Best-Selling books at PUP last week

These are the best-selling books for the past week.

Alan Turing: The Enigma, The Book That Inspired the Film The Imitation Game by Andrew Hodges
On Elizabeth Bishop by Colm Tóibín
The Transformation of the World: A Global History of the Nineteenth Century by Jürgen Osterhammel
The Original Folk and Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm edited by Jack Zipes
Tesla: Inventor of the Electrical Age by W. Bernard Carlson
“They Can Live in the Desert but Nowhere Else”: A History of the Armenian Genocide by Ronald Grigor Suny
Madness in Civilization: A Cultural History of Insanity, from the Bible to Freud, from the Madhouse to Modern Medicine by Andrew Scull
Efficiently Inefficient: How Smart Money Invests and Market Prices Are Determined by Lasse Heje Pedersen
On Bullshit by Harry G. Frankfurt
Irrational Exuberance by Robert J. Shiller

College Decision Day Book List

Happy May Day! Or, if you’re a high school senior, good luck with one of the biggest decisions of your academic career. Many high school seniors across the country are likely deciding what college they will attend today, and a number of books Princeton has published in higher education happen to be perfect reading to accompany their journey. College, by Andrew Delbanco looks at how college has evolved and where it’s heading. Higher Education in the Digital Age by William Bowen describes higher education’s transformation with technology, while Privilege by Shamus Khan and Pedigree by Lauren Rivera analyze elite culture in higher education and how it translates to the job market respectively. Happy reading & congratulations to high school seniors!

The History of American Higher Education Privilege
Higher Education in the Digital Age Pedigree
College Higher Education in America

Best Sellers

These are the best-selling books for the past week.

Alan Turing: The Enigma, The Book That Inspired the Film The Imitation Game by Andrew Hodges
The Original Folk and Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm edited by Jack Zipes
Tesla: Inventor of the Electrical Age by W. Bernard Carlson
Madness in Civilization: A Cultural History of Insanity, from the Bible to Freud, from the Madhouse to Modern Medicine by Andrew Scull
On Elizabeth Bishop by Colm Tóibín
Rational Ritual: Culture, Coordination, and Common Knowledge by Michael Suk-Young Chwe
One Day in the Life of the English Language: A Microcosmic Usage Handbook by Frank L. Cioffi
How to Solve It: A New Aspect of Mathematical Method by G. Polya
1177 BC: The Year Civilization Collapsed by Eric H. Cline
How to Clone a Mammoth: The Science of De-Extinction by Beth Shapiro

#WinnerWednesdays

In the past two weeks, our authors have received quite a few honors. Check out the complete list of awards:

Winner of the 2015 AAPOR Book Award, American Association for Public Opinion Research

  • Peter V. Marsden (Editor) – Social Trends in American Life: Findings from the General Social Survey since 1972

“The AAPOR Book Award seeks to recognize influential books that have stimulated theoretical and scientific research in public opinion; and/or influenced our understanding or application of survey research methodology.” Peter Marsden will be present at the May 16, 2015 “Meet the Author” session at the AAPOR annual conference in Hollywood, Florida. Check out the press release, here.

Honorable Mention for the 2015 René Wellek Prize, American Comparative Literature Association

  • Rivkah Zim - The Consolations of Writing: Literary Strategies of Resistance from Boethius to Primo Levi

“The René Wellek Prize recognizes an outstanding book in the discipline of comparative literature; fields may include literary or cultural theory or history, or any other field of comparative literature.” The award was announced at ACLA’s annual meeting in Seattle, WA in March 2015. Read the judges’ citation, here.

Shortlisted for the 2015 PEN/Diamonstein-Spielvogel Award for the Art of the Essay, Pen American Center

  • David Bromwich – Moral Imagination: Essays

The 2015 PEN/Diamonstein-Spielvogel Award is given “…for a book of essays published in 2014 that exemplifies the dignity and esteem that the essay form imparts to literature.” Judges: Diane Johnson, Dahlia Lithwick, Vijay Seshadri, Mark Slouka. The committee has narrowed down the long list of ten titles to five finalists. Winners of this particular award will be announced in June 8th at the PEN’s Literary Awards ceremony at The New School in New York City. More information about the full 2015 shortlists can be found, here.

