Princeton University Press seeks Director of Marketing

Princeton University Press is keen to welcome applicants for a new Director of Marketing, to join and lead a remarkable team of sales, publicity, marketing, and e-publishing staff. PUP is a dynamic, mission based institution committed to bringing the very best trade, academic, and text books to readers and conversations around the world. A recently opened office in Beijing and a remarkable team in Europe offer a unique opportunity to initiate and lead teams and programs at a global scale. The Director of Marketing collaborates directly with the Press Director, and plays a vital role in all strategic initiatives, working with all departments at the Press, from acquisitions to design to production in addition to direct reports.

Responsibilities include:

  • Provide vision, leadership and management of the Press’ global marketing, sales, digital publishing, and publicity departments and establishes strategic direction for these functions. This includes staying abreast of industry trends, crafting and implementing innovative programs and experiments to help insure that the press maintains its leadership position within the university press community.
  • Maintain a leadership role in the development and execution of marketing, sales, and publicity plans in order to meet and exceed the Press’ fiscal year financial targets, cultivate author loyalty, and build upon the press reputation of publishing excellence.
  • Serve as a member of the management team, advising the Director and executive management of the Press on a myriad of strategic issues related to the conduct of our business and mission.
  • Recruit, manage, and develop talented, creative, and qualified personnel (current staff of 33) who understand the mission and objectives of the Press while keeping them motivated and engaged in the conduct of their work. Exercise excellent judgment, foster a culture of creativity and experimentation, and help managers prioritize their work and establish their goals, develop and manage their programs and budgets, continually improve in their professional development, and maintain a collaborative and innovative spirit.
  • Collaborate closely with other departments in helping to set Press priorities and procedures, establishing the seasonal list planning, and takes a critical role in the integration of a new title management and distribution and fulfillment system.
  • In partnership with Press staff in international offices, lead the Press in innovating global initiatives in marketing, sales, and publicity, particularly in Europe and China.
  • Provide vision and leadership role in the Press’ digital publishing sales initiatives and work closely with the senior management of the Press informing them of all major developments and makes strategic recommendations to the Director and senior management team.
  • Work closely with Sales Director and major business partners (including Amazon.com, Two Rivers/Ingram, Baker & Taylor, and Barnes & Noble), in order to maintain strong relationships and negotiate favorable terms.

Qualifications:

  • A minimum of 10 years publishing experience with demonstrated excellence in marketing, publicity, or sales leadership positions.
  • Strength and experience in building and leading teams, and developing staff.
  • Strategic thinker with experience creating and implementing strategic change.
  • Extensive experience in trade and scholarly publishing, sales, and publicity – domestically and internationally preferred. Experience in digital publishing and textbook publishing preferred. Experience in social media and digital marketing preferred.
  • Ability to communicate effectively in all types of business situations and cultures – internal and external. Experience leading committees and chairing meetings.
  • Understands and fully supports the fundamental mission statement of the Press.

Interested candidates should send a cover letter with salary requirements and resumé to: resumes@press.princeton.edu.

Note that applications will only be accepted from Tuesday, September 19th to Friday, October 6th.

Only finalists will be contacted. For more information on Princeton University Press, visit http://press.princeton.edu/.

EOE/AA/M/F/D/V

Princeton University Press is an equal opportunity employer. All applicants will be considered for employment without attention to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, veteran or disability status.

Welcome to our new director, Christie Henry

Just before Labor Day, we warmly welcomed Christie Henry, formerly of University of Chicago Press, as she began her tenure as the new director of Princeton University Press. Her distinguished list at Chicago and extensive knowledge of the landscape of university press publishing are incredible assets as she leads the PUP team into the next era. We’re thrilled to have her on board.

Recently The Chronicle of Higher Education’s Rachel Toor interviewed Christie as part of their Scholars Talk Writing series. In it she discusses the relationships that drive success in the world of books, the job of an editorial director, the financial landscape of academic publishing, how to bring scholarship to a general audience, publishing challenges, and more:

That Christie Henry has left the University of Chicago Press after 24 years to take over as director of Princeton University Press is a boon for her and her new colleagues. For the staff at Chicago — and its authors, including me — well, it’s been bittersweet.

