Princeton University Press’s best-selling titles for the last week

These are the best-selling books for the past week.

 

GDP: A Brief but Affectionate History by Diane Coyle
Tesla: Inventor of the Electrical Age by W. Bernard Carlson Tesla: Inventor of the Electrical Age by W. Bernard Carlson
On Bullshit by Harry G. Frankfurt
The Limits of Partnership: U.S.-Russian Relations in the Twenty-First Century by Angela E. Stent
Fragile by Design: The Political Origins of Banking Crises and Scarce Credit by Charles W. Calomiris & Stephen H. Haber
1177 BC: The Year Civilization Collapsed by Eric H. Cline
Rare Birds of North America by Steve Howell, Ian Lewington, and Will Russell
Revolutionary Ideas: An Intellectual History of the French Revolution from The Rights of Man to Robespierre by Jonathan Israel
The Dollar Trap: How the U.S. Dollar Tightened Its Grip on Global Finance by Eswar S. Prasad
The Box: How the Shipping Container Made the World Smaller and the World Economy Bigger by Marc Levinson

Princeton University Press’s Best-selling Books for the Past Week

These are the best-selling books for the past week.

 

Rare Birds of North America by Steve Howell, Ian Lewington, and Will Russell
k8967
Ten Thousand Birds: Ornithology since Darwin
by Tim Birkhead, Jo Wimpenny, and Bob Montgomerie
Beautiful Geometry by Eli Maor and Eugen Jost
The Dollar Trap: How the U.S. Dollar Tightened Its Grip on Global Finance by Eswar S. Prasad
Tesla: Inventor of the Electrical Age by W. Bernard Carlson Tesla: Inventor of the Electrical Age by W. Bernard Carlson
The Founder’s Dilemmas: Anticipating and Avoiding the Pitfalls That Can Sink a Startup by Noam Wasserman
What W.H. Auden Can Do for You by Alexander McCall-Smith
The Box: How the Shipping Container Made the World Smaller and the World Economy Bigger by Marc Levinson
The 5 Elements of Effective Thinking by Edward Burger and Michael Starbird
On Bullshit by Harry G. Frankfurt

Princeton University Press wins big at the 2014 PROSE Awards

American_PROSE_awards_logo[1] The Professional and Scholarly Publishing (PSP) Division of the Association of American Publishers (AAP) announced the 2013 PROSE Award Winners yesterday at the PSP Annual Conference in Washington, D.C.  According to the PROSE press release, the 2013 PROSE Awards received a record-breaking 535 entries—more than ever before in its 38-year history—in more than 40 categories. For full information about the 2013 PROSE Award winners: http://www.proseawards.com/current-winners.html

Princeton University Press won top awards in 3 Book Subject Categories, and received 11 Honorable Mention awards—a total of 14 awards. We are so happy to congratulate our authors:

 

3 Category Award Winners

Robert Bartlett, Why Can the Dead Do Such Great Things?
Winner of the 2013 PROSE Award in European and World History, Association of American Publishers

Thomas G. Pavel, The Lives of the Novel
Winner of the 2013 PROSE Award in Literature, Association of American Publishers

Anat Admati and Martin Hellwig, The Bankers’ New Clothes
Winner of the 2013 PROSE Award in Business, Finance & Management, Association of American Publishers

 

11 Honorable Mention Winners

S. Frederick Starr, Lost Enlightenment
Honorable Mention for the 2013 PROSE Award in European and World History, Association of American Publishers

John Sides and Lynn Vavreck, The Gamble
Honorable Mention for the 2013 PROSE Award in Government & Politics, Association of American Publishers

Ruth R. Wisse, No Joke
Honorable Mention for the 2013 PROSE Award in Language & Linguistics, Association of American Publishers

W. Bernard Carlson, Tesla
Honorable Mention for the 2013 PROSE Award in Biography & Autobiography, Association of American Publishers

Jeremy Adelman, Worldly Philosopher
Honorable Mention for the 2013 PROSE Award in Biography & Autobiography, Association of American Publishers