Winner of the 2015 NAVSA Best book of the Year Award, North American Victorian Studies Association

  • Seth Koven, The Match Girl and the Heiress

“NAVSA is pleased to announce the annual prize for the best book of the year in Victorian studies. In addition to receiving complimentary registration and up to $1000 for travel, the winner of the NAVSA Best Book of the Year will be honored with a special session devoted to the book at the annual NAVSA conference. Books may be on any topic related to the study of Victorian Britain or its empire, and the winning book will be selected according to three criteria: (1) Potential significance for Victorian studies; (2) Quality and depth of scholarly research and interpretation; (3) Clarity and effectiveness of presentation. Only monographs are eligible; no essay collections or new editions.” View the online announcement here.

Winner of the 2015 Certificate of Merit for a Preeminent Contribution to Creative Scholarship, American Society of International Law

  • Karen J. Alter- The New Terrain of International Law: Courts, Politics, Rights

“The Society annually bestows three book awards, known as ASIL Certificates of Merit, for a “preeminent contribution to creative scholarship;” “a specialized area of international law;” and “high technical craftsmanship and utility to practicing lawyers and scholars.” The awardees are selected by the Society’s Executive Council on the nomination of the Scholarship Awards Committee and presented at the Society’s Annual Meeting.” View the online announcement here.

Winner of the 2014 Best First Book, Immigration and Ethnic History Society

  • Ellen D. Wu – The Color of Success: Asian Americans and the Origins of the Model Minority

Ellen Wu is the first winner of this new prize. She was presented with the award at the IEHS annual dinner. “The Immigration and Ethnic History Society announces a new prize to recognize the work of early career scholars in the field of U.S. immigration and ethnic history. The 2014 “First Book Award” award will be presented to the book judged best on any aspect of the immigration and ethnic history of the United States and/or North America. To be eligible for the award, a book must be copyrighted 2014, must be based on substantial primary research, must present a major new scholarly interpretation, and must be an author’s first academic monograph. The $2000 award will be presented at the annual dinner meeting of the Society in April 2015.”

Honorable Mention for the 2015 Delmos Jones and Jagna Scharff Memorial Book Award, Society for the Anthropology of North America

  • Kenneth T. MacLeish – Making War at Fort Hood, Life and Uncertainty in a Military Community

“The Delmos Jones and Jagna Sharf Memorial Prize for the Critical Study of North America is awarded every two years for a single or multiple authored book (not edited collections). Books should deal with an important social issue within the discipline of anthropology, have broader implications for social change or justice, and be accessible beyond the discipline of anthropology.” Awards were presented at the Spring 2015 SANA meetings in New York City on April 17th.

Winner of the 2015 AERA Division J Outstanding Publication Award, American Education Research Association

  • Roger L. Geiger – The History of American Higher Education: Learning and Culture from the Founding to World War II

Roger Geiger’s book was selected from a group of eight finalists. “The purpose of this award is to bestow recognition on a colleague for a specific publication (book, book chapter, or journal article) judged as making a substantial contribution to the literature and/or practice of higher education.” Awards were presented last week at the Division J Business meeting at AERA in Chicago. Read the official announcement in “The Pen” Spring 2015 newsletter of AERA Division J Post-secondary Education.

Selected for the 2015 Over the Rainbow Project book list, American Library Association

  • Amin Ghaziani – There Goes the Gayborhood?

“The 2015 Over the Rainbow Project book list, sponsored by the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Round Table (GLBTRT) of the American Library Association (ALA), has been decided at ALA’s Midwinter Meeting in Chicago. This year’s list includes 78 titles published between July 1, 2013 and December 31, 2014. The committee’s mission is to create a bibliography of books that exhibit commendable literary quality and significant authentic GLBT content and are recommended for adults over age 18. It is not meant to be all-inclusive but is intended as an annual core list for readers and librarians searching for recommendations for a cross-section of the year’s titles. Although the committee attempts to present titles for a variety of reading tastes and levels, no effort is made to balance this bibliography according to subject, area of interest, age, or genre.” Read more about the award on the website.

 

Congratulations to the authors and books that have won awards!

 

#NewBooks

Books released during the week of April 13, 2015

Among this week’s new releases is a big one for classics buffs, Josiah Ober’s The Rise and Fall of Classical Greece, one of Flavorwire’s 10 must-read academic books for 2015. You can read Chapter 1 here. Also out is Pedigree: How Elite Students Get Elite Jobs by Lauren A. Rivera, which goes behind the closed doors of top-tier investment banks, consulting firms, and law firms to reveal the truth about who really has a chance at scoring the nation’s highest-paying entry level jobs. If you think, like many Americans, that working hard is the path to upward mobility, guess again. As Mitchell Stevens, author of Creating a Class writes, “Rivera shows how educational stratification in the United States is particularly pronounced and caste-like at the gateway to elite professions, and how the boundary between elite colleges and the elite firms that recruit from them is so fuzzy as to be only ceremonial.” Read Chapter 1 here.