As editorial director for the sciences, social sciences, and reference at Chicago, Christie was involved with my book project from its inception, providing enthusiastic support and smart suggestions. My editor, Mary Laur, credits her former boss with teaching her how not to be a “crappy editor.” (Mary is, in fact, anything but.) At Chicago, Christie published a distinguished list that included The Deep: The Extraordinary Creatures of the Abyss, The Oldest Living Things In the World, How Animals Grieve, and Relentless Evolution.

When I got the advance copy of my new book, it came gift-wrapped in University of Chicago Press paper. Then Mary emailed asking me for the name of an administrator at my university so she could send a copy of my book announcing its publication. Mary credits Christie Henry with those nice touches. That made Christie a good candidate for the Scholars Talk Writing series, for both personal and professional reasons.

Let’s talk about some of these publishing lagniappes.

Henry: Truly, I can take no credit for the gift wrap. I think it came with the founding of the press in 1891! The experience of wrapping a book to me is a moment of reflection — a poignant reminder that we occasionally do need to pause, to celebrate what we have accomplished, and to then regift. The return of a published book to an author is a gift of collaboration. That final published form needs to be celebrated by all of those who touched its pages, its endpapers, and I think the wrapping paper symbolizes that celebration.

And for the additional copies we gift, this ensures that the celebration is not too localized. It takes more than a proverbial village to make books, including the support of administrators and peers. We all know of the disruption books can cause in an author’s life. In the sciences, I found that, because journal articles are the tools of professional evolution and credentialing, department chairs and deans were often unaware of book-length authorial endeavors. I felt it necessary to share the successes on behalf of the authors, and ensure their administrators were aware of their accomplishments.

Read the full piece at The Chronicle of Higher Education here. You can find another great interview with Christie in Dartmouth Alumni Magazine.

Princeton University Press opens office in China

为了在世界范围内更深入地推动大学出版社的学术使命并开展多样的业务活动,普林斯顿大学出版社于2017年2月成功在中国建立了法律实体,这使得普林斯顿大学出版社在成为一个全球化出版社的道路上迈入了更新的阶段。2017年8月,普林斯顿大学出版社位于北京的中国办公室正式揭幕,期望未来能在东西方学术及文化交流中起到重要作用。

As a crucial milestone in the effort to build a thriving global university press, Princeton University Press successfully established a legal entity in China on Feb. 14, 2017, which enables PUP to further advance its scholarly mission and business ambition on a global stage. PUP announced the opening of its China Office in August 2017. PUP wishes to play a more important role in fostering cross-cultural academic conversations.

Princeton University Press is very proud to announce the opening of its China office in Beijing on August 15, 2017, the first such presence for a U.S. university press. Following the successful establishment of its first international office, in Europe in 1999, PUP has chosen to expand in China because of the country’s growing investment in higher education and scholarly research and its increasing centrality in the world of ideas and the world itself. The Press regards its opening in China as a step toward greater engagement with outstanding scholars in China and throughout Asia, both as readers and as prospective authors.

Princeton’s China office is led by Lingxi Li, a graduate of Beijing Normal and Columbia universities. In the past few months, we are very proud to have hired an additional three office staff members to drive and support our efforts in China: Chu Wu, who transferred from Princeton to the China office to begin a new role as the Operations and Marketing Associate; Tiantian Li, who joined the China office as Business Analyst; and Jingwen Sun, who is our Consultative Sales Associate.

During this year’s Beijing Book Fair (August 23-27, 2017) Princeton University Press sent a team of six: Scot Kuehm (CFO), Al Bertrand (Editor-in-Chief and Associate Publishing Director), Brigitta van Rheinberg (Director of Global Development and History Publisher), Kim Williams (International Rights Director, from the UK office), Alison Kalett (Executive Editor, Biology and Neuroscience), and Vickie Kearn (Executive Editor, Mathematics and Computer Science). The team had many successful meetings before and during the Fair: visits, facilitated by PUP’s Chinese subagent David Tsai, from the Bardon Chinese Media Agency, to several publishers (such as Ginkgo, Citic, China Machine Press), as well as meetings during the Fair with many other of the Press’s prominent Chinese publishing partners. PUP now typically concludes more than 100 Chinese-language licenses annually in China, the biggest translation market for PUP.

