What is your Amazon warrior name?

Inspired by new research by Adrienne Mayor, available for the first time in her forthcoming book The Amazons: Lives and Legends of Warrior Women across the Ancient World, we present this personality quiz. Leave a comment below with your Amazon alter ego. If you want to read more information about these women, please click here.

Migration Quiz Monday: The Swamp Answer

Ready for the big reveal? It’s time to find out where Scott Whittle and Tom Stephenson, co-authors of The Warbler Guide, found this bird call, and which of our three winged options it came from.


Audio Quiz: Swamp Answer

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QUIZ SONG – ONE SECTION OF REPEATED, 4-ELEMENT PHRASES – PITCH MOVES IN ONE DIRECTION.

So this is a 1-Section song. It consists of one Phrase that is repeated over and over. (A Phrase is a group of different Elements that are repeated several times.) The Phrase is intricate, with 4 Elements.

Notice that each Phrase covers a lot of frequencies, including some that are very low. The first Element of each Phrase looks like a very straight line. This indicates many frequencies being sung at the same time, creating a very strong accent or even noise-like sound. The Elements in the rest of the Phrase sound staccato, as they are short, and have a much smaller pitch range.  And they rise in pitch, one to the next.

All of the suggested species share this same basic structure: 1 Section with several repeated Phrases, each of which consists of a few Elements. Let’s first look at Kentucky Warbler and see if it fits.

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KENTUCKY WARBLER: THE ELEMENTS ARE LOW AND COMPRESSED IN PITCH RANGE.

The first thing we hear (and see) is that all of these Elements are very similar to each other. There is nothing like the variety of sound we hear in the target song. Also, the pitch is low and doesn’t cover nearly the same range, making the song sound duller and less strident.

Common Yellowthroat’s song does have a lot of variety in its Elements.

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COMMON YELLOWTHROAT: LESS ACCENTED, SLOWER, AND HIGHER, WITH UP/DOWN PITCH MOVEMENTS.

And it covers a very wide range of frequencies, although it doesn’t go nearly as low as the target song. Also, the Elements are somewhat longer, and thus sound less staccato or accented. The speed of the Phrases is also noticeably slower, in fact about half as fast. That enhances the more melodic quality of the Common Yellowthroat’s song.

Finally the pitch profile of each Phrase is a slower, more gentle, up/down form. All in all, Common Yellowthroat sounds more mellow or sing-songy than the target song, which has a very strong accent followed by a rapidly rising series of short Elements.

All of the features of the target song fit the various, variable songs of Carolina Wren. The key to identifying this species, and separating it from other species, is each Phrase’s very fast, sharp, accented Element that is then followed by a series of short Elements with either a rising or falling overall pitch profile. The fairly fast speed and wide pitch range, adds to the song’s effect.


And to check out the free downloads we’re currently offering, check out the links below:
Crossley ID Guide Raptors : A sampler raptor guide in PDF format
Quick Finders from The Warbler Guide : A ‘quick finder’ designed to help you identify over 50 warblers faster with targeted color photos.

Migration Quiz Monday: The Swamp Question

After a short hiatus, we’re back with Migration Quiz Monday! Hope you don’t get too stumped by this birdcall, along with a couple distinguishing features. Have a guess? Comment below and check back later this week for the answer!


Audio Quiz: Swamp Question

carwre quiz fin

Click Here To Listen

This species is a very vocal singer, has many variations, and is often confused with other species, especially from the distance. This one Section song could be Common Yellowthroat, Kentucky Warbler or even Carolina Wren. Which is it?

COMYEL_042608#2KENWAR100422_35CARWRE_022009#10

(click to enlarge)


And to check out the free downloads we’re currently offering, check out the links below:
Crossley ID Guide Raptors : A sampler raptor guide in PDF format
Quick Finders from The Warbler Guide : A ‘quick finder’ designed to help you identify over 50 warblers faster with targeted color photos.

World Space Week Quiz Answers! #WSW2013

Dreams of Other WorldsIn case you’ve been sitting on the edge of your seat since you took our World Space Week Quiz, dying to know why you got a 91% instead of 100%, anticipate no longer! Check out the answers below and be sure to also pick up a copy of Chris Impey and Holly Henry’s brand new book, titled Dreams of Other Worlds: The Amazing Story of Unmanned Space Exploration.


1) Which unmanned spacecraft landed on Mars for the first time in US history in 1976?

Viking! The Viking probes were the first to orbit and touch down on Mars, taking high-res photos and exploring for any potential signs of life. (no signs of any Martian activity yet…)

2) Which space probe collected cosmic dust from the comet Wild 2 in 1999?

