University Press Week Blog Tour Day 5: Author Conversations

thanks to authorsThe final day of the University Press Week blog tour focuses on presses in conversation with their authors. Here at Princeton we would like to take a moment to thank all of our wonderful authors across many disciplines, without whom our esteemed publishing program could not exist. In the past year, PUP has been fortunate enough to publish multiple Nobel Prize winners, up-and-coming stars, renowned scholars and cultural critics. Our authors range from game theorists to astrophysicists, from art historians to professional ornithologists.

Each week on the PUP blog, we feature conversations with our authors about our books. These conversations, such as this one with n+1 co-founder Mark Greif, this one with classics professor Josiah Ober, or this one with biologists and bee experts Olivia Messinger Carril and Joseph Wilson, always provide wonderful behind-the-scenes glimpses of the writing process the origins of our authors’ research.

Today, these university presses share conversations with their own authors:

Temple University Press
Columbia University Press
University of Virginia Press
Beacon Press
University of Illinois Press
Southern Illinois University Press
University Press of Kansas
Oregon State University Press
Liverpool University Press
University of Toronto Press

University Press Week Blog Tour: What’s Surprising? #ReadUp

UpWeekThis week, Princeton University Press will be participating in the University Press Week blog tour. Stay tuned for our featured post on Wednesday from our Design department on the launch of an exciting new social media initiative.

Today, in keeping with the online gallery theme, check out posts from other university presses on what projects they’ve found particularly surprising. Our own biggest surprise of the year is a foray into children’s literature with the 150th anniversary edition of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, including illustrations by Salvador Dalí. You can read more about that at the online gallery, and on the PUP blog later this week.

So, what’s surprising in university press publishing this year? #ReadUp!

  • University Press of Florida blogs recipes and photos from recent UPF cookbooks that have changed how people view the Sunshine State, highlighting a thriving food scene that has often gone unnoticed amid the state’s highly-publicized beaches and theme parks.
  • University Press of New England reflects on the unusual success of a book from their trade imprint, ForeEdge. The book is titled Winning Marriage by Marc Solomon, and traces the years-long, state-by-state legal battle for marriage equality in America. Surprises came in many forms: from the serendipitous timing of the book’s publication with the Supreme Court ruling to the book’s ability to resonate with general readers and legal scholars alike—and many others surprises in between.
  • University Press of Mississippi, Steve Yates, marketing director, describes how the Press has partnered with Lemuria Books in Jackson and writers across the state to create the Mississippi Books page at the Clarion Ledger.
  • University Press of Kentucky features a pop quiz of some surprising facts about AAUP Member Presses.
  • University of California Press will discuss their Luminos and Collabra OA publishing platforms.
  • University of Wisconsin Press writes about how mystery fiction is a surprise hit, and a surprisingly good fit for their publishing program. Their sleuths in several series include a duo of globe-trotting art history experts, a Wisconsin sheriff in a favorite tourist destination, a gay literature professor, and a tough detective who quotes Shakespeare and Melville.
  • The University of Nebraska Press is more than their books! Find out about the UNP staff and who they are.
  • And check out surprise posts from University of Michigan and University Press of Kansas as well.


Day 5 of #UPWeek is finally here — the global reach of university presses

upweekToday is the last day of the University Press Week Blog Tour and it’s finally our turn! Today Peter Dougherty considers the importance of finding foreign language publishers to translate and publish UP-generated works. We are joined by a raft of other publishers considering the various ways university presses are expanding the global reach of the scholarship we publish.

Columbia University Press
Georgetown University Press

Discusses how Georgetown University Press gives its readers the tools they need to have a global reach themselves through our foreign language learning materials, our international career guides, and our international affairs titles.

Indiana University Press
IUP presents an overview of their Mellon-funded Framing the Global project which will develop and disseminate new knowledge, approaches, and methods in the field of global research.
Johns Hopkins University Press

From book translations to international marketing and the growth of Project MUSE into many different nations, the JHU Press can’t help but think beyond the borders of the United States.

New York University Press
Chip Rossetti, managing editor of the Library of Arabic Literature (LAL), will discuss the new LAL series, an ambitious international project which comes out of a partnership between NYU Press and NYU Abu Dhabi.
Princeton University Press
Peter Dougherty, Press Director, writes about the importance of foreign language translations to the future of university press economic health and fulfillment of our missions.
University of Wisconsin Press

Press director Sheila Leary profiles the publishing career of Jan Vansina, one of the founders of the field of African history (rather than colonial history). His innovative seven books with the University of Wisconsin Press from the 1960s to the present have continually broken new ground, influencing the historiography of Africa and several related disciplines.

Yale University Press

Ivan Lett writes on recent transatlantic collaboration of US-UK marketing initiatives for Yale University Press globally published titles, series, and digital products.

The complete schedule for the blog tour is located here.

#UPWeek Blog Tour turns its attention to the importance of regional publishing on Day 4

upweekUniversity Presses make tremendous scholarly contributions, but they also operate as local publishers, publishing the best regional books for their respective states. These books can be anything from cookbooks to walking tours, narrative histories to pop culture and art coffee table books. It may be tempting to write off this portion of our publishing programs as frivolous, but as the blog tour stops demonstrate today, this would be a big mistake.

