an exciting moment, and for those of us who stepped on a twig and scared that bird off long before we got out our iPhone, we’re just glad someone else is able to get the job done.

The photo below from The Warbler Guide is of a male Common Yellowthroat in the fall.

Common Yellowthroat

Have you spotted any interesting birds this migration season? Let us know in the comments below!

2013 Migration Giveaway: Last Chance To Enter!

Stephenson_WarblerGSince today is the LAST day you can enter, don’t forget to check out our Rafflecopter giveaway event! In honor of the 2013 bird migration, we’re celebrating all through fall with some of our best books on birding, some of our best experts on identifying them, and with a giveaway with a chance to win some free stuff!

The Crossley ID GuideOur prize package includes a copy of three our our best books about birding: The Warbler Guide, The Crossley ID Guide: Raptors, and How to Be a Better Birder, a pair of Zeiss TERRA binoculars, and the audio companion for The Warbler Guide.

How To Be A Better Birder

How to enter? There are numerous ways to enter, including liking any of the three books Facebook pages, emailing us at blog@press.princeton.edu, signing up for our email alerts for Bird and Natural History Titles at http://press.princeton.edu/subscribe/,or tweeting at @PrincetonNature or at any of the author’s Twitter pages (@IDCrossleyGuide or @The WarblerGuide). Just follow the steps in the Rafflecopter box below.

The winner will be selected TOMORROW!

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Remember, the giveaway ends TONIGHT at midnight, so enter now!

And to check out the free downloads we’re currently offering, click on the links below:
Crossley ID Guide Raptors : A sampler raptor guide in PDF format
Quick Finders from The Warbler Guide : A ‘quick finder’ designed to help you identify over 50 warblers faster with targeted color photos.

 

Migration Quiz Monday: Can you identify this Warbler?

In case you weren’t getting enough high-flying fun with this year’s migration series, Tom Stephenson and Scott Whittle, authors of The Warbler Guide, are now getting into the tweeting game. No, not Twitter (you should follow @TheWarblerGuide though), we’re literally posting a bird call identification quiz. From their blog, TheWarblerGuide.com, we’re posting a fun opportunity for bird lovers to get involved with Migration Quiz Mondays!
Plus, don’t forget to scroll to the bottom of the page and check out our giveaway, which closes tomorrow night!


Audio Quiz: Trills Question

WILWAR quiz sono.JPG
Click here to listen

Singing from a short brushy area in the west is a hidden bird. We can see that it has some and maybe a lot of yellow. We think it must be Orange-crowned, Nashville or Wilson’s Warbler. Which is it?

 ORCWAR_121108#08-2.jpg

NASWAR100425_07.jpg

WILWAR_102107#03-2.jpg


Stephenson_WarblerGDon’t forget to check out our Rafflecopter giveaway event!

Our prize package includes a copy of The Warbler Guide, The Crossley ID Guide: Raptors, and How to Be a Better Birder, a pair of Zeiss TERRA binoculars, and the audio companion for The Warbler Guide.

How to win these awesome prizes? Visit this post for details, but there are numerous ways to enter, including liking any of the three books Facebook pages, emailing us at blog@press.princeton.edu, signing up for our email alerts for Bird and Natural History Titles at http://press.princeton.edu/subscribe/,or following/ tweeting at @PrincetonNature or at any of the author’s Twitter pages (@IDCrossleyGuide or @The WarblerGuide). The winner will be selected at the beginning of October.

And to check out the free downloads we’re currently offering, click on the links below:
Crossley ID Guide Raptors : A sampler raptor guide in PDF format
Quick Finders from The Warbler Guide : A ‘quick finder’ designed to help you identify over 50 warblers faster with targeted color photos.

The Warbler Guide: Gear You Need To Be A Birder

When one pictures a person birdwatching, they probably picture someone with a wide-brimmed hat, binoculars glued to their face, and a camera with a huge lens attached to the front. Maybe that lens is tapping against some sort of bird-call whistle, or maybe said whistle is still sticking out of his mouth. In any event, this birder is ready for some serious birdwatching. Right?

