Win a copy of The Original Folk & Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm

In anticipation of Cinderella‘s movie release on March 13, we are giving away a copy of The Original Folk & Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm. The total value of this prize is $35.00.

How to win? There are three ways to enter: visit The Original Folk & Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm’s Facebook page; email us at blog@press.princeton.edu; or follow @PrincetonUPress on Twitter. Just follow the steps in the Rafflecopter box below. The winner will be selected on March 5, 2015.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

 


 

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The Original Folk and Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm:
The Complete First Edition
Jacob & Wilhelm Grimm, Translated and edited by Jack Zipes
Illustrated by Andrea Dezsö

#NewBooks released February 9, 2015

bookjacket Eating People Is Wrong, and Other Essays on Famine, Its Past, and Its Future
Cormac Ó Gráda“Cormac Ó Gráda has written a beautiful book about a painful and difficult subject, famines. In these five essays, he shows how combining the skills and common sense of the economist with the subtlety and sensitivity of the historian can produce fascinating and deep insights into a topic that few people today think about but that historians and observers of the developing world cannot ignore.” –Joel Mokyr, Northwestern University

 

 

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Making War at Fort Hood:
Life and Uncertainty in a Military Community

Kenneth T. MacLeish

“MacLeish writes eloquently….[T]his portrait of Army life on American turf is a welcome change of pace from the recent surge of battle-focused narratives.” –Publishers Weekly

 

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The Medea Hypothesis:
Is Life on Earth Ultimately Self-Destructive?

Peter Ward

“Ward holds the Gaia Hypothesis, and the thinking behind it, responsible for encouraging a set of fairy-tale assumptions about the eart, and he’d like his new book, due out this spring, to help uncture them. He hopes not only to shake the philosophical underpinnings of environmentalism, but to reshape our understanding of our relationship with nature, and of life’s ultimate sustainability on this planet and beyond.” –Drake Bennett, Boston Globe

 

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No Joke:
Making Jewish Humo
r
Ruth R. Wisse

“[S]ubtle and provocative…” –Anthony Gottlieb, New York Times Book Review

 

bookjacket One Day in the Life of the English Language:
A Microcosmic Usage Handbook

Frank L. Cioffi

One Day in the Life of the English Language is a welcome departure from the vast majority of grammar handbooks. Cioffi suggests that instead of memorizing tons of rules about sentence structure, students should internalize how sentences work–and with the motivation he gives, students have the incentive to want to write well. I truly love this book.” –Elizabethada A. Wright, University of Minnesota

 

bookjacket Partial Differential Equations:
An Introduction to Theory and Applications

Michael Shearer & Rachel Levy

“The writing style of this book is accessible, clear, and student friendly. It is approachable, with plenty of motivation for new students, and integrates nonlinear PDEs throughout. Shearer and Levy are familiar with contemporary research in applied PDEs and have made an excellent section of topics to introduce the field.” –John K. Hunter, University of California, Davis

 

bookjacket A Pocket Guide to Sharks of the World
David A. Ebert, Sarah Fowler & Marc Dando

 

 

“Best of 2014″ Booklists

2014 was a great year at Princeton University Press; we have had an overwhelming number of books featured on booklists. Through the efforts of the publicity and marketing & sales departments, the Press has complied “Best of 2014” Booklists.

2015 PROSE Awards

The Professional and Scholarly Publishing (PSP) Division of the Association of American Publishers (AAP) announced the (39th annual) 2015 PROSE Award Winners on February 5th at the PSP Annual Conference in Washington, D.C. According to the PROSE press release, the 2015 PROSE Awards received a record-breaking 540 entries of books, reference works, journals, and electronic products in more than 50 categories.

Princeton University Press won top awards in 7 Book Subject Categories, and received 13 Honorable Mention awards – a total of 20 awards. This is a record for PUP, as we won more PROSE awards than any other publisher this year. For the full list of 2015 PROSE Award winners click, here. The official press release can be found, here.

7 Category Award Winners
Timothy Verstynen and Bradley Voytek - Do Zombies Dream of Undead Sheep? A Neuroscientific View of the Zombie Brain
Winner of the 2015 PROSE Award in Biomedicine & Neuroscience, Association of American Publishers

Charles W. Calomiris and Stephen H. Haber – Fragile by Design: The Political Origins of Banking Crises and Scarce Credit
Winner of the 2015 PROSE Award in Business, Finance & Management, Association of American Publishers

Jonathan Israel – Revolutionary Ideas: An Intellectual History of the French Revolution from The Rights of Man to Robespierre
Winner of the 2015 PROSE Award in European & World History, Association of American Publishers

Tim Birkhead, Jo Wimpenny and Bob Montgomerie – Ten Thousand Birds: Ornithology since Darwin
Winner of the 2015 PROSE Award in History of Science, Medicine & Technology, Association of American Publishers

