Throwback Thursday #TBT: Selected Letters of C. G. Jung, 1909-1961

Jung, Selected Letters, 1909-1961

Hello everybody! It’s Thursday again, and for this week’s Throwback (#TBT), we’re celebrating the Selected Letters of C. G. Jung, 1909-1961. The letters collected in this volume chronicle the founder of analytical psychology’s correspondence with friends, colleagues, and the people who came to him with problems. They also provide crucial insights into the beginnings of his theories and trace their development over the years.

Originally published in 1984, Selected Letters is one of many texts brought back by the Princeton Legacy Library series. It is also part of Princeton University Press’s esteemed Bollingen Series, named after the very Swiss village where Jung maintained a personal retreat.

That’s all for now, folks. See you next Thursday!

 

Throwback Thursday #TBT: Erwin Goodenough’s Jewish Symbols in the Greco-Roman Period (1992)


Throwback Thursday: Week 3


Goodenough, Jewish Symbols in the Greco-Roman Period

It’s Thursday again, folks, and you know what that means: time for a Throwback (#TBT)! This week’s #TBT honors Erwin Goodenough’s Jewish Symbols in the Greco-Roman Period (1992), another fundamental text found in the Princeton Legacy Library. Here’s a little bit of information on your favorite relic – both a literal and figurative designation, in this case:

This volume presents the most important portions of Erwin Goodenough’s classic thirteen-volume work, a magisterial attempt to encompass human spiritual history in general through the study of Jewish symbols in particular. Revealing that the Jewish religion of the period was much more varied and complex than the extant Talmudic literature would lead us to believe, Goodenough offered evidence for the existence of a Hellenistic-Jewish mystic mythology far closer to the Qabbalah than to rabbinical Judaism.

David M. Hay of Studia Philonia Annual 1 praises the volume, saying that, “[s]ince [Jacob Neusner's one-volume abridgement] presents the fruits of Goodenough’s decades-long study of ancient Jewish art, climaxed by his study of the third-century synagogue at Dura-Europas, it is probably the best introduction to Goodenough’s mature thought. Neusner contributes a twenty-nine-page foreword that explains the enduring importance of the entire thirteen-volume work.”

And if we’ve peaked your interest with this book, you can find similar materials over in Mythos: The Princeton/Bollingen Series in World Mythology. We hope you’ve enjoyed this edition of Throwback Thursday (#TBT), and we’ll see you next week!

Announcing Throwback Thursdays: Celebrating the Revival of the Princeton Legacy Library


THE PRINCETON LEGACY LIBRARY


PLL

On July 14th, 2014, Princeton University Press began to breathe life back into over 3,000 out of print books. How, you might wonder?

Answer: the Princeton Legacy Library.

Director of the Press Peter J. Dougherty summed up this development in the Press’s release statement, saying that past publications are now “readily available to readers all over the world,” and that “researchers and students in many developing countries will have access to our historical titles for the first time ever.” These books will be available digitally in both print-on-demand editions, and as ebooks for libraries and scholarly institutions through leading library aggregators.

And if you’re like me and you’re into “old book smell” and appropriately vintage filters, you’ll appreciate our new weekly series, aptly titled “Throwback Thursday.” For the first several weeks, we’ll be posting pictures of books that this grand effort is reviving, coupled with brief descriptions of their content. Although these books are no longer enshrined in the original jackets that appear in the pictures, the content remains the same: original, informative, and of the highest academic caliber. It’ll be great fun to glance back at these texts with our audience; we’ve already scoured the stacks to find old favorites like Gladys Reichard’s Navaho Religion and Bruce Aune’s Kant’s Theory of Morals, so be on the lookout!

We’ll eventually work our way to hidden PUP gems that, while not included in the Legacy Library, are certainly worth mentioning (no one would dare discount The Collected Works of Samuel Coleridge). Let us know in the comments section which ones you own, and which ones you’re looking forward to reading. See you on Thursday!

Princeton University Press Launches Princeton Legacy Library

Princeton University Press Launches Princeton Legacy Library

More than 3,000 Out-of-Print Books from Its Celebrated Backlist will become available through Ingram Content Group

Princeton Legacy Library Web site: http://press.princeton.edu/princeton-legacy-library

On Monday, July 14, 2014, Princeton University Press will introduce the Princeton Legacy Library (PLL), its newly digitized out-of-print backlist. The PLL will make Princeton’s backlist titles available digitally through Ingram Content Group in both print-on-demand editions and as ebooks for libraries and scholarly institutions through leading library aggregators.

According to Press Director Peter J. Dougherty, “By digitizing our backlist in the Princeton Legacy Library, the Press has used the latest technology to make our past publications readily available to readers all over the world. Researchers and students in many developing countries will have access to our historical titles for the first time ever.”

On July 14, over 1,200 titles will be released in the Princeton Legacy Library with subsequent batches planned through 2016, moving backward through Princeton University Press’s vaunted publishing history. Books included in the first installment will cover the years from approximately 1980 to 2000. When completed, the program will include over 3,000 titles. Notable titles this year include George Kennan’s Russia Leaves the War. Volume 1 of Soviet-American Relations(1986), John Wheeler’s edited Quantum Theory and Measurement (1983), Gladys Reichard’s Navaho Religion (1963), Sandra Zimdars-Swartz’s Encountering Mary: From La Salette to Medjugorje (1991), and John Polkinghorne’s The Faith of a Physicist: Reflections on a Bottom-Up Thinker (1994).

“It’s gratifying to know that our work and innovation at Ingram Content Group is making a program such as the Princeton Legacy Library possible,” said John Ingram, Ingram Content Group’s Chairman and CEO, and ’83 graduate of Princeton University. “Reviving out-of-print works so they continue to be resources for learning is one of the many ways we are using new technology to improve accessibility and availability of reading material on a global scale. On many levels, I’m pleased that Ingram is partnering with Princeton University Press to support their pursuit to provide scholarly content to learners around the world.”

“This project has been made possible in large part by advances in digital technology,” according to Assistant Director and Director of Marketing Adam Fortgang, who noted, “Over the past few years, the Press has seen a significant increase in demand for our out-of-print books and, with the advent of improved scanning technology, we felt we could fulfill our scholarly mission by making high-quality digital editions of these books available once again.”

Produced using the latest print-on-demand technology, these paperback editions preserve the original texts of these important books and present them in durable and affordable volumes for new generations of readers.

Working closely with Ingram, the Press developed a system to automate the creation of paperback covers to give the Princeton Legacy Library a standard look and format. The cover designs were created by Tom Geismar of the distinguished graphic design firm, Chermayeff & Geismar & Haviv. All books in the Library will be available digitally for libraries and institutions. Initially, the ebook versions will not be available via retailers until sufficient demand warrants additional conversions.

In keeping with the fundamental mission of Princeton University Press, the Princeton Legacy Library continues the Press’s commitment, “to disseminating the highest quality scholarship (through print and digital media) both within academia and to society at large. Princeton University Press seeks to publish the innovative works of the greatest minds in academia, from the most respected senior scholar to the extraordinarily promising graduate student, in each of the disciplines in which we publish.”

 

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