Bird Fact Friday – Weekly Warbler: Magnolia

Welcome back to the warblers!

Magnolia Warbler, Spring Male, credit Scott Whittle

As the warbler migration season approaches, we’re again highlighting some fun facts about the warblers with our Weekly Warbler feature. Kicking it off today is the Magnolia Warbler.

From page 340-341 in The Warbler Guide:

The Magnolia Warbler has bright yellow underparts and throat. Its tail pattern is unique and diagnostic—it has a black tail with broad white base. It often spreads tail, showing white tail spots very high in tail. The Magnolia Warbler has a black face mask with white eyebrow stripe and white under-eye arc. It is one of the three warblers that have a bright yellow rump (along with Yellow-rumped and Cape May). The Magnolia Warbler has a heavy black necklace that extends down sides. It is moderately active, usually in low to mid-story. During migration it is versatile, foraging in many habitats.

 

The Warbler Guide
Tom Stephenson & Scott Whittle
Drawings by Catherine Hamilton
Warbler Guide App
Species Account Example: American Redstart Male

Warblers are amwarblerong the most challenging birds to identify. They exhibit an array of seasonal plumages and have distinctive yet oft-confused calls and songs. The Warbler Guide enables you to quickly identify any of the 56 species of warblers in the United States and Canada. This groundbreaking guide features more than 1,000 stunning color photos, extensive species accounts with multiple viewing angles, and an entirely new system of vocalization analysis that helps you distinguish songs and calls.

The Warbler Guide revolutionizes birdwatching, making warbler identification easier than ever before. For more information, please see the author videos on the Princeton University Press website.

A new giveaway to get you ready for spring warbler migration

With the spring migration underway, take the opportunity to head to the field and watch these brightly colored neotropical migrants travel back north.

WarblerThe Warbler Guide is an essential resource for any warbler enthusiast, and the most comprehensive and user-friendly source for warbler information that makes warbler identification easier than ever.

Not feeling like carrying a book? PUP also offers many portable options. You can download the Warbler Guide App (now available for both Apple & Android devices) to get all the benefits of the book in the palm of your hand, plus many more app-only features. For example, with the rotatable 3D models that enable you to see a warbler from any angle, you can identify a warbler from the exact position you see it.

You can also download our FREE Quick Finders in pdf or jpg. Offering a quick snapshot of every North American species of warbler for side-by-side comparison, the Quick Finders sort warblers in a variety of ways to suit your needs.

WarblersIt’s also time for a new giveaway! Seven winners will receive a copy of the North American Warblers Fold-out Guide—a handy, pocket-sized foldout reference, with QR codes that take you to a range of common vocalizations for each species. Follow the directions below—the entry period ends April 20!

You can also check out Nicholas Lund’s tips and advices on birdwatching during spring migration, or check BirdCast for realtime bird forecasts that track the waves of migrants.

Armed with the most helpful tools and guides, you just might have your best spring birdwatching season ever!

 

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The Warbler Guide App Blog Tour, Day 5

This week we have traveled the digital and physical world to bring you sneak peeks and previews of The Warbler Guide App. Now, on the last day of our blog tour, we are delighted to present the first review of the app from someone outside of our offices!

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Donna Schulman of 10,000 Birds reviewed the book and the sound companion and we are delighted she was able to download and use The Warbler Guide App preview we sent her. Here are her thoughts:

The app offers flexibility of access and multiple options for viewing and listening to warbler species, including options for comparison viewing and listening….The app is delightful. The book is serious. In a perfect world, or in a world where you could ask some nice person for one or two gifts for the holidays, a birder could conceivably own The Warbler Guide in both formats. The pricing does not make this inconceivable. The app should be available for purchase through iTunes in a matter of days. And, then think of all the fun you would have come warbler time, in April (for you southern birders) and May.