Fordham University Press

Fredric Nachbaur, Press Director, writes about establishing the Empires State Editions imprint to better brand and market the regional books, reflect the mission of the university, and co-publish books with local institutions.

Louisiana State University Press
LSU Press discusses the challenges they face in capturing an authentic representation of Louisiana’s culture. How do the editors work with authors to capture the nuances of Louisiana’s food, music, and art?
Syracuse University Press

Regional author, Chuck D’Imperio discusses the roots of regional writing in many of the “classics.” From oral testimonies to local guidebooks, these stories contribute to the culture and history of the region.

University of Alabama Press
University of Nebraska Press

UNP’s Editor-in-Chief Derek Krissoff defines the meaning of place in University Press publishing.

University of North Carolina Press

UNC Press editorial director Mark Simpson-Vos highlights the special value of regional university press
publishing at a time when the scale for so much of what we do emphasizes the global.

University Press of Kentucky
UPK considers its role in preserving Kentucky’s cultural heritage and some of the fun things that make KY (and KY books) unique.
University Press of Mississippi

UPM Marketing Manager and author of two books Steve Yates gives his thoughts on the scale of regional publishing and shares the sage advice of businessmen

Oregon State University Press
A great quick intro to regional publishing and highlights from OSU Press’s regional catalog.

The complete schedule for the blog tour is located here.

Day 3 of the #UPWeek Blog Tour focuses on specialty subjects from some of our colleagues

upweekFor Day 3 of the University Press Week Blog Tour, we turn our attention to the content–the subjects of the books, journals, series, and everything else–we publish. This is an opportunity for presses to highlight special subject areas in which they publish, or subjects for which their press is particularly well known.

MIT Press

Gita Manaktala, Editorial Director, writes about the possibilities of the web. MIT Press authors are increasingly using the internet for scholarship, finding newly mediated ways to teach, to conduct research, to present data, and to engage with various publics.

Texas A&M University Press
University of Georgia Press
Nik Heynen, Deborah Cowen, and Melissa W. Wright, series co-editors, will discuss UGA Press geography books, specifically as they relate to the Geographies of Justice and Social Transformation series.
University of Pennsylvania Press

Penn Press acquisitions editors discuss the foundations and future of some of the press’s key subject areas.

University of Toronto Press

A discussion of the Medieval and Renaissance Studies lists.

Wilfrid Laurier University Press

Cheryl Lousley, editor of the Environmental Humanities series, writes about the engagement of environmental issues through the humanities disciplines, such as literature, film, and media studies, for example. She outlines the genesis of the series and discusses some of the most recent publications.

The complete schedule for the blog tour is located here.

Day 2 of the #UPWeek Blog Tour is underway with posts on the future of scholarly communication

upweekThe focus of Day 2 of the University Press Week Blog Tour is “The Future of Scholarly Communications”. University Presses are engaged in a wide variety of new initiatives designed to acquire and publish meaningful scholarship in new and innovative ways and in partnerships with libraries, organizations, and other groups with vested interests in this area of what we do. Today we celebrate a few of these initiatives and take a peek at what the future holds for us all.

Duke University Press
Priscilla Wald, Professor of English and Women’s Studies at Duke University, on the slow future of scholarly communication.
Harvard University Press
Jeffrey Schnapp, faculty director of metaLAB (at) Harvard and editor of the new metaLABprojects book series, on the emerging currents of experimental scholarship for which the series provides a platform.
Stanford University Press

Alan Harvey, Press Director, discusses the challenges presented by new technologies in publishing, and how the industry model is adapting to new reading-consumption habits.

Temple University Press

Alex Holzman explores the partnerships university presses and libraries can forge as the means of communicating scholarship evolves.

University of Minnesota Press
Editor Dani Kasprzak describes a new UMP initiative.
University of Texas Press

Robert Devens, Assistant Editor-in-Chief for the University of Texas Press, on the future of scholarly communication.

University of Virginia Press

Historian Holly Shulman, editor of The Dolley Madison Digital Edition and the forthcoming People of the Founding Era, looks at the need for university presses to adapt to new technologies, while ackowledging the difficulties of doing so.

The complete schedule for the blog tour is located here.

Free #UPWeek event “Innovation in Scholarly Publishing”

upweekAs part of the celebration of University Press Week, Association of American University Presses is hosting a free online program “Innovation in Scholarly Publishing”, November 15 at 2:30 PM:

Join speakers *William Germano*, Dean of Cooper Union, author, and former Editor in Chief of Columbia University Press, *Kathleen Fitzpatrick*, Director of Scholarly Communication at the Modern Language Association, and *Gita Manaktala*, Editorial Director at The MIT Press and moderator *Carlin Romano*, Critic-at-Large of/The Chronicle of Higher Education/, former President of the National Book Critics Circle, and a Guggenheim Fellow, for a discussion of the implications of recent technological and cultural shifts for the work of AAUP members and their authors.

More information and RSVP:

Don’t forget that the University Press Week Blog Tour starts on Monday, November 11! Complete schedule is available here. Princeton University Press will contribute to the tour on Friday.