New in Hardcover

Modern Observational Physical Oceanography Pedigree
The Rise and Fall of Classical Greece Teaching Plato in Palestine

New in Paperback

The Great Mother

Celebrate Passover with “Skies of Parchment, Seas of Ink: Jewish Illuminated Manuscripts”

Skies of Parchment, Seas of Ink: Jewish Illustrated Manuscripts edited by Marc Michael Epstein, the Mattie M. Paschall (1899) and Norman Davis Chair of Religion and Visual Culture at Vassar College, provides the first full survey of Jewish illuminated manuscripts—from hand illustrated versions of the Bible, to beloved Jewish texts, to marriage documents—ranging from their origins in the Middle Ages to the present day. The illustrations are magnificent. As Passover is occurring now through Saturday, Marc Epstein provided us background on a handful of particularly arresting images. More information on Passover can be found here, and you can read chapter one here.

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Miriam and the daughters of Israel singing at the shore of the Red Sea. Haggadah. ("The Golden Haggadah"). Spain, Barcelona, c. 1320. London, British Library, MS Add. 27210, fol. 15r.

Seder scene. Haggadah (The Brother Haggadah). Catalonia, third quarter of the 14th century. London, British Library, MS Add. Or. 1404, fol. 8v.

Family and Moorish servant at the Seder table. The first significant treatment medieval Jewish book arts focused on this manuscript, which as still to yield up many of its mysteries. Haggadah. (The Sarejevo Haggadah). Spain, Catalonia, c. 1350. Bosnia and Hercegovnia, Sarajevo, Zemaljski Museum, ms 1, fol. 31v. CLEARED FOR USE.

Moses and Aaron before Pharaoh. Spatial and figural renderings of the sort labeled by some scholars as "primitive." Haggadah (The Hispano-Moresque Haggadah). Spain, Castile, ca. 1300. London, British Library, MS Or. 2737, fol. 74v.

Death of the Egyptian firstborn and the Exodus. Haggadah (The Golden Haggadah). Spain, Barcelona, ca. 1320. London, British Library, MS Add. 27210, fol. 14v, c and d.

"We were slaves to Pharaoh in Egypt." The lower margin and central illustration depicts the slaving Israelites, while at top, a hare is served a drink by a dog, perhaps articulating the wish that "one day the Egyptian dogs will serve us." Haggadah. ("The Barcelona Haggadah"). Spain, Barcelona, c. 1340. London, British Library, MS add. 14761, fol. 30v.

Israelites building store-cities for Pharaoh. Haggadah illustrated by Joseph Bar David of Leipnick, Moravia. Germany, Altona, 1740. London, British Library, MS Sloane 3173, fol. 11v.

Barbara Wolff. "The gods." The ancient Egyptian religion centered on the idea of birth, death, and rebirth in an afterlife. Just as the people daily life depended on the annual flooding and receding of the waters of the Nile, the Egyptian pantheon of many gods guided and protected all aspects of nature and human existence. From a relatively early time, haggadot have included archaeological details, with lesser or (as here) greater degrees of accuracy. There is a certain irony, it must be admitted, in depicting the very gods that are described as being "judged" and obviated by God in Exodus and in the text of the haggadah, as if perpetuating the memory of that which we are enjoined to forget. Daniel and Joanna S. Rose Haggadah, 2013, 19.

Barbara Wolff. "In Remembrance" On the night of "Broken Glass" (Kristallnacht 9-10 November 1938), over a thousand synagogues were looted and burned in Germany, Austria, and Poland. Jewish shops were smashed, many Jews were killed, and over thirty thousand taken to concentration camps. It marked the beginning of the Holocaust in which over seven million Jews perished. Barbara Wolff's illumination calls on us to remember this dark chapter of Jewish history by incorporating images of several of the synagogues that were attacked. The traditional text, "Pour out Your wrath on the nations that do not know you," is supplemented with a text calling upon God to pour out "love upon the nations that know You." This prayer was allegedly discovered in a beautiful haggadah manuscript on parchment dated 1521, which had been lost during the Holocaust, but this story seems, unforutnately to have been a fabrication, the prayer having been composed around 1928 by Rabbi Bloch (1881-c. 1970). Still, the sentiment is a beautiful one, and Block's prayer is worth translating: "Pour out your love on the nations that know You and on the kingdoms that call Your name. For the good which they do for the seed of Jacob, and [the manner in which] they shield Your people Israel from their enemies. May they merit to see the good of Your chosen, and to rejoice in the joy of Your nation. Daniel and Joanna S. Rose Haggadah, 2013, 38.