Source: 10,000 Birds, http://10000birds.com/the-warbler-guide-app-a-review-by-an-app-loving-birder.htm

Please support our blog tour participants by visiting their sites:

Day 4:

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Day 3:

warblerwatch

Day 2:

drunk

 

prairie

Day 1:

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The Warbler Guide App Blog Tour, Day 4

Digital formats allow authors and developers to present images in new and exciting ways. For The Warbler Guide App, Tom Stephenson and Scott Whittle took it all the way by commissioning exclusive 3D illustrations that allow users to literally spin and flip a warbler to any angle. Better yet, you can spin and flip two warblers side by side for quick comparisons. So, when you spot a bird from a strange angle, you can quickly replicate that view in the app and compare it with similar species.

For today’s tour stop, the American Birding Association presents an exclusive video of the visual elements of The Warbler Guide App including a preview of this 3D capability.

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Please support our blog tour participants by visiting their sites:

Day 3:

warblerwatch

Day 2:

drunk

 

prairie

Day 1:

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The Warbler Guide App Blog Tour, Day 1

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Visit Birding Is Fun today to view an exclusive video that shows how sounds are incorporated into The Warbler Guide App.

Look for our tour stop logo this week for more exclusive material. We hope the app will be live on iTunes any day now, in time for your holiday shopping!

 

 

 

The Warbler Guide, winner of a 2014 National Outdoor Book Award in Nature Guidebooks

warblerTom Stephenson and Scott Whittle, authors of The Warbler Guide, received high praise for their book from the National Outdoor Book Awards. The guide covers 56 species of Warblers and features over 1,000 color photos and is a must have for Warbler watching enthusiasts. The review committee had the following to say of The Warbler Guide:

“This visually striking guide is a birders’ bonanza. It is encyclopedic in coverage and incorporates an array of tools to help identify North America’s 56 warbler species. Open it up and straight away you’ll find several handy ‘quick finders’ which picture each bird in one of several observational aspects: face profile, side view, 45-degree perspective and underside views. That’s just a start. The bulk of the guide describes each bird in elaborate detail, including habitat keys, feeding styles, extensive sonograms, migration patterns, and photos, lots of photos, of each species seen from every possible viewing angle. Pore over this book in the winter and you’ll be armed and ready for springtime’s annual flood of warblers.”

For a list of the other 2014 Winners of the National Outdoors Book Awards, click here.

Congratulations to Tom Stephenson and Scott Whittle!

Using the filter feature on The Warbler Guide App

Scott Whittle and Tom Stephenson revolutionized how birders study, find, hear, and see warblers with their acclaimed book The Warbler Guide. Now they have their sights set on bringing all the breakthrough features from the book, plus a host of app-only features, to your iPhone® and iPad® in the Warbler Guide App.

In this video, Scott introduces the app’s innovative filter function that allows users to narrow their search results by color, facial marks, wing bands, and song. Intuitive, visual, and interactive, this system allows users to find the bird they are seeing in the field quickly and easily.

The Warbler Guide App will be available in December 2014.


bookjacket Warbler Guide App
Tom Stephenson & Scott Whittle
APP | Spring 2015 | $12.99 | ISBN: 9781400849901

A new free download from the authors of The Warbler Guide helps age and sex West Coast warblers

We’ve now given away close to 60,000 free downloads of the Quick Finders from The Warbler Guide by Tom Stephenson and Scott Whittle. Last fall we surprised everyone with a sheet with advice on aging and sexing Eastern Fall warblers. This year, we are delighted to present Tom and Scott’s tips on identifying, aging and sexing Western Fall warblers.

Make the most out of the remaining weeks of fall birding by downloading this free tip sheet today.

Simply click the image or PDF link below and download to your device or computer.

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Aging and Sexing Warbler Tip Sheet, credit: Tom Stephenson and Scott Whittle, authors of The Warbler Guide.

Click here to view PDF [right click and save if you wish]

11-Year-Old Birder Raises Money for Conservation with #PhotoBigDay

Dessi1Dessi Sieburth, an 11-year-old birder from Pasadena, California, has just set the PhotoBigDay record for Antelope Valley, and for a great cause.