Stardust! The Stardust followed Wild 2 (a comet approximately 5 kilometers in diameter) to follow samples and take photos of its surface.

3) Which satellite was the first to map the stars and was named after a Greek astronomer?

Hipparcos! Named in reference to the Greek astronomer, Hipparchus, the Hipparcos contains various datasets for known stars, allowing us to catalog their position and distance.

4) Which two spacecrafts were known as the “Tireless Twins” for their long-distance exploration of other planet’s systems?

The Voyagers! This gruesome twosome was originally supposed to just explore Jupiter and Saturn, bu they ended up going all of the way out to Uranus and Neptune as well.

5) Which space telescope launched in 1999 allowed NASA to observe X-rays outside of Earth’s atmosphere?

Chandra! Known as one of the four “Great Observatories”, Chandra is still observing X-rays from space today.

6) Which spacecraft launched in 1995 monitors the “humming” of the Sun’s sound waves?

SOHO! The Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (or SOHO) both explores the outer layers of the Sun and gets readings of radiant energy (in the form of sound waves) to learn about its interior structure.

7) What two spacecrafts were the first of the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Missions to explore the surface and geology of Mars?

Spirit and Opportunity! This dynamic duo has been exploring the surface of Mars for quite some time, taking samples that help determine whether or not there was ever water on Mars, the general geology of the planet, and whether or not life could potentially be supported there.

8) Along with COBE, which spacecraft helps to map the radiant energy let off by the Big Bang?

WMAP! The WMAP measures differences in the temperature of the Big Bang’s remnant radiant heat in the sky to help us better understand the Big Bang as a model.

9) Which space telescope, launched in 2003, has the ability to see through interstellar dust to observe the distant formation of stars?

Spitzer! The Spitzer Space Telescope was the first infrared telescope of its time, allowing it to take photographs in space that were far better than any we had seen up until that point.

10) Which space telescope observes Earth atmosphere and has been in operation for over three decades?

Hubble! Probably the most famous of all the spacecrafts in this quiz, the Hubble Space Telescope is the only telescope designed to be serviced by astronauts in space.

11) Which spacecraft launched in 1997 orbits Saturn, exploring both the planet and its rings?

Cassini! After launching in 1997, it took Cassini seven years to reach Saturn’s orbit.


Proud of your score? Tweet it! #WSW2013


Want to see what these sorts of spacecrafts look like? Check out the infographic below!
00_impey_timeline

The Mystery Trill: Solution!

Recently posted on TheWarblerGuide.com as well, here is the answer to the mystery trill question posted earlier this week!
Plus don’t forget to check back here next week for our next Migration Quiz Monday!


Audio Question: Trills Answer

This song obviously has two different Sections. The first has 8 Elements. Although they are fairly fast, they are slow enough to be very distinct and it’s possible to imagine counting the number while it’s singing. The Elements are somewhat emphatic and bright, as they are Expanded and cover a large frequency range.

The second Section is lower, and way too fast to count; a trill. The pitch is fairly stable during both Sections.

It turns out this speed difference between the first and second Sections is an important clue.  Let’s first examine Orange-crowned Warbler’s song.

ORCWAR_121108#08-2

Many Orange-crowned songs have a similar form: 2 Sections, the second lower. However the speed is much different. Both Sections are so fast that it would be impossible to imagine counting the number of Elements. This characteristic: that all Sections of this species’ songs are sung at trill speed is a very good ID point.

Also, the pitch tends to drift and, in general, the Elements are less Expanded and thus less emphatic.

Based on these characteristics we can rule out Orange-crowned.

Nashville also has a similar song form: 2 Sections, the second lower.

NASWAR100425_07

However Nashville’s first Sections are quite different. Instead of short, fairly emphatic 1-Element Phrases, Nashville’s songs are almost always 2-Element Phrases. And the Phrase speed is considerably slower. This more deliberate speed, with 2-Element Phrases, makes it easy to separate Nashville from this song.

That leaves Wilson’s Warbler. Wilson sings a fairly wide range of songs. Many are only 1-Section, often falling in pitch towards the end. They also sing 2-Section songs like our target song.

WILWAR_102107#03-2

The key point is that the first Sections are fairly emphatic Phrases that are never fast enough to be a Trill. And although they can be somewhat intricate, the Phrases are never made up of 2 separate, repeated Elements.


Don’t forget to check out the free downloads we’re currently offering. Click on the links below:
Crossley ID Guide Raptors : A sampler raptor guide in PDF format
Quick Finders from The Warbler Guide : A ‘quick finder’ designed to help you identify over 50 warblers faster with targeted color photos.