Gil Nelson, Christopher J. Earle and Richard Spellenberg – Trees of Eastern North America
Winner of the 2015 PROSE Award in Outstanding Work by a Trade Publisher, Association of American Publishers

Thomas W. Cronin, Sonke Johnsen, N. Justin Marshall and Eric J. Warrant – Visual Ecology
Winner of the 2015 PROSE Award in Textbook/Biological & Life Sciences, Association of American Publishers

Mukesh Eswaran – Why Gender Matters in Economics
Winner of the 2015 PROSE Award in Textbook/Social Sciences, Association of American Publishers

 

13 Honorable Mention Winners

Eric H. Cline - 1177 B.C.: The Year Civilization Collapsed
Honorable Mention for the 2015 PROSE Award in Archeology & Anthropology, Association of American Publishers

Peter R. Grant and B. Rosemary Grant- 40 Years of Evolution: Darwin’s Finches on Daphne Major Island
Honorable Mention for the 2015 PROSE Award in Biological Sciences, Association of American Publishers

Eswar S. Prasad – The Dollar Trap: How the U.S. Dollar Tightened Its Grip on Global Finance
Honorable Mention for the 2015 PROSE Award in Business, Finance & Management, Association of American Publishers

Gregory Clark – The Son Also Rises: Surnames and the History of Social Mobility
Honorable Mention for the 2015 PROSE Award in Economics, Association of American Publishers

Anders Winroth, The Age of the Vikings
Honorable Mention for the 2015 PROSE Award in European & World History, Association of American Publishers

Yohanan Petrovsky-Shtern, The Golden Age Shtetl: A New History of Jewish Life in East Europe
Honorable Mention for the 2015 PROSE Award in European & World History, Association of American Publishers

Edmund Fawcett – Liberalism: The Life of an Idea
Honorable Mention for the 2015 PROSE Award in Government & Politics, Association of American Publishers

Peter H. Schuck – Why Government Fails So Often: And How It Can Do Better
Honorable Mention for the 2015 PROSE Award in Government & Politics, Association of American Publishers

James Turner – Philology: The Forgotten Origins of the Modern Humanities
Honorable Mention for the 2015 PROSE Award in Language & Linguistics, Association of American Publishers

Peter Baldwin - The Copyright Wars: Three Centuries of Trans-Atlantic Battle
Honorable Mention for the 2015 PROSE Award in Law & Legal Studies, Association of American Publishers

David Edmonds – Would You Kill the Fat Man? The Trolley Problem and What Your Answer Tells Us about Right and Wrong
Honorable Mention for the 2015 PROSE Award in Philosophy, Association of American Publishers

Eli Maor and Eugen Jost – Beautiful Geometry
Honorable Mention for the 2015 PROSE Award in Popular Science & Popular Mathematics, Association of American Publishers

Moshe Halbertal – Maimonides: Life and Thought
Honorable Mention for the 2015 PROSE Award in Theology & Religious Studies, Association of American Publishers

 

Congratulations to the winners of the 2015 PROSE Awards!

Princeton University Press’s extended best-seller list for the holidays

What are people picking up for the holidays? Our best-seller list provides lots of clues — biography, literature, history, and birds!

Alan Turing: The Enigma, The Book That Inspired the Film The Imitation Game by Andrew Hodges
The Original Folk and Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm edited by Jack Zipes
1177 BC: The Year Civilization Collapsed by Eric H. Cline
Tesla: Inventor of the Electrical Age by W. Bernard Carlson
Lost Animals: Extinction and the Photographic Record by Errol Fuller
The Age of the Vikings Anders Winroth
The Future of the Brain: Essays by the World’s Leading Neuroscientists edited by Gary Marcus & Jeremy Freeman
On Bullshit by Harry Frankfurt
The Mystery of the Invisible Hand: A Henry Spearman Mystery by Marshall Jevons
Mastering ’Metrics: The Path from Cause to Effect by Joshua D. Angrist & Jörn-Steffen Pischke
The New York Nobody Knows: Walking 6,000 Miles in the City by William B. Helmreich
The Amazons: Lives and Legends of Warrior Women across the Ancient World by Adrienne Mayor
QED: The Strange Theory of Light and Matter Richard P. Feynman
Penguins: The Ultimate Guide by Tui De Roy, Mark Jones & Julie Cornthwaite
The Warbler Guide by Tom Stephenson and Scott Whittle

University Press Week is next week! #UPWeek

Monday is the start of University Press Week! Join us as we highlight the extraordinary work of nonprofit scholarly publishers and their many contributions to culture, the academy, and an informed society.

What is #UPWeek you ask?

In the summer of 1978, President Jimmy Carter proclaimed a University Press Week “in recognition of the impact, both here and abroad, of American university presses on culture and scholarship.” That influence continues today, as does the increasing vitality of university press publishing programs, the many ways and means by which works are now produced and distributed, and the urgent need for articulate discourse in times pervaded by sound bites. Pretty cool, huh?