The team also concluded successful meetings with a host of important distributors such as CEPIEC and CNPIEC, the latter one of the leading distributors in China, as well as Amazon China, Shanghai Book Trader, and the DeGruyter team, among many others.

Princeton’s team was also involved in two major speaking events during the Book Fair: One was called “Princeton University Press: The Growth of Translation Licensing in China and Opportunities to Collaborate in the Future,” a presentation by Kim Williams detailing PUP’s rights activities and laying out future collaboration with Chinese publishing colleagues. The second presentation was a keynote speech given by Al Bertrand during the Fair’s Academic Publishing forum, with the title “Maintaining Academic Excellence, Reaching a Global Audience.” In his presentation, Bertrand described the Press’s efforts in the global arena and gave an overview of how the Press maintains its standard of excellence. The overall theme for this year’s publishing forum was “University Presses in a Global Context: Disseminating Knowledge Worldwide.” Other speakers were Wu Shulin, Vice President of the Publishers Association of China; Ju Dongming, Director of Zheijang University Press; and Peter Schoppert, Director of the National University of Singapore Press. Brigitta van Rheinberg moderated the event.

On the Sunday after the Fair, Princeton’s team hosted its second annual meeting with its China Academic Advisory Board, which consists of eleven leading Chinese scholars, who will be working with PUP on deepening our institutional relationships in the Chinese academy as well as identifying individual scholarly projects that will contribute to our effort to make Princeton’s author pool more global, especially regarding China.

Youngsuk Chi, Chairman of Elsevier and a member of the PUP Board of Trustees, gave the opening remarks, which was followed by presentations by board members, who gave overviews of their fields and spoke about how PUP can engage with scholars in these disciplines.

We couldn’t be more grateful to everyone we met and talked with at the Beijing Book Fair and throughout our exciting and successful trip to China. With our new China office, with our new PUP colleagues in China, with the renewal of our conversations with our China Academic Advisory Board, and with a host of related activities, our connections with the Chinese publishing and academic communities are growing stronger every day.

 

Introducing our Fall 2017 Preview video

We’ve got a lot of new and exciting titles slated for release in Fall 2017. Take a look:

Christie Henry to become director of Princeton University Press

Christie Henry, editorial director for sciences, social sciences and reference at the University of Chicago Press, will become director of the Princeton University Press effective Sept. 1.

Henry will succeed Peter Dougherty, who has been director of the Princeton University Press since 2005 and will retire as of the end of this year.

“Princeton University Press has been astonishingly fortunate in its directors, from its first, Whitney Darrow, to its most recent, Peter Dougherty,” said W. Drake McFeely, chairman of the Press’ board of trustees and president and chairman of W.W. Norton & Co.

“Christie Henry was selected from a formidably strong group of candidates and we have every expectation that she will continue the tradition of bold, creative and intelligent leadership from which the Press has benefited for more than a hundred years.”

Jill Dolan, Princeton’s dean of the college, a member of the Press’ board and chair of the search committee, said she was “delighted by Christie Henry’s historic appointment as the first woman to direct PUP. Her superb editorial skills, combined with her savvy sense of the industry and her keen commitment to team-building and collaboration make her the perfect choice to lead the Press into its next era.

“Christie will build on the Peter Dougherty’s legacy and inspire the Press staff and its authors toward innovation and new heights of excellence,” Dolan said. “I so look forward to seeing how Christie will shape the Press’ contribution to knowledge.”

Henry joined the University of Chicago Press as an editorial assistant in 1993 and has risen through the ranks as an editorial associate, assistant editor, editor, senior editor and executive editor. In 2008 she was appointed to her current role as editorial director, in which she manages the acquisitions programs and staff for life science and science studies; economics, political science and law; and reference, which includes the print and digital versions of The Chicago Manual of Style.

She represents the Press at publishing and science meetings and conventions across the world, including the Frankfurt Book Fair, London Book Fair, Book Expo America, Association of American University Presses and the National Association of Science Writers.

“Princeton University Press has been an inspiration to me for the entirety of my publishing career and my life as a reader,” Henry said. “Bound into its imprint is a known excellence that sets standards in all niches of the publishing ecosystem, and which is owed to a staff and to authors of incredible creativity and talent. Its global reach and editorial vibrancy, animated by Peter Dougherty’s leadership and the collaboration with the University and the Press Board, have flourished these last 12 years.”