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#NewBooks

Books released during the week of April 6, 2015

Among this week’s new releases is the highly anticipated Note Book, which arguably raises the Facebook post to the level of art form. A collection of short essays from the Notes section of Princeton English professor Jeff Nunokawa’s Facebook page, Note Book is, in the words of Publisher’s Weekly, “[A] winning look at how people connect, or attempt to connect, in person and online.” Check out this and other new releases, including The Proof in the Pudding by Jim Henle, which combines the pleasures of mathematics and cooking, and The Good Immigrants by Madeline Hsu, which offers a timely look at the shifts in immigration laws and perceptions of cultural traits that enabled Asians to remain in the United States.

New in Hardcover:

Note Book The Politics of Precaution
The Good Immigrants Human Nature & Jewish Thought
The Proof and the Pudding Life's Engines
Social Evolution and Inclusive Fitness Theory Strangers No More

New in Paperback:

A Century of Genocide The Essential Hirschman
The Kingdon Field Guide to African Mammals The Muqaddimah
Nations under God Telsa
War and Democratic Constraint

Weekly Bestsellers

These are the best-selling books for the past week.

Alan Turing: The Enigma, The Book That Inspired the Film The Imitation Game by Andrew Hodges
The Original Folk and Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm edited by Jack Zipes
Climate Shock: The Economic Consequences of a Hotter Planet by Gernot Wagner & Martin L. Weitzman
Irrational Exuberance: Revised and Expanded Third edition by Robert J. Shiller
On Elizabeth Bishop by Colm Tóibín
Mostly Harmless Econometrics: An Empiricist’s Companion by Joshua D. Angrist & Jörn-Steffen Pischke
How to Solve It: A New Aspect of Mathematical Method by G. Polya
On Bullshit by Harry G. Frankfurt
1177 BC: The Year Civilization Collapsed by Eric H. Cline
QED: The Strange Theory of Light and Matter by Richard P. Feynman

PUP Display at Harvard Bookstore

Well here are two good things that go great together. Princeton University Press book lovers in the Boston area will be happy to see the Harvard Book Store has a lovely display of our new releases up in their store window. Purchase a copy of How to Clone a Mammoth, Climate Shock, On Elizabeth Bishop, One Day in the Life of the English Language, as well as other new releases.

PUP at HarvardPhoto Credit: Harvard Book Store

#WinnerWednesdays

In the past two weeks, our authors have received quite a few honors. Check out the complete list of awards:

Winner of the 2015 Prize of the Leipzig Book Fair:

  • Philipp Ther – The New Order on the Old Continent: A History of NeoLiberal Europe

The Leipzig Book Fair is Germany’s second largest book event (after Frankfurt). This year’s festival attracted 186,000 visitors over four days. Two major book prizes are awarded; the Leipzig Book Fair Prize is awarded in three categories (fiction/poetry, translation, nonfiction). The three winners share a 60,000 prize. More information about the Leipzig Book Fair and Book Prizes can be found, here.

Winners of the Axiom Business Book Awards:

  • Winner of the 2015 Gold Medal in Economics: Eswar S. Prasad – The Dollar Trap: How the U.S. Dollar Tightened Its Grip on Global Finance
  • Winner of the 2015 Gold Medal in Networking: Mikolaj Jan Piskorski – A Social Strategy: How We Profit from Social Media
  • Winner of the 2015 Bronze Medal in Economics: Diane Coyle – GDP: A Brief but Affectionate History

The Jenkins Group Inc. has announced the results of the eighth annual, 2015 Axiom Business Book Awards, designed to honor the year’s best business books published during the past year. Axiom Awards come with gold, silver, and bronze medal designations within each category. This year’s medalists will be recognized at an award ceremony event to be held in New York on Wednesday May 27th on the eve of the BookExpo America convention. A full list of the 2015 Awards winners can be found, here.