Just a moment: we forgot the most important tool! In this age of technology, it may not even seem ironic that one of the best tools a birdwatcher can have is a smart phone. According to TheWarblerGuide.com, there are a lot of useful Apps that one can get to enhance their birding abilities. Here is a list of helpful Apps they recommend:

  • Sibley Guide App – currently the best guide on the iPhone for North American birds
  • Bird Tunes – a good collection of bird songs and vocalizations for North America
  • Weather Bug – our favorite weather app from wunderground.com
  • BirdsEye – a useful way to find local birds, powered by eBird
  • BirdsEye BirdLog – great for creating on-the-fly ebird lists in the field
  • BigRadar – Shows an overall view of radar in the US – useful for looking at migration at night
  • U.S. Nexrad Radar – Shows local radar in realtime, good during migration
  • Fire – A great app for recording audio, either with the iPhone mic, or with an external mic like the Senheisser ME 66

The Warbler GuidePlus, don’t forget to check out our Rafflecopter giveaway event!

Our prize package includes a copy of The Warbler Guide, The Crossley ID Guide: Raptors, and How to Be a Better Birder, a pair of Zeiss TERRA binoculars, and the audio companion for The Warbler Guide.

How to win? Visit this post for details, but there are numerous ways to win, including liking any of the three books Facebook pages, emailing us at blog@press.princeton.edu, signing up for our email alerts for Bird and Natural History Titles at http://press.princeton.edu/subscribe/,or tweeting at @PrincetonNature or at any of the author’s Twitter pages (@IDCrossleyGuide or @The WarblerGuide). The winner will be selected at the beginning of October.

And to check out the free downloads we’re currently offering, check out the links below:
Crossley ID Guide Raptors : A sampler raptor guide in PDF format
Quick Finders from The Warbler Guide : A ‘quick finder’ designed to help you identify over 50 warblers faster with targeted color photos.

The Cape Cod Bird Festival

How To Be A Better BirderIn our continuing quest to bring you all things avian this fall migration season, below is a blog post by Derek Lovitch, author of How to Be a Better Birder. On his blog, Maine Birding Field Notes, he posts all about his bird-sightings and bird events, including the Cape Cod Bird Festival.

Derek Lovitch has worked on avian research and education projects throughout the United States, has written numerous articles for birding publications, and was a columnist for Birding magazine. He now owns and runs Freeport Wild Bird Supply in Maine.

Plus make sure you check out the bottom of this post for some exciting free downloads and giveaways!


A Weekend at the Cape Cod Bird Festival

Other than a departure point for pelagics, it has been over 15 years since I have birded Cape Cod.  Too long.  Every late summer and early fall in particular, it’s “we really should get to the Cape” for shorebirds, especially South Beach and Monomoy Island.  Well, my visit this weekend only wet my pallet for a future, more birding-intensive visit.

I was asked to join the Leica Sports Optics team of good friends Jeff Bouton and David La Puma at their booth for the first annual Cape Cod Bird Festival.  As the only Authorized Leica Optics dealer in Northern New England, I had multiple roles to play.  First, it was to be the retailer of any optics sales.  Secondly, I was there to use my first-hand experience in telling the story of the Critically Endangered Spoon-billed Sandpiper.  Leica has recently become a leading sponsor of the international effort to save this unique species.  And finally, I was there to sign some copies of my book.  Oh yeah, and do some birding and beer-ing with Jeff and David, of course.

The weather forecasts as of Thursday suggested that some good movements of migrants were about to occur.  I went to bed optimistic that the first flight would occur behind the front for Friday morning (see previous blog entry), but as I woke up to rain still falling, I knew that this was not to be.  Therefore, I began my trek southward, stopping for a short visit at Fort Foster in Kittery.  That short visit lasted a little longer than expected, as I found not one, but TWO Connecticut Warblers!

With rain still falling, I left the camera in the car.  Of course, this usually results in some exceptional photographic opportunity.  Yup, sure did.  A Connecticut Warbler (CONW) – normally a frustratingly secretive skulker in migration, walked out (the fact that it was walking, one foot in front of the other, rather than hopping itself helps to clinch the birds’ identity) onto a low branch at the edge of thick brush.  I lamented the lack of a camera, but was enthralled with my view.