This year, we have a lot to celebrate.

All week long, 31 different university presses will be bringing you the latest and greatest news, including what’s trending in their offices, on their shelves, and in their plans for the future. Every day, tune in here for a new roundup of posts from university presses. We’ll visit MIT on out to the University of Washington, with many stops in between. This year’s topics include:

upress week topics

We begin the week with a look at what’s new in press collaboration, and then we’ll give you an inside look at our presses. Can you spot university presses in pop culture? Just you wait — on Wednesday, we’ll provide the latest scoop. Then on Thursday, we take a look back at some terrific projects that have put university presses on the map. On Friday, we’ll recommend some topics and authors for you to follow — in addition to a discussion of social media.

Gearing Up

So what can you do to prep for a week of enlightening posts and great conversations? Check out this map of university presses to find which is closest to you. When it comes to university presses, you’re among friends — lots of them. The AAUP has over 130 members, all sharing a common commitment to scholarship, the academy, and society.

See you back here on Monday!

Upress week

common commitments to scholarship, the academy, and society – See more at: http://www.aaupnet.org/#sthash.ZdvOvvjy.dpuf
common commitments to scholarship, the academy, and society – See more at: http://www.aaupnet.org/#sthash.ZdvOvvjy.dpuf
common commitments to scholarship, the academy, and society – See more at: http://www.aaupnet.org/#sthash.ZdvOvvjy.dpuf

Princeton University Press’s best-selling books for the week

These are the best-selling books for the past week.

1177 BC: The Year Civilization Collapsed by Eric H. Cline
The Bankers’ New Clothes: What’s Wrong with Banking and What to Do about It by Anat Admati & Martin Hellwig
The Founder’s Dilemmas: Anticipating and Avoiding the Pitfalls That Can Sink a Startup by Noam Wasserman
Why Not Socialism? by G. A. Cohen
OnBullshit On Bullshit by Harry G. Frankfurt
The Calculus Lifesaver: All the Tools You Need to Excel at Calculus by Adrian Banner
Tesla: Inventor of the Electrical Age by W. Bernard Carlson
The 5 Elements of Effective Thinking by Edward B. Burger & Michael Starbird
The Bee: A Natural History Noah Wilson-Rich
The Age of the Vikings Anders Winroth

Take It to Go: Princeton University Press Collaborates with Scribd and Oyster


7-23 GotIt!

Princeton University Press is excited to offer a new way for ebook customers to read our content: via the subscription platforms Scribd and Oyster. Think of them as “Netflix for ebooks.” Subscribers pay a modest monthly fee in return for which they have access to the entire library of content on the platform – that is, from all publishers who participate – and can browse and read in entirety as many books as they want. PUP is offering 2,000+ titles and joins major publishers like HarperCollins, Simon & Schuster, and Perseus. You can access and sync content on multiple devices through iOS, Android, and KindleFire apps. We’re always looking to meet our customers where they live – check them out!

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A letter from Ingrid Gnerlich, Executive Editor of Physical and Earth Sciences

Photo on 2014-05-14Dear Readers:

As many of you will know, in November 2013, the remarkable astrophysicist, Dimitri Mihalas – a pioneering mind in computational astrophysics, and a world leader in the fields of radiation transport, radiation hydrodynamics, and astrophysical quantitative spectroscopy – passed away.  Though deeply saddened by this news, I also feel a unique sense of honor that, this year, I am able to announce the much-anticipated text, Theory of Stellar Atmospheres:  An Introduction to Astrophysical Non-equilibrium Quantitative Spectroscopic Analysis, co-authored by Ivan Hubeny and Dimitri Mihalas.  This book is the most recent publication in our Princeton Series in Astrophysics (David Spergel, advising editor), and it is a complete revision of Mihalas’s Stellar Atmospheres, first published in 1970 and considered by many to be the “bible” of the field.  This new edition serves to provide a state of the art synthesis of the theory and methods of the quantitative spectroscopic analysis of the observable outer layers of stars.  Designed to be self-contained, beginning upper-level undergraduate and graduate-level students will find it accessible, while advanced students, researchers, and professionals will also gain deeper insight from its pages.  I look forward to bringing this very special book to the attention of a wide readership of students and researchers.

It is also with profound excitement that I would like to announce the imminent publication of Kip Thorne and Roger Blandford’s Modern Classical Physics:  Optics, Fluids, Plasmas, Elasticity, Relativity, and Statistical Physics.  This is a first-year, graduate-level introduction to the fundamental concepts and 21st-century applications of six major branches of classical physics that every masters- or PhD-level physicist should be exposed to, but often isn’t.  Early readers have described the manuscript as “splendid,” “audacious,” and a “tour de force,” and I couldn’t agree more.  Stay tuned!