Longlisted for the 2015 PEN/Diamonstein-Spielvogel Award for the Art of the Essay, PEN American Center:

  • David Bromwich – Moral Imagination: Essays

The 2015 PEN/Diamonstein-Spielvogel Award is given “…for a book of essays published in 2014 that exemplifies the dignity and esteem that the essay form imparts to literature.” Finalists will be announced on April 15th. For more information about the full 2015 longlists, click here.

Winner of the 2014 AAG Globe Book Award for Public Understanding of Geography, Association of American Geographers

  • Paul Knox (Editor) – Atlas of Cities

“The Globe Award recognizes one book published last year that conveys most powerfully the nature and importance of geography to the nonacademic world.” For more information about the award click, here.

Princeton University Press has been shortlisted for the 2015 International Academic and Professional Publisher Award of the LBF International Excellence Awards, London Book Fair in partnership with the UK Publishers Association

The Awards are organized by the London Book Fair, in partnership with the UK Publishers Association. These awards, new to The London Book Fair in 2014, celebrate achievement across the entire business of publishing, providing a truly global industry vision. Finalists in the 15 categories were announced March 19th. Winners will be revealed at an invitation-only ceremony at the London Book Fair on April 14th. The full list of nominees can be found, here.

Honorable Mention for the 2015 J. Willard Hurst Book Prize, Law and Society Association:

  • Ekaterina Pravilova – A Public Empire: Property and the Quest for the Common Good in Imperial Russia

“…the Hurst Prize is given to the best work in socio-legal history. The field of socio-legal history is broadly defined to include the history of interrelationships between law and social, economic, and political change; the history of functions and impact of legal agencies, legislative and administrative as well as judicial; the social history of the legal profession; and similar topics.” More information about the Law & Society Association Awards can be found, here.

 

Congratulations to the authors and books that have won awards!

#NewBooks

Books released during the week of March 2, 2015

New Hardcovers

bookjacket In-Your-Face Politics:
The Consequences of Uncivil Media

Diana C. Mutz

“With ample humor and sufficient exposition for a lay audience, she conducts and analyzes a series of experiments carefully crafted to study how extreme close-ups and uncivil behavior in political TV affect the public discourse. . . . An approachable yet scientifically rigorous look at what passes for political discourse in America.”–Kirkus

 

bookjacket On Elizabeth Bishop
Colm Tóibín

“Novelist Tóibín (Nora Webster) gives an intimate and engaging look at Elizabeth Bishop’s poetry and its influence on his own work. . . . Tóibín is also present in the book, and his relationship to Bishop’s work and admiration of her style gives the book much of its power. Whether one is familiar with Bishop’s life and work or is looking to Tóibín to learn more, this book will appeal to many readers.”–Publishers Weekly starred review

 

bookjacket Pagans and Philosophers:
The Problem of Paganism from Augustine to Leibniz

John Marenbon

“In this book, John Marenbon exhibits remarkable erudition and a formidable command of the relevant texts, both scholastic and literary. He is adept at setting out complex issues in a clear way, and his book incorporates much little-known and fascinating material in the history of ideas.”–Anthony Kenny, author of A New History of Western Philosophy

 

bookjacket Pleasure and Piety:
The Art of Joachim Wtewael

James Clifton, Liesbeth M. Helmus & Arthur K. Wheelock Jr.
With contributions by Stijn Alsteens & Anne W. Lowenthal

“The definitive study of one of the period’s most significant artists.”–H. Rodney Nevitt Jr., University of Houston

 

bookjacket Still Lives:
Death, Desire, and the Portrait of the Old Master

Maria H. Loh

“This ambitious and complex book opens up the study of the Italian Renaissance with renewed theoretical and scholarly vigor. Maria Loh paints a vivid portrait of the messy politics of studio culture and the new pictorial economies resulting from the printing press.”–Todd Olson, University of California, Berkeley

 

bookjacket “They Can Live in the Desert but Nowhere Else”:
A History of the Armenian Genocide

Ronald Grigor Suny

“[A] deeply researched, fair-minded study. . . . Suny creates a compelling narrative of vengeance and terror.”–Kirkus, starred review

 

bookjacket Watchdogs on the Hill:
The Decline of Congressional Oversight of U.S. Foreign Relations