A short while later, I was even more shocked to see a second CONW walking out into the relative open!  This time, I remembered that there was an iPhone in my pocket, and out of sheer desperation, I held it up to my binoculars and shot away.  It actually worked…a phone-binned CONW!  (This, as a friend pointed out, may have been a first-ever occurrence).  My best shot – relatively speaking of course – was this one.
CONW_edited-1

But this other shot nicely shows the very pink legs and exceptionally long undertail coverts.
CONW2_Fort_Foster,Kittery, 9-13-13

Oddly enough, with the exception of plenty of Common Yellowthroats, I only encountered three migrant warblers this morning…and two were CONW!  (The other being my first Palm Warbler in southern Maine this fall).  After stopping at Kelly’s Roast Beef, I finally arrived at my destination for the weekend, The Cape Codder in Hyannis.

Meeting up with David and Jeff, we got to work, and it was nice to run into quite a few other friends over the course of the weekend.  David – radar guru and creator of www.Woodcreeper.com – and I were (I know this will come as a surprise) glued to the NEXRAD images and wind forecasts in the evening, hoping to make a sound prediction for the hot birding.

IMG_1556_David_Leica,9-14-13
David works with the next generation of Leica fans.

Well, perhaps we should have tried elsewhere, as Harding Beach in Chatham was not the place to be.  In fact, we tallied the reorienting migrants on one hand (although we didn’t exactly make it there in time for sunrise).  There weren’t many passerines around the woods at Morris Island, either.  Looking at the overnight radar images, and seeing that winds were light north (instead of the forecasted NW), it was obvious that the big flight out onto the Cape just didn’t occur.  I guess the silver lining to this was that we didn’t have too hard of a time pulling ourselves away to spend the rest of the day inside.

At least I had my brand new review copy – thanks to the good folks over at the Houghton Mifflin booth – of the Peterson Reference Guide to Seawatching: Eastern Waterbirds in Flight by my friends Ken Behrens and Cameron Cox to page through.
IMG_2093_edited-1

And look who I found inside!
IMG_2095_edited-1

Come evening, we enjoyed seeing Pete Dunne in his native habitat: captivating a room full of birders with his story-telling.
Pete_Dunne_atCCBF,9-14-13

Afterwards, David and I checked the radar once again.  And once again, we saw birds on the radar, but few birds east of Boston.  Take a look at the 1am radar and velocity images from the Boston area NEXRAD.  The winds were just too light to push birds well out of Cape Cod Bay, apparently.

1am radar,Boston,9-15-131am velocity, Boston,9-15-13

At least we didn’t have to make a decision as to where to start the day, as the three of us were on our way to the harbor to take part in the festival’s pelagic trip.  Like the waters north of Cape Cod (until your reach the waters off of Mount Desert Island), the summer seabirding has been dreadfully slow overall, so expectations were not too high.  The first half of the trip was living up to said low expectations, but things really picked up in the last few hours, as were well east of Cape Cod.  While the least expected seabird (for the season and the area) was probably the Leach’s Storm-Petrel, the highlight for me was this cooperative juvenile Long-tailed Jaeger.
DSC_0022_juvLTJA2,offCapeCod,9-15-13DSC_0024_juvLTJA1,offCapeCod,9-15-13

Although a fairly dark individual, we can see the fairly slim build, small head and bill, and overall more “gentle” appearance.  I flight, it seemed slim and attenuated.  The photos show the two white primary shafts on the upperwing, and the rounded central tail feathers.

We also saw at least two Parasitic Jaegers, including this one chasing a juvenile Common Tern.DSC_0013_PAJA_ad2,off Cape Cod, 9-15-13DSC_0016_PAJAad1,offCape Cod,9-15-13

Four more unidentified, distant jaegers added to the strong finish – any day with jaegers is a good day in my book.  Other highlights included a Black Tern, 14 Sooty, 5 Great, and 1 Manx Shearwater, some good looks at Red-necked Phalaropes, two Basking Sharks and a Mola Mola, but only a couple of Minke Whales.  The cloud of Tree Swallows over Monomoy was quite impressive, as were some of the offshore landbirds: a Cape May Warbler, a Magnolia Warbler, a Northern Harrier, and an immature Black-crowned Night Heron – the latter of which was voicing its displeasure about being about 15 miles from shore, heading back north towards the Cape.  Three bats – at least one that I conclusively identified as a Red Bats, three Lesser Black-backed Gulls, two early Great Cormorants, and a “pelagic” Cloudless Sulfur rounded out what, in the end, was actually a fairly productive outing.