Katrina van Grouw, The Unfeathered Bird
Honorable Mention for the 2013 PROSE Award in Biological Sciences, Association of American Publishers

Lance Fortnow, The Golden Ticket
Honorable Mention for the 2013 PROSE Award in Popular Science & Mathematics, Association of American Publishers

Jeremiah P. Ostriker and Simon Mitton, Heart of Darkness
Honorable Mention for the 2013 PROSE Award in Cosmology & Astronomy, Association of American Publishers

Tom Stephenson and Scott Whittle, The Warbler Guide
Honorable Mention for the 2013 PROSE Award in Single Volume Reference/Science, Association of American Publishers

Angus Deaton, The Great Escape
Honorable Mention for the 2013 PROSE Award in Economics, Association of American Publishers

William B. Helmreich, The New York Nobody Knows
Honorable Mention for the 2013 PROSE Award in Sociology & Social Work, Association of American Publishers

Princeton University Press’s Best-Selling Titles for the Past Week

These are the best-selling books for the past week.

 

The Founder’s Dilemmas: Anticipating and Avoiding the Pitfalls That Can Sink a Startup by Noam Wasserman
The Box: How the Shipping Container Made the World Smaller and the World Economy Bigger by Marc Levinson
k10054 The Great Escape: Health, Wealth, and the Origins of Inequality by Angus Deaton
What W.H. Auden Can Do for You by Alexander McCall-Smith
Tesla: Inventor of the Electrical Age by W. Bernard Carlson Tesla: Inventor of the Electrical Age by W. Bernard Carlson
On Bullshit by Harry G. Frankfurt
The Dollar Trap: How the U.S. Dollar Tightened Its Grip on Global Finance by Eswar S. Prasad
The New York Nobody Knows: Walking 6,000 Miles in the City by William B. Helmreich
k8967
This Time Is Different: Eight Centuries of Financial Folly
by Carmen M. Reinhart & Kenneth S. Rogoff
Beautiful Geometry by Eli Maor and Eugen Jost

Princeton University Press’s Best-selling Titles for the Last Week

These are the best-selling books for the past week.

 

What W.H. Auden Can Do for You by Alexander McCall-Smith
Beautiful Geometry by Eli Maor and Eugen Jost
Tesla: Inventor of the Electrical Age by W. Bernard Carlson Tesla: Inventor of the Electrical Age by W. Bernard Carlson
Maimonides: Life and Thought by Moshe Halbertal
The Princeton Dictionary of Buddhism by Robert E. Buswell Jr. & Donald S. Lopez Jr.
Oxygen: A Four Billion Year History by Donald E. Canfield
k10054 The Great Escape: Health, Wealth, and the Origins of Inequality by Angus Deaton
The 5 Elements of Effective Thinking by Edward Burger and Michael Starbird
On Bullshit by Harry G. Frankfurt
k8967
Mostly Harmless Econometrics: An Empiricist’s Companion
by Joshua D. Angrist & Jörn-Steffen Pischke

Princeton University Press’s Best-Selling Books

These are the best-selling books for the past week.

 

Would You Kill the Fat Man?: The Trolley Problem and What Your Answer Tells Us about Right and Wrong by David Edmonds
The Founder’s Dilemmas: Anticipating and Avoiding the Pitfalls That Can Sink a Startup by Noam Wasserman
Tesla: Inventor of the Electrical Age by W. Bernard Carlson Tesla: Inventor of the Electrical Age by W. Bernard Carlson
Helmreich_NewYork The New York Nobody Knows: Walking 6,000 Miles in the City by William B. Helmreich
QED: The Strange Theory of Light and Matter by Richard P. Feynman
On Bullshit by Harry G. Frankfurt
k8967 Einstein and the Quantum: The Quest of the Valiant Swabian by A. Douglas Stone
Stephenson_WarblerG The Warbler Guide by Tom Stephenson & Scott Whittle
k10054 The Great Escape: Health, Wealth, and the Origins of Inequality by Angus Deaton
Undiluted Hocus-Pocus: The Autobiography of Martin Gardner by Martin Gardner

Migration Quiz Monday: It’s a Feathered Frenzy!