Prior to the Press, Henry was an editorial assistant from 1991 to 1993 at the Chicago Tribune. She is a graduate of Dartmouth College and has a certificate in leadership strategies for book publishing from the Yale Publishing Program.

A leading publisher of scholarly books since 1905, Princeton University Press publishes about 230 titles a year in the humanities, social sciences and physical sciences. It is headquartered in Princeton with offices in Oxford, England.

The Press is an independent publisher with close formal and informal connections to Princeton University. The Board of Trustees consists of seventeen members, eleven of which must have a Princeton University connection, among them a five member editorial board which makes the final decisions about which books will bear the Press’ imprint.

“The privilege of leading the PUP team in its ongoing evolution and successful adaptation to our dynamic publishing environment is profoundly exciting to me, and I eagerly await the opportunities as well as life within the Princeton community,” Henry said.

Photo credit: Laura S. Coe

Christie Henry to be next director of Princeton University Press

We are delighted to announce the appointment of Christie Henry as the next director of Princeton University Press, effective early this September.  Ms. Henry, an alumna of Dartmouth College, is Editorial Director for the Sciences, Social Sciences, and Reference at the University of Chicago Press, where she has worked since 1993 mainly acquiring books in the life sciences.  On behalf of her new colleagues at PUP, we extend the warmest congratulations and best wishes to Christie and her family as we look forward to welcoming them to Princeton.     

R.I.P. to the courtyard tree

Life and prosperity, wisdom and stability—for all that trees have symbolized throughout the ages, it seems fitting that an institution as old and august as Princeton University Press would have its own. That tree has long been the unusually attractive one gracing the center of our distinctive, circular courtyard entryway on William street. Flanked by periwinkle and rosebushes, some thought it was cherry, others were sure it was a Siberian crab apple. Either way, it saw countless outdoor celebrations, greeting staff and visitors alike with its shower of petals that, though sparser with each passing spring, were never less welcoming. Though no one at the Press could recall when exactly the tree had been planted, we were sad to learn that in spite of heroic efforts to stave off our graceful friend’s fragile health, the case had been deemed too dire. On a sunny Friday morning, we arrived at work to the sound of chainsaws. Within the space of an hour, the tree was gone, mementos placed in the kitchen for long-time staff. They were claimed in minutes.

courtyard tree removed

A replacement will be planted in due time—this time Carpinus caroliniana—a beautiful variety with fluted, blue-gray bark, no petals, but leaves that offer, according to various arboretums, “a kaleidoscope of color throughout the year.” New things will grow.

But old things will be remembered for how lovely they were. Goodbye, old friend.

 

PUP champions scientific research with March for Science

Princeton University Press’s mission is to bring scholarly ideas to the world. We publish books that connect authors and readers across spheres of knowledge to advance and enrich the human conversation. We embrace the highest standards in our publishing as embodied in the work of our authors from Albert Einstein in our earliest years to the present.

In keeping with our commitment to serve the nation and the world with top-notch science publishing, we’re excited to announce that we will be partnering with The March for Science on April 22 in Washington, DC. PUP’s Physical and Computer Science editor, Eric Henney, will participate in a morning Teach-in on the National Mall, focusing on the social value of direct and engaging scientific communication with the public. Stay tuned for details.

From the March for Science mission statement:

The March for Science champions robustly funded and publicly communicated science as a pillar of human freedom and prosperity. We unite as a diverse, nonpartisan group to call for science that upholds the common good and for political leaders and policy makers to enact evidence based policies in the public interest.

The March for Science is a celebration of science.  It’s not only about scientists and politicians; it is about the very real role that science plays in each of our lives and the need to respect and encourage research that gives us insight into the world.


Read the full statement here.

In our politicized world, the application of science to policy is not a partisan issue. Like the March for Science, Princeton University Press is proud to support engagement with scientific research through education, communication, and ties of mutual respect between scientists and their communities. Hope you’ll join us on Earth Day in DC.

Our big holiday web sale is in full swing!