It was a long drive home afterwards, however.  Luckily, southwesterly winds suggested I wouldn’t have to wake up early to get to Sandy Point for dawn.  However, take a look at the radar image.  Once again, I’ve included the 1am image for the example.  It looks like a ton of birds!
1amradar,9-16-131amvelocity,9-16-13
But the velocity image suggested little to no speed for whatever was in the air (it was not foggy last night), so I do not know what it was.

There was little overhead in the morning in either our yard or at Old Town House Park, so I don’t think I was mistaken about this not being a big flight of birds.  Furthermore, in a short listening session before going to bed, I heard very, very little.

Tonight, however…well, let’s just say that I will be at Sandy Point tomorrow morning!  I just hope the winds stay more northwesterly than north, or – gasp – northeasterly by morning as currently suggested by the wind forecast I like to use.
11pm wind forecast,9-16-13

To check out the post on Derek Lovitch’s blog, click here.


Plus, don’t forget to check out our Rafflecopter giveaway event!

Our prize package includes a copy of The Warbler Guide, The Crossley ID Guide: Raptors, and How to Be a Better Birder, a pair of Zeiss TERRA binoculars, and the audio companion for The Warbler Guide.

How to win? Visit this post for details, but there are numerous ways to win, including liking any of the three books Facebook pages, emailing us at blog@press.princeton.edu, signing up for our email alerts for Bird and Natural History Titles at http://press.princeton.edu/subscribe/,or tweeting at @PrincetonNature or at any of the author’s Twitter pages (@IDCrossleyGuide or @The WarblerGuide). The winner will be selected at the beginning of October.

And to check out the free downloads we’re currently offering, check out the links below:
Crossley ID Guide Raptors : A sampler raptor guide in PDF format
Quick Finders from The Warbler Guide : A ‘quick finder’ designed to help you identify over 50 warblers faster with targeted color photos.

Leave a comment if you saw one of these this weekend

Of course, that’s if you can figure out what “one of these” is.

credit Scott Whittle

Photo Credit: Scott Whittle, author of The Warbler Guide

Maybe these icons from this bird’s entry in The Warbler Guide will help you figure out the ID:

Capture

Happy warbling!

The Tom Stephenson and Scott Whittle Fall Warbler Warm-Up

StephensonTom Stephenson and Scott Whittle, authors of The Warbler Guide, have begun blogging like crazy as the fall migration season begins. Their blog, TheWarblerGuide.com, contains posts like the one below, which we will be posting here as well for your bird-viewing pleasure.

Tom Stephenson’s articles and photos have appeared in Birding and Bird Watcher’s Digest, at Surfbirds.com, and in the Handbook of the Birds of the World. He has guided groups across the United States and Asia. A musician, he has had several Grammy and Academy Award winners as clients, and was director of technology at Roland Corporation.

Scott Whittle lives in Cape May, New Jersey, and has twenty years of experience as a professional photographer and educator. He holds an MFA in photography from the School of Visual Arts in New York, is a fellow of the MacDowell Colony, and is a onetime New York State Big Year record holder.

Plus make sure you check out the bottom of this post for some exciting free downloads and giveaways!


Fall is here (for birders, anyway) and warbler migration is underway!  We thought it might be a good time to try a quiz on one of the more frequently confused warblers… here it is:

CAMWAR100911_25v2.jpg

Quiz photos can be a little weird since you only get one look at the bird, and they lack all the other useful cues we use when birding like habitat, behavior, probability, etc…but that’s part of the fun!  Let’s supplement a little here – this bird seems smallish, it’s actively picking insects out of this low cedar, and it’s in Cape May, NJ in September.  Once or twice we see it chase another warbler away from the branch it’s on.  So now that the scene is set, let’s get started.

First, this is a drab bird.  Mostly gray, with some greenish/yellowish tinging, the first issue with this bird is finding ANY field marks!  Actually, that impression of a “lack” of field marks is a good clue, and is a common experience with this bird.

