More chances to win bird ebooks!

Congratulations to the winners of our bird ebooks giveaway

Thank you to everyone who entered our giveaway for 6 digital copies of our best-selling and most popular bird books. We had such a wonderful response, I decided to pick two winners. Congratulations to Gaurav Kandlikar and Jill Clark who are now owners of an enviable birding library on their handheld devices!

Gaurav noted this was a “nice way to start the week,” and we agree! But the best comment goes to Jill who compared winning our giveaway to winning the Powerball lottery — well, she called it a close second.

I am also pleased to announce another natural history title is now available in the iBooks store: Rare Birds of North America by Steve Howell, Ian Lewington, and Will Russell

Please become a fan of Princeton University Press on our social media sites or subscribe to this blog to receive news of forthcoming giveaways like this!

Princeton University Press on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PrincetonUniversityPress

Princeton University Press on Twitter: https://twitter.com/princetonupress

 

Win 6 Great Bird Ebooks from Princeton University Press

Capture
To celebrate the availability of Princeton University Press’s bird books through the iBooks store, we are hosting a sweepstakes giveaway of all 6 titles. See below for several ways to enter or send an email to blog@press.princeton.edu.

The prize will be 6 promo codes that allow the winner to download complimentary copies of The Crossley ID Guide, The Warbler Guide, The World’s Rarest Birds, Hawks at a Distance, The Birds of Peru, and The Unfeathered Bird. This prize can only be used through the iBooks store and to view these books, you must have an iOS device with iBooks 3 or later and iOS 4.3 or later, or a Mac with iBooks 1.0 or later and OS X 10.9 or later. There is no device or tablet included in this giveaway.

The giveaway will run from 12:15 AM EST, Monday, February 3 through 12:00 PM EST, Friday, February 7.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Digital copies of our top-selling bird books now available on iBooks

Click here to learn how to win copies of all 6 books

Giveaway ends February 7, 2014.

One of the questions we field most often is, “Why can’t I buy an electronic version of this bird book?” So we are delighted to announce that starting this month, several of our most popular birding and natural history titles are now available as ebooks through the iBooks store.

The books are affordable and look simply amazing in digital form — zoom in on Katrina Van Grouw’s intricate drawings of skeletons in The Unfeathered Bird, explore The Crossley ID Guide‘s layered plates in greater detail, or simply revel in the majestic photos and artwork in The World’s Rarest Birds.

To view sample pages and explore these titles further, please use these links:

Birds of Peru
This is easily one of our all-time best-selling field guides and this ebook features all of the same great information and illustrations as the print edition, but makes it more portable and easier to search.
The Crossley ID Guide: Eastern Birds
This has always been a book screaming for a digital edition. To say the plates in this book look incredible on a tablet would be a massive understatement– they are absolutely jaw-dropping beautiful.
The Warbler Guide
The complete text, photos, and sonograms at your fingertips in time for spring migration. Keep the print copy at home for reference and take this digital book into the field.
The Unfeathered Bird
Zooming in on the drawings reveals new details about structure, function, and evolution.
Hawks at a Distance
Even more useful now that you can zoom in and examine the profile and silhouette of the birds.
The World’s Rarest Birds
Not only do the photos and illustrations look incredible, but built-in search functions mean it is easier to find the information you want.

Princeton University Press’s best-selling titles for the last week

These are the best-selling books for the past week.

 

k8967 Einstein and the Quantum: The Quest of the Valiant Swabian by A. Douglas Stone
k10054 The Great Escape: Health, Wealth, and the Origins of Inequality by Angus Deaton
Helmreich_NewYork The New York Nobody Knows: Walking 6,000 Miles in the City by William B. Helmreich
Sides_TheGamble3 The Gamble: Choice and Chance in the 2012 Presidential Election by John Sides & Lynn Vavreck
 k10099 The Princeton Dictionary of Buddhism by Robert E. Buswell Jr. & Donald S. Lopez Jr.
 k10093 Maimonides: Life and Thought by Moshe Halbertal
Tesla: Inventor of the Electrical Age by W. Bernard Carlson Tesla: Inventor of the Electrical Age by W. Bernard Carlson
McCallSmith_Auden What W. H. Auden Can Do for You by Alexander McCall Smith
Stephenson_WarblerG The Warbler Guide by Tom Stephenson & Scott Whittle
 k9144 Afghanistan: A Cultural and Political History by Thomas Barfield

Solution for Week Two Migration Quiz Monday

Visual Quiz: Bird On The Ground Answered

Ready to find out the solution to this week’s Migration Quiz Monday from the authors who brought us The Warbler Guide? Then read on below!

bird1

OUR QUIZ BIRD

Let’s look at the Warbler Guide Finders to narrow this one down.  There are a number of birds with yellow in them…let’s see if there are any other features we can find that will help us narrow it down.

bir

THE FINDERS SHOW A NUMBER OF YELLOW BIRDS – WHAT ELSE CAN WE LOOK FOR?