Stumped for a last minute gift? There’s still time to save 40% on select print books through our big holiday web sale. The sale ends January 6th, so hurry over to our website and use code HOLLY40 to save!

holiday sale

Dougherty Plans to Retire Next Year as Director of Princeton University Press

Peter DoughertyPeter J. Dougherty, who has directed Princeton University Press since 2005 and has led the Press in publishing some of the most celebrated scholarly titles of the past decade, including books by a dozen Nobel Prize winners, will retire as director at the end of December 2017.

The announcement was made by W. Drake McFeely, chairman of the Press’s board of trustees and president and chairman of W. W. Norton, at the Press’s annual Association dinner following the December 8 board meeting.

According to McFeely, “Peter Dougherty had a visionary plan for Princeton University Press when he took the reins as director eleven years ago. He has executed and expanded brilliantly on that plan, furthering the scholarly publishing mission of the Press while broadening its reach internationally. He has transformed its editorial, management, and operational structure, and has still found time to contribute his insights to the larger scholarly publishing community and to continue his own editorial pursuits. The Press has been fortunate in its directors, and Peter ranks with the best of them.”

Princeton University president Christopher L. Eisgruber, who chairs the Press board’s executive committee, said, “Peter Dougherty has led the Princeton University Press with spectacular distinction for more than a decade. During his tenure, the Press has consistently published outstanding books that have defined scholarly debates and appealed to a broad range of readers. He has spoken out effectively on issues important to scholarly publishing, and he has built a superb editorial and operational team that will ensure the continued excellence of the Press in years to come.”

The Press will conduct an international search to identify a successor to Dougherty. Jill Dolan, dean of the college at Princeton University and a trustee of the Press, will chair the search committee.

“It is an honor to have worked with the authors, trustees, and staff of Princeton University Press to enhance our list,” said Dougherty, “while also building our international presence by expanding our operation in Europe, opening our new office in China, and moving the Press fully into the digital—and, therefore, global—realm.”

Princeton University Press, a leading publisher of scholarly books since 1905, publishes about 230 titles per year in the humanities, social sciences, and physical sciences. It is headquartered in Princeton, with offices in England and in China. In recent years, the Press has produced record performances in awards won, translations licensed, and sales.

“My colleagues and I at the Press are especially gratified that many of the widely admired books we’ve published in the past decade have been by Princeton faculty,” Dougherty said.

Several of these Princeton-based books include Peter Brown’s Through the Eye of a Needle: Wealth, the Fall of Rome, and the Making of Christianity in the West, 350–550 AD; Jeremy Adelman’s Worldly Philosopher: The Odyssey of Albert O. Hirschman; Angus Deaton’s The Great Escape: Health, Wealth, and the Origins of Inequality; Harriet Flower’s Roman Republics; Hal Foster’s The First Pop Age: Painting and Subjectivity in the Art of Hamilton, Lichtenstein, Warhol, Richter, and Ruscha; Nancy Weiss Malkiel’s “Keep the Damned Women Out”: The Struggle for Coeducation; Steven Gubser’s The Little Book of String Theory; and Alan Krueger’s What Makes a Terrorist: Economics and the Roots of Terrorism.

Peter Dougherty came to Princeton from the Free Press in New York in 1992 as PUP’s economics editor and was named director in 2005. He has served as president of the Association of American University Presses and on the board of the American Association of Publishers. He teaches in the University of Denver’s Publishing Institute and sits on the advisory council of Rutgers University Press and the editorial board of the Princeton University Library Chronicle. He is the recipient of the 2015 Brother D. Aloysius Lumley Alumni Award of the West Philadelphia Catholic High School for Boys.

During Dougherty’s years as director, Princeton University Press has recorded numerous achievements, including:

—Publication of an impressive array of highly acclaimed titles, including multiple winners of the R. R. Hawkins Prize of the American Association of Publishers, the Paul Samuelson Prize of TIAA-CREF, and the Christian Gauss Award of Phi Beta Kappa; two National Book Award finalists; four New York Times bestsellers; and a cluster of outstanding economics titles, including works by Nobel laureates George A. Akerlof and Robert J. Shiller, that came to define the financial crisis of 2007–8.