Linda L. Fowler

“Examining the evolution and deterioration of oversight on the Senate side of the Capitol, this thorough and theoretically grounded work offers systematic insight into the national security watchdog that doesn’t always bark. Fowler’s call to ‘renew foreign policy oversight’ will be deeply interesting to scholars, practitioners, and citizens alike.”–Christopher J. Deering, George Washington University

 

bookjacket White Backlash:
Immigration, Race, and American Politics

Marisa Abrajano & Zoltan L. Hajnal

White Backlash is one of the best books I have read in the last half century. Based on rigorous analyses of multiple data sets and presented in remarkably clear prose, the book advances a compelling and original argument that will change the way we talk about immigration and electoral politics. I highly recommend this important work to anyone seeking an understanding of the current and growing racial divide in U.S. politics.”–Willliam Julius Wilson, author of More than Just Race

 

bookjacket Analytical Psychology in Exile:
The Correspondence of C. G. Jung and Erich Neumann

C. G. Jung & Erich Neumann
Edited and introduced by Martin Liebscher
Translated by Heather McCartney

“Erich Neumann’s place in the history of analytical psychology may finally find the positive reassessment it deserves via this collection of his correspondence with Carl Jung….Perhaps most importantly, these letters allow us to see a mutually enriching exchange of ideas that formed a significant, though under appreciated, passage of intellectual history. This is essential reading for anyone interested in the theoretical origins of psychoanalysis.” –Publishers Weekly

 

bookjacket  The Collected Papers of Albert Einstein, Volume 14:
The Berlin Years: Writings & Correspondence, April 1923–May 1925 (English Translation Supplement)

Documentary edition
Albert Einstein
Edited by Diana Kormos Buchwald, József Illy, Ze’ev Rosenkranz, Tilman Sauer & Osik Moses
Translated by Ann M. Hentschel & Jennifer Nollar James
Klaus Hentschel, consultant

In almost one hundred writings and more than one thousand letters included in this volume, Einstein is revealed yet again as the consummate puzzler of myriad scientific problems as well as the invested participant in social and political engagements.

 

bookjacket  Foragers, Farmers, and Fossil Fuels:
How Human Values Evolve

Updated edition
Ian Morris
Edited and with an introduction by Stephen Macedo
With commentary by Richard Seaford, Jonathan D. Spence, Christine M. Korsgaard, and Margaret Atwood

“A provocative explanation for the evolution and divergence of ethical values. . . . In the hands of this talented writer and thinker, [the] material becomes an engaging intellectual adventure.”–Kirkus


bookjacket  From Ancient to Modern:
Archaeology and Aesthetics

Edited by Jennifer Y. Chi & Pedro Azara

This beautifully illustrated volume is the accompanying catalog for the exhibition at New York University’s Institute for the Study of the Ancient World and focuses on fifty objects from three iconic sites in the ancient Near East: Ur, Diyala, and Kish.


New Paperbacks

bookjacket

Heart Beats:
Everyday Life and the Memorized Poem

Catherine Robson

“It’s tempting to sentimentalize an era in which poetry–memorized, recited poetry–held so prominent a place in the culture. But its once-substantial role turns out to be a mixed and complicated tale, as thoroughly chronicled [by] Catherine Robson.”–Brad Leithauser, NewYorker.com
bookjacket

Flatland:
A Romance of Many Dimensions

Edwin Abbott Abbott
With an introduction by Thomas Banchoff

“One of the most imaginative, delightful and, yes, touching works of mathematics, this slender 1884 book purports to be the memoir of A. Square, a citizen of an entirely two-dimensional world.”–The Washington Post Book World
bookjacket Extinction:
How Life on Earth Nearly Ended 250 Million Years Ago

Updated edition
Douglas H. Erwin
With a new preface by the author

“Theories and mysteries can be dispelled with good data from the geologic record, and Erwin (a paleobiologist at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of Natural History) offers an authoritative account of the search for these data and for the cause of the extinction. . . . Extinction provides a great reference for researchers and the interested lay reader alike.”–Andrew M. Bush, Science

 

bookjacket The Confidence Trap:
A History of Democracy in Crisis from World War I to the Present

Updated edition
David Runciman
With a new afterword by the author

“His rich and refreshing book will be of intense interest to anyone puzzled by the near paralysis that seems to afflict democratic government in a number of countries, not least the United States. Runciman’s account of the workings of the confidence trap-the belief that democracy will always survive-will serve as an antidote to the moods of alarm and triumph by which writers on democracy are regularly seized.” –John Gray, New York Review of Books