Let’s work from head to tail … on the head we see a pronounced supercillium (eyebrow)…that should be helpful!  There’s a tinge of brown on the crown, too.  The upperparts of the back are brownish – and look at those wings…there are wingbars but they’re brown, which might be another useful point.  The underparts are patchy yellow, and the rump and undertail are yellow (brighter in the undertail).
bird

SOME USEFUL MARKS INCLUDE A WIDE SUPERCILLIUM, BROWN IN THE CROWN AND WINGS, BROWNISH WING BARS, PATCHY YELLOW IN THE BODY, AND A YELLOW RUMP AND UNDERTAIL.

So let’s look again at the finders…there really aren’t that many birds that are drabish yellow with a strong supercillium.  I see Palm, Prairie, Hooded, Tennessee, Orange-crowned, Blackburnian, Worm-eating, Swainsons, Blackpoll, and Yellow-rumped (Myrtle).  Out of those, which have yellow in the body or undertail?  Just Palm, Prairie, Hooded, Orange-crowned and maybe Blackpoll.  Great!  We’re really narrowing it down now.

biiii

ONLY A FEW SPECIES HAVE A SUPERCILLIUM AND ARE DRABISH-YELLOW LIKE OUR QUIZ BIRD.

Here’s something else, though…what about those brown wingbars?  And the yellow upper and undertail?  Really, that only looks like Palm as far as I can see.  If I go to the Palm Warbler account, I see that in fact those are a unique combo…and combined with tail-pumping, this looks like a really good match.

bbb

OUR PALM WARBLER COMPARISON PAGE CONFIRMS THE ID.
The only thing close is Prairie…but look how the wingabars are yellow, not brown, the streaking is black as opposed to reddish-brown, and the Prairie has a distinct facial pattern that is different from Palm.  It is, in fact, a fall Palm Warbler.  These birds are often seen feeding on the ground, and also in small flocks.  Their continuous tail-pumping is a great tip-off, too, and although there are some other tail-pumping warblers (the Waterthrushes, Magnolia, Prairie and Kirtland).  the flocking, yellow undertail and rump, brownish wingbars (and often crown) and sometimes brown breast streaks are all separators.


And to check out the free downloads we’re currently offering, check out the links below:
Crossley ID Guide Raptors : A sampler raptor guide in PDF format
Quick Finders from The Warbler Guide : A ‘quick finder’ designed to help you identify over 50 warblers faster with targeted color photos.

Kick your Warbler ID skills up a notch with this free tip sheet on Aging and Sexing

We’ve now given away over 45,000 free downloads of the Quick Finders from The Warbler Guide by Tom Stephenson and Scott Whittle. Now we’re kicking things into high gear. Tom and Scott have provided a new download — this one with expert advice on how to age and sex warblers.

Make the most out of the remaining weeks of fall birding by downloading this free tip sheet today.

Simply click the PDF link below and download to your device or computer.

 

[update] We now have a sheet for aging and sexing West Coast fall warblers. [added 9-8-2014]

 

Capture Aging and Sexing Warbler Tip Sheet PDF

2013 Bird Migration Giveaway- Only Four Days Left!

Stephenson_WarblerGWith just four days left to enter, don’t forget to check out our Rafflecopter giveaway event! In honor of the 2013 bird migration, we’re celebrating all through fall with some of our best books on birding, some of our best experts on identifying them, and with a giveaway with a chance to win some free stuff!

The Crossley ID GuideOur prize package includes a copy of three our our best books about birding: The Warbler Guide, The Crossley ID Guide: Raptors, and How to Be a Better Birder, a pair of Zeiss TERRA binoculars, and the audio companion for The Warbler Guide.