Stephenson_WarblerGGreetings bird-lovers! I know technically it’s Thursday (Happy Thanksgiving and first day of Hanukkah by the way!), but today is our ultimate Migration Quiz Monday! Our favorite warblers experts, Tom Stephenson and Scott Whittle, authors of The Warbler Guide, have been incredibly busy touring for their book and attending birding festivals, while still trying to fit in their favorite pastime, birding!

They finally got a chance to post a slew of quiz questions and answers on their blog a few days ago, but rather than posting each one and crowding up your nest- I mean computer screen- with links and posts and bird puns, I thought it would be easier if I gave you just one simple link to click on and check out all of their quizzes at once at The Warbler Guide.com. Enjoy!


And to check out the free downloads we’re currently offering, check out the links below:
Crossley ID Guide Raptors : A sampler raptor guide in PDF format including photos and real text from the guide
Quick Finders from The Warbler Guide : A ‘quick finder’ designed to help you identify over 50 warblers faster with targeted color photos


Derek Lovitch’s Rarity Season So Far

How To Be A Better BirderAccording to Derek Lovitch, author of How to Be a Better Birder and blogger for Maine Birding Field Notes, Rarity Season has been great this year for birders. He’s been avidly posting on his Facebook page about his finds, but in case you haven’t been following along, here’s a little summation thus far that he recently posted to his blog.


Rarity Season-to-date in Review

I hope you didn’t think that my lack of blogging of late equated to a lack of birding!  Quite the contrary, actually – it is Rarity Season afterall!  I’ve just been posting more frequent, shorter updates on our store’s Facebook page (you can scroll through the timeline here to see recent posts), especially since I have found myself a bit over-extended with a variety of other projects at the moment – I’ve been working late most nights recently to make up for my morning birding gallivanting.

In fact, I have been birding even harder than usual – if you can believe that!  Spurred on by extraordinary late October finds of an “Audubon’s” Yellow-rumped Warbler at Fort Foster and a Bell’s Vireo (a state bird for me!) on Bailey Island, I found myself somehow even more motivated to beat the bush through the first half of November.  In addition to the 10th Annual South Coastal Maine Rarity Roundup that I organize every year, I worked hard at various traditional hotspots, favorite late fall patches, and various attempts to think “outside the box,” such as walking the 4.5 miles into work today to check a handful of swales and thickets en route (not very productive, except for the exercise, for the record)

While Audubon’s Warbler and Bell’s Vireo are going to be tough to beat – the early-rarity-season bar was set awfully high! – I have had some outstanding birding in November, even if there has yet to be another “Mega.” Personal highlights in the first half of November include a very nice variety of lingering (pioneering?) warblers, a Yellow-breasted Chat, multiple Orange-crowned Warblers (I’ve had four this season to date), huge numbers of Ruddy Ducks on Sabattus Pond, and overall just really good birding with good diversity.

Elsewhere around the state, current highlights include a Northern Hawk-Owl in Lincoln – not a vagrant in the “Rarity Season” sort of way, but exciting nonetheless! And perhaps that, along with an early Snowy Owl report from Biddeford Pool, portends a decent owl irruption this winter? There certainly won’t be any winter finches around this year.). Other birders have detected a variety of late warblers around the state (wow, November Chestnut-sided in Falmouth!), and lots of lingering shorebirds – especially in Scarborough Marsh. But as far as the first half of November usually goes, there have been no truly exceptional birds. Looking around the region, we see goodies such as a Calliope Hummingbird in New Hampshire, A Black-chinned Hummingbird in Connecticut, and the usual fun array of rarities in Massachusetts (Scissor-tailed Flycatcher, Yellow-headed Blackbirds, Western Tanager, American Avocet, etc). However, it is an ultra-spiffy adult Ross’s Gull near Montreal that is the real headliner of the fall in the Northeast so far (and yes, I am being tempted to chase this, I have to admit).