Tom Stephenson and Scott Whittle, co-authors of The Warbler Guide, started PhotoBigDay earlier this spring. Big Days are a tradition in the world of birding, a challenge to see how many different species of birds you can spot in a single day. Today, Big Days have become increasingly competitive, with seasoned birders and ornithologists using advanced equipment to catalogue species midnight to midnight. Stephenson and Whittle created PhotoBigDay with ordinary birders in mind, and with an added twist: participants must document every bird they see on film.

big photo day white faced ibisSieburth recorded 85 species on his PhotoBigDay, including:

  • White-Faced Ibis
  • Snowy Egret
  • Burrowing Owl
  • Caspian Tern
  • American White Pelican
  • Loggerhead Shrike
  • Wilson’s Warbler
  • Western Tanager
  • Nuttal’s Woodpecker
  • Osprey

Sieburth used his PhotoBigDay as a fundraiser for conservation, and raised $200 so far for the preservation of a local migration area and seed for bird feeders.

 

Photos here are courtesy of Beatrix Schwarz, Dessi’s proud mother!

PUP News of the World, May 23, 2014

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Each week we post a round-up of some of our most exciting national and international PUP book coverage. Reviews, interviews, events, articles–this is the spot for coverage of all things “PUP books” that took place in the last week. Enjoy!


BirdGenie

Planning your outdoor adventures for the upcoming summer? Picnic baskets, sunscreen — the list of outdoor essentials goes on. But this summer, PUP is adding another item to the list, and you won’t want to leave home without it.

BirdGenie™ is a remarkable app that enables anyone with a supported Apple® or Android® smartphone or tablet to identify birds in the backyard, at the local park, or on the nature trail–all with the tap of a button! It’s like Shazam® for nature–just hold up your phone, record the bird singing, and BirdGenie tells you what bird it is! This summer, PUP will be releasing two apps, each covering a separate region: Backyard Birds East and Backyard Birds West. This week, the apps were featured in Inside Higher Ed, and the article quotes one of the developers, Tom Stephenson, author of The Warbler Guide:

“The one thing about field guides is that the print medium isn’t quite sufficient for the information that you’re trying to relay, but it’s been the only vehicle up until recently. Having a vehicle like an app or an ebook that has multimedia capabilities is not only natural, but really adds a lot value. The song identification app is another step further.”

Each regional app contains eighty vocalization types for sixty bird species, covering almost all of the birds you are likely to encounter. When you hear a singing bird and make a clear recording with your smartphone or tablet, BirdGenie identifies the bird if it is an included species, tells you exactly how confident it is that the identification is correct, and provides audio samples of the bird’s various songs to compare with your own recording, as well as color photos, useful information, and links to further reading. No internet connection is needed, making BirdGenie accessible everywhere you go.

COUNT LIKE AN EGYPTIAN

For those who have mastered — or almost mastered — modern math, we’re traveling back in time to bring you a curve-ball problem. David Reimer’s Count Like an Egyptian provides a fun, hands-on introduction to the intuitive and often-surprising art of ancient Egyptian math. Reimer guides you step-by-step through addition, subtraction, multiplication, and more. He even shows you how fractions and decimals may have been calculated–they technically didn’t exist in the land of the pharaohs. You’ll be counting like an Egyptian in no time, and along the way you’ll learn firsthand how mathematics is an expression of the culture that uses it, and why there’s more to math than rote memorization and bewildering abstraction.

The book was reviewed in the Washington Post. Nancy Szokan says:

You get the feeling that David Reimer must be a pretty entertaining teacher. An associate professor of mathematics at the College of New Jersey, he has taken on the task of explaining ancient math systems by having you use them. And though it’s not easy, he manages to lead you, step by step, through a hieroglyphic based calculation of how many 10-pesu loaves of bread you can make from seven hekat of grain.