How To Be A Better Birder

How to enter? There are numerous ways to enter, including liking any of the three books Facebook pages, emailing us at blog@press.princeton.edu, signing up for our email alerts for Bird and Natural History Titles at http://press.princeton.edu/subscribe/,or tweeting at @PrincetonNature or at any of the author’s Twitter pages (@IDCrossleyGuide or @The WarblerGuide). Just follow the steps in the Rafflecopter box below. The winner will be selected at the beginning of October.

 
a Rafflecopter giveaway

Remember, the giveaway ends Tuesday night (October 1st) at midnight, so enter now!


And to check out the free downloads we’re currently offering, click on the links below:
Crossley ID Guide Raptors : A sampler raptor guide in PDF format
Quick Finders from The Warbler Guide : A ‘quick finder’ designed to help you identify over 50 warblers faster with targeted color photos.

 

The Tom Stephenson and Scott Whittle Fall Warbler Warm-Up

StephensonTom Stephenson and Scott Whittle, authors of The Warbler Guide, have begun blogging like crazy as the fall migration season begins. Their blog, TheWarblerGuide.com, contains posts like the one below, which we will be posting here as well for your bird-viewing pleasure.

Tom Stephenson’s articles and photos have appeared in Birding and Bird Watcher’s Digest, at Surfbirds.com, and in the Handbook of the Birds of the World. He has guided groups across the United States and Asia. A musician, he has had several Grammy and Academy Award winners as clients, and was director of technology at Roland Corporation.

Scott Whittle lives in Cape May, New Jersey, and has twenty years of experience as a professional photographer and educator. He holds an MFA in photography from the School of Visual Arts in New York, is a fellow of the MacDowell Colony, and is a onetime New York State Big Year record holder.

Plus make sure you check out the bottom of this post for some exciting free downloads and giveaways!


Fall is here (for birders, anyway) and warbler migration is underway!  We thought it might be a good time to try a quiz on one of the more frequently confused warblers… here it is:

CAMWAR100911_25v2.jpg

Quiz photos can be a little weird since you only get one look at the bird, and they lack all the other useful cues we use when birding like habitat, behavior, probability, etc…but that’s part of the fun!  Let’s supplement a little here – this bird seems smallish, it’s actively picking insects out of this low cedar, and it’s in Cape May, NJ in September.  Once or twice we see it chase another warbler away from the branch it’s on.  So now that the scene is set, let’s get started.

First, this is a drab bird.  Mostly gray, with some greenish/yellowish tinging, the first issue with this bird is finding ANY field marks!  Actually, that impression of a “lack” of field marks is a good clue, and is a common experience with this bird.

Looking at the finders in the Warbler Guide, I see a few possibilities…

07-11_Warblers_109,115_110-111v1.jpg

So what can we look at that might narrow it down?  Let’s get beyond the “plain gray” thing and see what we can see…the bird has a fine pointy bill, and it looks slightly drooped or decurved.  There is some blurry streaking that goes through the flanks, and maybe the faintest, patchy yellow tinge around the breast.  If I look at the finder, I can eliminate the birds that don’t have distinct streaking:

07-11_Warblers_109,115_110-111v2.jpg

I see two other birds I can eliminate here…the Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle) has yellow shoulder patches, and a white malar/throat, which our bird lacks, and the Palm Warbler has a yellow undertail and wide supercillium, while our bird’s undertail is white, with only an eyeline and eye arcs.  Also, Palm warbler is a habitual tail-pumper, and this bird isn’t doing that.

So now we’re down to three birds: Blackburnian, Blackpoll and Cape May.
07-11_Warblers_109,115_110-111v3a.jpg

Cape May_230-231.jpg
There are a couple more details about this bird that I think will confirm our ID.  First, look at the wings – see the greenish edging on the flight feathers?  Also note that there is actually a greenish-yellow rump on this bird.  Both those marks are excellent…the greenish edging to the feathers is diagnostic for a grayish bird, and the rump is shared only by Yellow-rumped Warbler (which we eliminated) and Magnolia Warbler (which is a brighter yellow, and is actually higher up on the back…the base of the rump is black).  So I think we’ve arrived…it’s a Cape May Warbler!

Next time a drab gray warbler turns up, we now know to check a couple of things… greenish wing edging?  Yellow-green rump?  Fine, pointy bill on a smallish bird?  Aggressive behavior (hence the nickname “Tiger of the Woods”)?  Blurry streaks in the flanks, often with a little patchy yellow in the breast?  And finally (not shown in the quiz photo), fine streaking that extends across the upper breast?  All of these are good indicators that should nudge you towards a Cape May.  Let’s hope we see lots of these great birds this fall!