So there are some good birds around the region, and no doubt there are some good birds still to find in Maine. Other than a couple of days, it has been fairly temperate to mild all fall, and I can’t help but wonder if birds that arrived in the state through various vagrancy mechanisms (see Chapter 7 of my book, How to Be a Better Birder) have yet to concentrate along the coast as they seek out more favorable microclimates or seasonal food sources. Also, as the season progresses, more rarities turn up at feeding stations as natural food supplies diminish. December rarities, for example, are often discovered at feeders. Two tardy Chipping Sparrows are at our store’s feeders as I type this, by the way; I’m hoping they pick up a clay-colored cousin. A lot of folks are reporting very busy feeders right now, which is a good sign, especially considering the lack of irruptive finches.

To read the rest of this post, click here.


And to check out the free downloads we’re currently offering, check out the links below:
Crossley ID Guide Raptors : A sampler raptor guide in PDF format including photos and real text from the guide
Quick Finders from The Warbler Guide : A ‘quick finder’ designed to help you identify over 50 warblers faster with targeted color photos


Crossley’s Rough-legged Hawks

Winter is coming. (Game of Thrones anyone?) Richard Crossley is author of The Crossley ID Guide: Raptors and of The Crossley ID Guide: Britain and Ireland, and the supplier of this awesome plate of a rough-legged hawk.While Migration Season is starting to wind down (which is the same direction every leaf in the state appears to have gone), we’re still fascinated by some of these fierce feathered foes.

Check it out!

Rough-legged hawk


And to check out the free downloads we’re currently offering, check out the links below:
Crossley ID Guide Raptors : A sampler raptor guide in PDF format including photos and real text from the guide
Quick Finders from The Warbler Guide : A ‘quick finder’ designed to help you identify over 50 warblers faster with targeted color photos


American Kestrels In Flight

As the leaves continue to change and begin to fall, Richard Crossley, author of The Crossley ID Guide: Raptors, has provided as with a very cool plate of some American Kestrels, both in flight and close up. American Kestrels are aptly named, since they are the only type of kestrel that can be found in the Americas. They are also the smallest falcon to be found in North America. Plus, they’re kind of cute. Check it out!

American kestrel


And to check out the free downloads we’re currently offering, check out the links below:
Crossley ID Guide Raptors : A sampler raptor guide in PDF format including photos and real text from the guide
Quick Finders from The Warbler Guide : A ‘quick finder’ designed to help you identify over 50 warblers faster with targeted color photos


Day 5 of #UPWeek is finally here — the global reach of university presses

upweekToday is the last day of the University Press Week Blog Tour and it’s finally our turn! Today Peter Dougherty considers the importance of finding foreign language publishers to translate and publish UP-generated works. We are joined by a raft of other publishers considering the various ways university presses are expanding the global reach of the scholarship we publish.


Columbia University Press
www.cupblog.org
Georgetown University Press
georgetownuniversitypress.tumblr.com

Discusses how Georgetown University Press gives its readers the tools they need to have a global reach themselves through our foreign language learning materials, our international career guides, and our international affairs titles.

Indiana University Press
iupress.typepad.com
IUP presents an overview of their Mellon-funded Framing the Global project which will develop and disseminate new knowledge, approaches, and methods in the field of global research.
Johns Hopkins University Press
jhupressblog.com

From book translations to international marketing and the growth of Project MUSE into many different nations, the JHU Press can’t help but think beyond the borders of the United States.

New York University Press
fromthesquare.org
Chip Rossetti, managing editor of the Library of Arabic Literature (LAL), will discuss the new LAL series, an ambitious international project which comes out of a partnership between NYU Press and NYU Abu Dhabi.
Princeton University Press
press.princeton.edu/blog
Peter Dougherty, Press Director, writes about the importance of foreign language translations to the future of university press economic health and fulfillment of our missions.
University of Wisconsin Press
uwpress.wordpress.com

Press director Sheila Leary profiles the publishing career of Jan Vansina, one of the founders of the field of African history (rather than colonial history). His innovative seven books with the University of Wisconsin Press from the 1960s to the present have continually broken new ground, influencing the historiography of Africa and several related disciplines.