Lastly, it is a pleasure to announce a number of newly and vibrantly redesigned books in our popular-level series, the Princeton Science Library.  These include Richard Alley’s The Two-Mile Time Machine, which Elizabeth Kolbert has called a “fascinating” work that “will make you look at the world in a new way” (The Week), as well as G. Polya’s bestselling must-read, How to Solve It.  In addition, the classics by Einstein, The Meaning of Relativity, with an introduction by Brian Greene, and Feynman, QED, introduced by A. Zee, are certainly not to be missed.

Of course, these are just a few of the many new books on the Princeton list I hope you’ll explore.  My thanks to you all—readers, authors, and trusted advisors—for your enduring support. I hope that you enjoy our books and that you will continue to let me know what you would like to read in the future.

Ingrid Gnerlich
Executive Editor, Physical & Earth Sciences

Recent NATION Article Highlights University Presses

The Nation‘s Scott Sherman takes a close look at institutions like Princeton University Press in a recent article entitled “University Presses Under Fire: How the Internet and slashed budgets have endangered one of higher education’s most important institutions.” Sherman writes:

… the network of university presses has become a vibrant part of the publishing ecosystem. It encompasses giants such as Oxford University Press, which has fifty-two offices around the world, as well as Duquesne University Press, which specializes in medieval and Renaissance studies. University presses publish a vast range of scholarship, but they also publish a dizzying array of books that are unlikely to find a home at Manhattan’s large commercial publishers. Consider some recent offerings: Jean Drèze and Amartya Sen’s An Uncertain Glory: India and Its Contradictions (Princeton); Rebecca Solnit and Rebecca Snedeker’s Unfathomable City: A New Orleans Atlas (California); Two Prospectors: The Letters of Sam Shepard and Johnny Dark (Texas), edited by Chad Hammett; and Warren Hoffman’s The Great White Way: Race and the Broadway Musical (Rutgers).

University presses don’t just publish books: they keep books in print and rescue out-of-print books from obscurity. Thanks to the University of Minnesota Press, there is an attractive new edition of Gary Giddins’s Celebrating Bird: The Triumph of Charlie Parker (1986). “People sometimes dismiss university press publications as low-selling, but that underestimates their cultural importance and influence,” says Doug Armato, director of the University of Minnesota Press. “When you look at the endnotes of bestselling serious books—Robert Caro’s biographies of Lyndon Johnson are a good example—you see how much they are built on work published by university presses.” And occasionally there is a runaway success: Thomas Piketty’s Capital in the Twenty-First Century is published by Harvard University Press.

Read the article in its entirety through the Nation.

 

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Princeton University Press’s best-selling titles for the last week

These are the best-selling books for the past week.

 

GDP: A Brief but Affectionate History by Diane Coyle
Tesla: Inventor of the Electrical Age by W. Bernard Carlson Tesla: Inventor of the Electrical Age by W. Bernard Carlson
On Bullshit by Harry G. Frankfurt
The Limits of Partnership: U.S.-Russian Relations in the Twenty-First Century by Angela E. Stent
Fragile by Design: The Political Origins of Banking Crises and Scarce Credit by Charles W. Calomiris & Stephen H. Haber
1177 BC: The Year Civilization Collapsed by Eric H. Cline
Rare Birds of North America by Steve Howell, Ian Lewington, and Will Russell
Revolutionary Ideas: An Intellectual History of the French Revolution from The Rights of Man to Robespierre by Jonathan Israel
The Dollar Trap: How the U.S. Dollar Tightened Its Grip on Global Finance by Eswar S. Prasad
The Box: How the Shipping Container Made the World Smaller and the World Economy Bigger by Marc Levinson

Princeton University Press’s Best-selling Books for the Past Week

These are the best-selling books for the past week.

 

Rare Birds of North America by Steve Howell, Ian Lewington, and Will Russell
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Ten Thousand Birds: Ornithology since Darwin
by Tim Birkhead, Jo Wimpenny, and Bob Montgomerie
Beautiful Geometry by Eli Maor and Eugen Jost
The Dollar Trap: How the U.S. Dollar Tightened Its Grip on Global Finance by Eswar S. Prasad
Tesla: Inventor of the Electrical Age by W. Bernard Carlson Tesla: Inventor of the Electrical Age by W. Bernard Carlson
The Founder’s Dilemmas: Anticipating and Avoiding the Pitfalls That Can Sink a Startup by Noam Wasserman
What W.H. Auden Can Do for You by Alexander McCall-Smith
The Box: How the Shipping Container Made the World Smaller and the World Economy Bigger by Marc Levinson
The 5 Elements of Effective Thinking by Edward Burger and Michael Starbird
On Bullshit by Harry G. Frankfurt