 

bookjacket Life on a Young Planet:
The First Three Billion Years of Evolution on Earth

Updated edition
Andrew H. Knoll
With a new preface by the author

“A fascinating book. . . . The catastrophic surface narrative of this impressive and intriguing book would surely have pleased Stephen Jay Gould; but I think its deterministic subtext would have pleased Charles Darwin still more.”–Matt Cartmill, Times Literary Supplement

 

bookjacket

Mass Flourishing:
How Grassroots Innovation Created Jobs, Challenge, and Change

Edmund Phelps

“The book eloquently discusses the culture of innovation, which can refer to both an entrepreneurial mind-set and the cultural achievements during an age of change. . . . The dismal science becomes a little brighter when Mr. Phelps draws the connections between the economic ferment of the industrial age and the art of Beethoven, Verdi and Rodin.”–Edward Glaeser, Wall Street Journal
bookjacket

Political Bubbles:
Financial Crises and the Failure of American Democracy

Nolan McCarty, Keith T. Poole & Howard Rosenthal

“As pundits debate the causes of the 2008 economic crisis, the authors contend that financial crises have inherently political dimensions. McCarty, Poole, and Rosenthal argue persuasively that political bubbles and market bubbles are highly similar, with policy biases contributing to and amplifying market behavior. . . . The authors provide an exhaustive review of structural problems that they believe impede effective government response to new catastrophic economic developments. Their arguments transcend the academic to include historical precedents and specifics on Wall Street machinations.”–Publishers Weekly
bookjacket Thinking About the Presidency:
The Primacy of Power

William G. Howell
With David Milton Brent
With a new preface by the author

Thinking about the Presidency is a relatively brief book which would do well in any survey-level course on executive leadership or the structure of American government. . . . By looking at the presidency through the lens of expanding presidential power, Howell and Brent left this reader asking for more: such as why government works this way or why Congress reacts as it does. That it leaves open those questions indicates that this book is a valuable addition to any graduate-level course.”–Seth Offenbach, Journal of American Studies

 

bookjacket Higher Education in America
Revised edition
Derek Bok

“Magisterial.”–Stanley Fish, New York Times

 

bookjacket

Beyond the Brain:
How Body and Environment Shape Animal and Human Minds

Louise Barrett

Beyond the Brain is an astonishingly good book, both substantive and fun to read….Barrett re-centers the field on the study of animal cognition. I think this is an excellent decision, and not just because it allows her to tell some great animal stories. The main advantage is not narrative but substantive: her careful reconstruction of the grounds of natural cognition is simply more convincing and more relevant than even the best discussion of artificial intelligence could ever be….Beyond the Brain is full of…interesting and heterodox discussions, and is sure to engage, enrage, and inspire in differential measure depending on the reader’s theoretical proclivities.” –Michael L. Anderson, Journal of Consciousness Studies 
bookjacket

Cells to Civilizations:
The Principles of Change That Shape Life

Enrico Coen

“This attempt at a grand theoretical synthesis within biology explores the transformative powers and creative forces that have brought about the living world from the first cells to the latest developments in cultural and technological evolution…[Coen’s] eloquently written book offers a programmatic synthesis and an empirically grounded proposal for a theory of biology….Cells to Civilizations will stimulate many productive discussions about the origins and development of life in all its complexities.” -Manfred D. Laubichler, Science
bookjacket

An Uncertain Glory:
India and its Contradictions

Jean Drèze & Amartya Sen

“It’s an urgent, passionate, political work that makes the case that India cannot move forward without investing significantly–as every other major industrialized country has already done–in public services….This book is…a heartfelt plea to rethink what progress in a poor country ought to look like.” –Jyoti Thottam, New York Times Book Review

Win a copy of The Original Folk & Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm

In anticipation of Cinderella‘s movie release on March 13, we are giving away a copy of The Original Folk & Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm. The total value of this prize is $35.00.

How to win? There are three ways to enter: visit The Original Folk & Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm’s Facebook page; email us at blog@press.princeton.edu; or follow @PrincetonUPress on Twitter. Just follow the steps in the Rafflecopter box below. The winner will be selected on March 5, 2015.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

[Update: This giveaway has concluded and the winner has been notified, 3/4/15]


 

bookjacket

The Original Folk and Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm:
The Complete First Edition
Jacob & Wilhelm Grimm, Translated and edited by Jack Zipes
Illustrated by Andrea Dezsö