The Mystery of Snowfall Explained

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The view from my backyard.

We’re still in the midst of a blizzard — indeed Princeton University Press is actually closed for the day as we huddle down at home with 8-10 inches and counting on the ground. But what better time to share this opinion piece from Ian Roulstone, meteorologist and author of Invisible in the Storm. While we’re waiting for an opportunity to get out there and shovel, we hope you will enjoy this article about the strange world of snowfall prediction and why it can’t be more accurate:

A snow-covered landscape is one of the classic images showcasing the beauty of weather on Earth. We are awed by the grandeur of white-capped mountains and the almost magical quality of snow-covered trees. We are also frustrated when the tempests of winter reach far and wide, striking as they have done this year in America’s southern states.

When it comes to forecasting the likelihood of a blizzard, the weather anchors know what to say. But when asked to predict how much snow will actually accumulate, they will give estimates. Why?

Read the rest of the story at CNN.com.