—Revival of the Princeton Series of Contemporary Poets, initially under the editorship of Professor Paul Muldoon and currently under Professor Susan Stewart, as well as the Press’s lists in art history and the history of science; expansion of its classics and sociology lists; and launch of new lists in computer science and psychology/neuroscience.

—Online publication of The Collected Papers of Albert Einstein through Volume 14 (1923–1925), freely available; of The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, now available freely on the National Archives website; and of The Complete Digital Edition of the Collected Works of C. G. Jung.

—Digitization of the Press’s entire list of publications, including its historical backlist made newly available in the Princeton Legacy Library; repackaging of the paperback Princeton Science Library; launch of the new paperback series Princeton Classics; and digital publication of Princeton titles in the major online library aggregations.

—Expansion of Princeton’s European staff from three to eleven colleagues; establishment of the PUP European Advisory Board and launch of the annual Princeton-in-Europe lecture; and opening of the Princeton University Press office in China and inauguration of the PUP Chinese Academic Advisory Board.

—Migration of the Press’s fulfillment service from its former warehouse, co-owned with the University of California Press, in Ewing, New Jersey, to the Perseus Distribution division of Ingram Publisher Services; establishment of the new domestic sales consortium with the MIT Press and Yale University Press; creation of the Press’s Senior Management Group; and redesign of the Press’s graphic identity and logo.

In retirement, Dougherty plans to remain in Princeton, where he lives with his wife, former book editor Elizabeth Hock.

Frankfurt Book Fair by the Numbers

As a global publisher actively expanding our international community, Princeton University Press was proud to send an entourage of 12 staff from the editorial, marketing, sales, and publicity teams to this year’s Frankfurt Book Fair last month. A veritable grand dame of book fairs, Frankfurt lasts over a period of 5 days and this year received 227,000 visitors from the public and trade alike.

Frankfurt Book Fair

Jenny Redhead, Kim Williams, and Caroline Priday from PUP’s European office

Three plucky, courageous, some might say superhuman (I’ll stop there) colleagues from the International Rights team made the annual pilgrimage to the Buchmesse to share our latest and forthcoming titles with publishers and agents from around the world. The team presented forthcoming books from our Spring 2017 list in our beautifully designed rights guide by Heather Hansen from PUP’s design team.

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We exhausted our ability to speak while talking about our fabulous forthcoming books, so here is a Frankfurt by numbers for those of you who haven’t experienced the magic for yourselves:

  • 4 days of meetings
  • 90 appointments
  • 150 business cards
  • Publishers from 22 countries
  • 14: the highest number of people who turned up for one 30-minute meeting
  • 150 freshly printed rights guides
  • 30 new titles
  • 86 PUP books discussed
  • Umpteen coffees
  • 712: the number of pages in the longest book in the rights guide
  • 4: the number of cocktail parties we missed because we were in back to back appointments
  • 6: the number of copies of Welcome to the Universe that were stolen from the stand on the first day
  • Ten compliments on our fabulous cover designs
  • Three: the number of cheek kisses one is expected to offer to publishers in Europe, except in the UK where a firm handshake is quite friendly enough, thank you
  • One: the number of PUP rights professionals who got lost in the agent’s centre on the way to a meeting
  • 0: the number of times part of the stand fell on someone’s head (take that, Frankfurt 2014)
  • And 1 GLORIOUS lunch hour

What are your favourite book fair moments? We’d love to hear from you!

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–Kimberly Williams, International Rights Director

Princeton University Press to Name Its Higher Education List in Honor of William G. Bowen

William G. Bowen, President Emeritus, The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

Photo credit: David Lubarsky

Princeton University Press has lost one of its greatest authors and closest friends and supporters. William G. Bowen, former president of Princeton University and of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, died last Thursday night at age eighty-three. While President Bowen will be best remembered, and appropriately so, as a university leader, he raised the study of higher education and its institutions to a new level as an author, coauthor, and editor of books. In addition to the many Princeton University Press titles that bear his name, Bill recruited a score of authors to PUP and, through the impact of our list on the scholarship of higher education, attracted even more. To mark this singular contribution to our publishing endeavor, the Press has chosen to make the unprecedented gesture of naming our higher education list in his honor: henceforth, The William G. Bowen Memorial Series in Higher Education.

