The official zombie diagnosis, courtesy of Nerdist and Do Zombies Dream of Undead Sheep

k10305Have you and your friends ever sat around the TV after watching the most recent episode of The Walking Dead and wondered what caused the infection or virus to spread? If you have, you’re not the only one.

Kyle Hill of Nerdist recently shared the “official zombie diagnosis,” from Bradley Voytek and Timothy Verstynen’s book Do Zombies Dream of Undead Sheep? A Neuroscientific View of the Zombie Brain. It turns out zombies are actually suffering from “Consciousness Deficit Hypoactivity Disorder ,” or CDHD. How is CDHD transmitted? Hill concludes the bacteria in a zombie’s bite and the lack of proper medical care are the most likely explanations for the zombie epidemic.

Voytek and Verstynen describe the symptoms of CDHD: “lack of intentional control over their actions, lethargic and fatigued movements (akinesthesia), loss of pleasure (anhedonia), general language dysfunction (aphasia), memory impairments (amnesias), and an inability to suppress appetitive actions such as eating or aggressive ‘fight-or-flight’ behaviors.”

In the book, Voytek and Verstynen also theorize as to why some zombies are slow and other are fast. Hill sums up their theory succinctly. “They call it the time-to-resurrection hypothesis. It goes like this. The longer the brain goes without oxygen or nutrients, the more damaged it gets. Therefore, the longer it takes for a zombification to reboot your body, the more brain damage that zombie will have. Fast zombies, which traditionally ‘turn’ very quickly then can move the way they do because they have less brain damage than the slow zombies.”

To read the rest of Hill’s article, click here. Below is a 4-minute video of Hill explaining his Walking Dead theory. Who knows, he might be right!

[youtube:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HG9BbvW2tco]

 

We’re not the only ones obsessed with Zombies

imagesSure, we might not completely understand neuroscience, but knowing it has to do with the scientific study of the nervous system is good enough for most of us. We’re all also familiar with zombies, and I mean, how could we not be? AMC’s hit TV-show “The Walking Dead” has over 13 million viewers and countless zombie-based box office hits such as “Zombieland,” “I Am Legend,” and “World War Z,” suggest that while zombies are not taking over the world just yet, they are capturing our imagination. So what happens when we combine the field of neuroscience with the phenomenon that is “zombies?”

Enter Bradley Voytek, a UC San Diego neuroscientist whose “mutual love of zombies and brains has lead him to formalize the theoretical neuroanatomy of the zombie brain,”  according to the Zombie Research Society.

Wait a minute — zombies have a research society? Yes, it turns out the Zombie Research Society (ZRS) is an organization, founded by Matt Mogk, that dedicates itself to the “historic, cultural, and scientific study of the living dead.” On its website you will find zombie survival strategies, theories on historical outbreaks, and scientific articles on various subjects such as vaccines and Ebola. There’s even a list of the top 10 safest countries to live in during a world-wide zombie outbreak. (The US ranks 3rd just behind Canada and Australia)

Keen-eyed readers will also discover that Bradley Voytek is on the advisory board of the ZRS and that he will soon publish Do Zombies Dream of Undead Sheep?: A Neuroscientific View of the Zombie Brain, a popular science book that references zombie popular culture to help answer neuroscientific questions regarding brain function during sleep, the nature of sensory perception, and much more. You can sample some of this unique book here.

This is not the first zombie book we have published, nor will it be the last. You may wish to check out our other undead titles below.


 

bookjacket Do Zombies Dream of Undead Sheep?
A Neuroscientific View of the Zombie Brain
Timothy Verstynen & Bradley Voytek
bookjacket Zombies and Calculus
Colin Adams
bookjacket Zombie Economics:
How Dead Ideas Still Walk among Us
John Quiggin
bookjacket Theories of International Politics and Zombies
Daniel W. Drezner