Looking at the finders in the Warbler Guide, I see a few possibilities…

07-11_Warblers_109,115_110-111v1.jpg

So what can we look at that might narrow it down?  Let’s get beyond the “plain gray” thing and see what we can see…the bird has a fine pointy bill, and it looks slightly drooped or decurved.  There is some blurry streaking that goes through the flanks, and maybe the faintest, patchy yellow tinge around the breast.  If I look at the finder, I can eliminate the birds that don’t have distinct streaking:

07-11_Warblers_109,115_110-111v2.jpg

I see two other birds I can eliminate here…the Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle) has yellow shoulder patches, and a white malar/throat, which our bird lacks, and the Palm Warbler has a yellow undertail and wide supercillium, while our bird’s undertail is white, with only an eyeline and eye arcs.  Also, Palm warbler is a habitual tail-pumper, and this bird isn’t doing that.

So now we’re down to three birds: Blackburnian, Blackpoll and Cape May.
07-11_Warblers_109,115_110-111v3a.jpg

Cape May_230-231.jpg
There are a couple more details about this bird that I think will confirm our ID.  First, look at the wings – see the greenish edging on the flight feathers?  Also note that there is actually a greenish-yellow rump on this bird.  Both those marks are excellent…the greenish edging to the feathers is diagnostic for a grayish bird, and the rump is shared only by Yellow-rumped Warbler (which we eliminated) and Magnolia Warbler (which is a brighter yellow, and is actually higher up on the back…the base of the rump is black).  So I think we’ve arrived…it’s a Cape May Warbler!

Next time a drab gray warbler turns up, we now know to check a couple of things… greenish wing edging?  Yellow-green rump?  Fine, pointy bill on a smallish bird?  Aggressive behavior (hence the nickname “Tiger of the Woods”)?  Blurry streaks in the flanks, often with a little patchy yellow in the breast?  And finally (not shown in the quiz photo), fine streaking that extends across the upper breast?  All of these are good indicators that should nudge you towards a Cape May.  Let’s hope we see lots of these great birds this fall!

CAMWAR100911_25edge.jpg

To view this blog on TheWarblerGuide.com, click here.


Plus, don’t forget to check out our Rafflecopter giveaway event!

Our prize package includes a copy of The Warbler Guide, The Crossley ID Guide: Raptors, and How to Be a Better Birder, a pair of Zeiss TERRA binoculars, and the audio companion for The Warbler Guide.

How to win? Visit this post for details, but there are numerous ways to win, including liking any of the three books Facebook pages, emailing us at blog@press.princeton.edu, signing up for our email alerts for Bird and Natural History Titles at http://press.princeton.edu/subscribe/,or tweeting at @PrincetonNature or at any of the author’s Twitter pages (@IDCrossleyGuide or @The WarblerGuide). The winner will be selected at the beginning of October.

And to check out the free downloads we’re currently offering, check out the links below:
Crossley ID Guide Raptors : A sampler raptor guide in PDF format
Quick Finders from The Warbler Guide : A ‘quick finder’ designed to help you identify over 50 warblers faster with targeted color photos.

Win a copy of The Warbler Guide, a pair of TERRA ED Binoculars, and an EcoClean Bird Feeder

Update: This contest is closer. Thank you so much for entering our sweepstakes!

 

Get ready for fall birding and warbler migration by entering our sweepstakes to win a copy of The Warbler Guide, a free download of the The Warbler Guide Song and Call Audio Companion, a WildBirds Unlimited EcoClean Feeder, and a pair of ZEISS, TERRA ED 8×42 binoculars. There are 5 easy ways to enter the raffle (and some can be done each day!)– see the details below.

We are very grateful to ZEISS for providing a prize for our sweepstakes. WildBirds Unlimited of Paramus, NJ is also supporting this sweepstakes by providing a terrific EcoClean bird feeder. Available exclusively at Wild Birds Unlimited, EcoClean bird feeders protect themselves against the surface growth of bacteria, mold, mildew, fungus and other microbes.

WBU Paramus is also hosting an event with Tom Stephenson at 11:00 AM on August 3.  Please support our sponsor and join in the event if you are in the Northern Jersey area.

a Rafflecopter giveaway