William Bowen began his decades-long association with Princeton University Press as an author in 1969 with the publication of his monograph (with T. Aldrich Finegan), The Economics of Labor Force Participation. Then, beginning in 1972, as president of Princeton, he served on the Press’s board of trustees. He resumed his role as a PUP author in 1988—the final year of his presidency—with the publication of Ever the Teacher, a collection of his official writings and remarks. Yet it was as president of the Mellon Foundation, rather than of the University, that Bill made his most lasting, significant mark on the Press, beginning with the 1989 publication (with Julie Ann Sosa) of Prospects for Faculty in the Arts and Sciences. Though, nearly thirty years on, he is more closely identified with other, later works, it was this book that initiated the parade of publications that defines not only our publishing in the field of higher education, but, indeed, the scholarly arc of analysis of higher education in America and in the world.

Bill’s engagement with PUP expressed itself in two ways. He was, first and foremost, author, coauthor, or coeditor of twelve books on higher education under the Princeton University Press imprint, the subject matter of which spanned the gamut of issues from admissions to diversity, sports, the market for scholars, digital technology, cost containment, degree completion, governance, leadership, and more.

Bowen_Shape of RiverHis greatest achievement as an author, indisputably, was his 1998 collaboration with Derek Bok, The Shape of the River: Long-Term Consequences of Considering Race in College and University Admissions, which—in a research study unprecedented in scale and comprehensiveness—made the evidence-based case for affirmative action and influenced higher education policy nationwide. Beyond the extensive acclaim it gathered across the political spectrum, and the awards it garnered, The Shape of the River enjoyed the rare distinction of being cited by Justice Sandra Day O’Connor in the 2003 US Supreme Court case upholding affirmative action, Grutter v. Bollinger.

In addition to his prodigious work as an author, Bill was an informal PUP advisory editor, attracting to the Princeton list authors from his network of fellow researchers, thereby bringing a chorus of informed voices to the higher education conversation under the PUP imprint. Largely through Bill’s tireless work and enthusiastic editorial recruitment efforts, PUP can now boast as authors such distinguished scholars and higher education leaders as Harold T. Shapiro, Bill’s successor in the Princeton presidency; Derek Bok and Neil L. Rudenstine, presidents emeritus of Harvard University; Michael S. McPherson, president of the Spencer Foundation and former president of Macalester College; Morton Schapiro, president of Northwestern University; and Nancy Weiss Malkiel, Princeton’s former dean of the college—to name just a few.

Seen from a wider perspective, Bill was in effect the architect of a scholarly agenda that, translated into a publishing program, has raised and addressed many of the most relevant, urgent questions besetting higher education. The books he brought to the Princeton list constitute a whole far greater than the sum of its parts: emanating from Bill’s own field of economics outward through the work of historians, legal scholars, scholars of religion, sociologists, and others, the list both encompasses and defines the intellectual terrain of modern higher education while framing the big issues for future scholars to explore.

Lesson PlanBill Bowen’s last book, published by us earlier this year, eloquently embodies his PUP publishing legacy. Cowritten with his close colleague and frequent collaborator Michael McPherson, Lesson Plan: An Agenda for Change in American Higher Education offers a blueprint for addressing the central issues now facing colleges and universities, and touches upon all the relevant areas on which Bill and his co-researchers have shed light: educational attainment, completion rates, socioeconomic and racial disparities, affordability, student aid, efficiency, sports, teaching, technology, and leadership. In outlining their “agenda for change,” Bowen and McPherson display a characteristic purposefulness mixed with optimism:

There is much that can be accomplished. Alexis de Tocqueville, in his famous Democracy in America (1835), observed: “The greatness of America lies not in being more enlightened than any other nation, but rather in her ability to repair her faults.” However true this may have been in the early part of the nineteenth century, we fervently hope that it is true today.

William G. Bowen—author, editor, collaborator, adviser, supporter of the Press, and true friend—brought this combination of purpose and optimism to the Press as he worked with us to publish books, define our ongoing editorial agenda, and repair not a few of our faults as we strove to be better. In formally dedicating our higher education list in his name, his grateful associates at Princeton University Press hereby make a partial payment on the Bowen legacy, which will live on in the books he has inspired.

Peter J. Dougherty, Director
October 24, 2016