Professor Reimer also puts his book to the “Page 99 test” (open your book to page 99 and see a snapshot of the book). Check it out! Prefer to start from the beginning? You can also read the introduction here.

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ENLIGHTENING SYMBOLS

Don’t leave the post just yet, mathematics fans. Our author, Joseph Mazur, wrote a piece for the Guardian this week about the origins of mathematical symbols. His book, Enlightening Symbols, explains the fascinating history behind the development of our mathematical notation system. He shows how symbols were used initially, how one symbol replaced another over time, and how written math was conveyed before and after symbols became widely adopted.

He writes:

A few years ago friends and I were talking about the origins of written music. When the conversation turned to the origins of math symbols, I was surprised to learn that few people knew that almost all maths was written rhetorically before the 16th century, often in metered poetry. Most people think symbols for addition, subtraction or equality had been around long before Euclid wrote his Elements in the first century BCE. No! The original Elements is rhetorical. There are no symbols in Euclid’s works, aside from the letters marking the ends of lines and corners of geometric objects. There are no symbols in any early Arab algebra books. Nor do we find any in early European printed algebra books.

Check out Chapter One of his book.

LIBERALISM

This week, the Economist published a review of a new book by Edmund Fawcett, Liberalism: The Life of an Idea. The piece says:

Sometimes it seems as if liberalism is slowly caving in. Western democracies are battered by partisanship and populism. Inequality is undermining social cohesion. Governments are unconvincingly shoring up expensive welfare states that have failed to match their promise. Meanwhile, the running is being made by places such as Turkey, which has an intolerant majority, and China and Russia, where power cannot be contested. “Liberalism” by Edmund Fawcett is not only a gripping piece of intellectual history, it also equips the reader to understand today’s threats—and how they might be withstood.

Check out the review in its entirety. Liberalism was released this spring. In this engrossing history of liberalism–the first in English for many decades–veteran political observer Edmund Fawcett traces the ideals, successes, and failures of this central political tradition through the lives and ideas of a rich cast of European and American thinkers and politicians, from the early nineteenth century to today.

Using a broad idea of liberalism, the book discusses celebrated thinkers from Constant and Mill to Berlin, Hayek, and Rawls, as well as more neglected figures. Its twentieth-century politicians include Franklin D. Roosevelt, Lyndon Johnson, and Willy Brandt, but also Hoover, Reagan, and Kohl. The story tracks political liberalism from its beginnings in the 1830s to its long, grudging compromise with democracy, through a golden age after 1945 to the present mood of challenge and doubt.

Read the Introduction here.

Looking forward to spring warblers? Join The Warbler Guide at these events in Philadelphia

We’re looking forward to spring with three fantastic warbler events this weekend at John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge at Tinicum. Tom Stephenson and Scott Whittle, co-authors of The Warbler Guide, will be on-hand to give workshops on warbler ID and guide a few walks.

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Click here to download a PDF flyer for these events.

Announcing the #PhotoBigDay

big day logoThe brainchild of Tom Stephenson and Scott Whittle, co-authors of The Warbler Guide, the Photo Big Day presents a fun, new challenge for birders of all levels. Big Days are established fundraising events — teams of four birders head out to spot as many birds as they can in the span of 24 hours. The big difference this time around is that every sighting has to be documented on film.

We are proud to be co-sponsoring and supporting this effort and we hope you will check out more information at the links below. Good luck to Team Warbler!!!

MORE INFORMATION:
http://www.bigbirdphotoday.org Find out about big photo days, start your own team, raise funds, and more!

http://www.listing.aba.org The official home of big day lists, allows ABA members to upload their totals and results and see records for any area, and will also be live blogging and tweeting the Big Photo Day!

http://www.warblerguide.com Scott Whittle and Tom Stephenson’s site, with info on the Big Photo Day, and much more

http://www.facebook.com/warblerguide For more updates and live posts from Team Warbler

Follow us on Twitter @thewarblerguide

And find out more with #PhotoBigDay