CAMWAR100911_25edge.jpg

To view this blog on TheWarblerGuide.com, click here.


Plus, don’t forget to check out our Rafflecopter giveaway event!

Our prize package includes a copy of The Warbler Guide, The Crossley ID Guide: Raptors, and How to Be a Better Birder, a pair of Zeiss TERRA binoculars, and the audio companion for The Warbler Guide.

How to win? Visit this post for details, but there are numerous ways to win, including liking any of the three books Facebook pages, emailing us at blog@press.princeton.edu, signing up for our email alerts for Bird and Natural History Titles at http://press.princeton.edu/subscribe/,or tweeting at @PrincetonNature or at any of the author’s Twitter pages (@IDCrossleyGuide or @The WarblerGuide). The winner will be selected at the beginning of October.

And to check out the free downloads we’re currently offering, check out the links below:
Crossley ID Guide Raptors : A sampler raptor guide in PDF format
Quick Finders from The Warbler Guide : A ‘quick finder’ designed to help you identify over 50 warblers faster with targeted color photos.

Migration Sweepstakes — enter to win everything you need to make the most of Fall birdwatching!

To kick off our Migration blog coverage, we’re taking to the skies with a Rafflecopter giveaway event!

Our prize package includes a copy of The Warbler Guide, The Crossley ID Guide: Raptors, and How to Be a Better Birder, a pair of Zeiss TERRA binoculars, and the audio companion for The Warbler Guide.

How to win? There are numerous ways to win, including liking any of the three books Facebook pages, emailing us at blog@press.princeton.edu, signing up for our email alerts for Bird and Natural History Titles at http://press.princeton.edu/subscribe/,or tweeting at @PrincetonNature or at any of the author’s Twitter pages (@IDCrossleyGuide or @The WarblerGuide). Just follow the steps in the Rafflecopter box below. The winner will be selected at the beginning of October.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Win a copy of The Warbler Guide, a pair of TERRA ED Binoculars, and an EcoClean Bird Feeder

Update: This contest is closer. Thank you so much for entering our sweepstakes!

 

Get ready for fall birding and warbler migration by entering our sweepstakes to win a copy of The Warbler Guide, a free download of the The Warbler Guide Song and Call Audio Companion, a WildBirds Unlimited EcoClean Feeder, and a pair of ZEISS, TERRA ED 8×42 binoculars. There are 5 easy ways to enter the raffle (and some can be done each day!)– see the details below.

We are very grateful to ZEISS for providing a prize for our sweepstakes. WildBirds Unlimited of Paramus, NJ is also supporting this sweepstakes by providing a terrific EcoClean bird feeder. Available exclusively at Wild Birds Unlimited, EcoClean bird feeders protect themselves against the surface growth of bacteria, mold, mildew, fungus and other microbes.

WBU Paramus is also hosting an event with Tom Stephenson at 11:00 AM on August 3.  Please support our sponsor and join in the event if you are in the Northern Jersey area.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

 

Downloadable Quick Finders from The Warbler Guide

You asked, we listened.

The minute people got their hands on The Warbler Guide by Tom Stephenson and Scott Whittle, they started asking if we might provide downloadable versions of the Quick Finder section. Thank you for all the great suggestions!

We are very pleased to offer these image files for people to download, laminate, and keep in their backpack. They are incredibly useful in the field because they present a quick snapshot of every North American species of warbler for side-by-side comparison.

So pick your favorite format below — JPG or PDF — and make sure you pick up a copy of The Warbler Guide to confirm your field IDs.

Update: You can also download a complete set of the PDFs in a zip file or as a zip file of JPGs if you prefer.

Update: Take your Warbler ID skills to the next level with this free tip sheet on aging and sexing warblers. [added 10-4-2013]

Update: This free tip sheet will help you age and sex fall West Coast Warblers. [added 9-8-2014]

 

Face Quick Finder Face Quick Finder PDF | JPG
45 Degree Quick Finder 45 Degree Quick Finder PDF | JPG
East Fall Quick Finder East Fall Quick Finder PDF | JPG
East Spring Quick Finder East Spring Quick Finder PDF | JPG
Side Quick Finder Side Quick Finder PDF | JPG
Undertails Quick Finder Undertails Quick Finder PDF | JPG
Underview Quick Finder Underview Quick Finder PDF | JPG
West Quick Finder Western Quick Finder PDF | JPG