Yale University Press
blog.yupnet.org

Ivan Lett writes on recent transatlantic collaboration of US-UK marketing initiatives for Yale University Press globally published titles, series, and digital products.

The complete schedule for the blog tour is located here.

Derek Lovitch’s Tenth Annual South Coastal Maine Rarity Roundup

Derek Lovitch, author of How to Be a Better Birder, is still flying high this migration season, spending part of last week along the southern coast of Maine to do some serious birding. In the midst of this ‘rarity season’, Lovitch and his crew recorded some exciting sightings, which he wrote about in this post from his blog, Maine Birding Field Notes.


South Coastal Maine Rarity Roundup TEN!

http://mebirdingfieldnotes.files.wordpress.com/2013/11/blpwsheridanstreetportland11-3-14.jpgEach year on the first weekend of November, a group of us get together to scour the Southern Maine coast for vagrants, lingering migrants, pioneers, irruptive, and other seasonal highlights. Coinciding with the peak of “Rarity Season,” we set out to use the geography of the Maine coast, coupled with knowledge of the best habitats and vagrant traps in order to find as many “good” birds as possible. While this year failed to produce any “Megas,” we once again had a great day in the field, found lots of fun stuff, and enjoyed good food and beer at the Great Lost Bear at the end of the day (the real reason we all get together for this event!)

119 species were tallied by the 8 teams of the TENTH Annual South Coastal Maine Rarity Roundup, six species above our 10-year average, despite somewhat more limited coverage than in the past few years. The continuing “Audubon’s” Yellow-rumped Warbler was added to the cumulative checklist, while we also had our second-ever Snowy Egret, Prairie Warbler, and Nelson’s Sparrow. Blackpoll Warbler and Clay-colored Sparrow appeared for the third time.

Most teams experienced a decidedly “birdy” day, especially from Portland through Scarborough. A fallout of Dark-eyed Juncos, White-throated Sparrows, and Hermit Thrushes occurred with overnight northwesterly winds and a line of pre-dawn showers, with the fallout especially evident on the Portland Peninsula. I’ll have more about the fallout on a blog entry later today.

The fallout that I mentioned above was very evident in the morning, as we birded Portland’s East End. 150+ White-throated Sparrows and 100+ Song Sparrows littered the Eastern Promenade. White-throats were everywhere: 50+ on Sheridan Street for example. And once again there was a decidedly disproportionate number of White-throated Sparrows in gardens and landscaping of downtown Portland. A short loop from One City Center through Monument Square, behind Portland High, and back through Post Office Park yielded 35 White-throats, with the only other native migrant being 7 Hermit Thrushes. Like the sparrow, Hermit Thrushes appear in a wildly disproportionate number to other migrants – especially all other thrushes – in downtown Portland. I’m convinced that something causes White-throated Sparrows and Hermit Thrushes to either a) become disoriented by urban lights more often/more readily, especially under low ceilings (it was cloudy for most of the night and morning) or perhaps b) they simply don’t leave these lots in a morning flight as species such as Dark-eyed Juncos might. In fact, I just read in an article in the Brown Alumni Magazine that a friend of the store dropped off about collisions in New York City that since 1997, more White-throated Sparrows have been found dead than any other species. Coincidence?

Our sum of 26 Hermit Thrushes was truly amazing, as was our overall diversity on the day. While the mild weather certainly has a lot to do with the number of lingering/pioneering birds that we, and other teams, encountered, the late-season fallout earlier in the morning certainly helped our cause.

In other words, it was another great day of birding in urban Portland in the heart of “Rarity Season!”

To see the rest of this post on Lovitch’s blog, click here.


And to check out the free downloads we’re currently offering, check out the links below:
Crossley ID Guide Raptors : A sampler raptor guide in PDF format
Quick Finders from The Warbler Guide : A ‘quick finder’ designed to help you identify over 50 warblers faster with targeted color photos.