William H. Waller Brings the Stars to The Huffington Post

William H. WallerWilliam H. Waller, astronomist and author of The Milky Way: An Insider’s Guide, recently wrote an article that was picked up by The Huffington Post for their blog. Based on this bio page that was also posted for Waller on HuffPost, we’re hoping this means he will be writing regularly about science and the stars, especially with some of the amazing pictures included in the article.


The post, which focuses on our ability to visibly see the Milky Way with all of the light pollution in the air, starts by saying:

The Milky Way“For most of human history, the night sky demanded our attention. The shape-shifting Moon, wandering planets, pointillist stars, and occasional comet enchanted our sensibilities while inspiring diverse tales of origin. The Milky Way, in particular, exerted a powerful presence on our distant ancestors. Rippling across the firmament, this irregular band of ghostly light evoked myriad myths of life and death among the stars. In 1609, Galileo Galilei pointed his telescope heavenward and discovered that the Milky Way is “nothing but a congeries of innumerable stars grouped together in clusters.” Fast forward 400 years to the present day, and we find that the Milky Way has all but disappeared from our collective consciousness. Where did it go?”

To read the rest of the article on The Huffington Post, click here.


This book offers an intimate guide to the Milky Way, taking readers on a grand tour of our home Galaxy’s structure, genesis, and evolution, based on the latest astronomical findings. In engaging language, it tells how the Milky Way congealed from blobs of gas and dark matter into a spinning starry abode brimming with diverse planetary systems–some of which may be hosting myriad life forms and perhaps even other technologically communicative species.

Waller makes the case that our very existence is inextricably linked to the Galaxy that spawned us. Through this book, readers can become well-informed galactic “insiders”–ready to imagine humanity’s next steps as fully engaged citizens of the Milky Way.

William H. Waller is an astronomer, science educator, and writer. He lives with his family in Rockport, Massachusetts, where he can still see the Milky Way on dark moonless nights.

New Physics and Astrophysics Catalog!

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Of particular interest are our forthcoming titles including William H. Waller’s navigation of a journey through The Milky Way: An Insider’s Guide and Jeremiah P. Ostriker and Simon Mitton’s rich Heart of Darkness: Unraveling the Mysteries of the Invisible Universe.

Also noteworthy are A. Zee’s unique Einstein Gravity in a Nutshell and Anupam Garg’s comprehensive Classical Electromagnetism in a Nutshell, each of our In a Nutshell series–a concise, accessible, and up-to-date collection of textbooks for advanced undergraduates and graduate students on key subjects in the physical sciences.

You will also find other essential textbooks including Biophysics: Searching for Principles by William Bialek and Why You Hear What You Hear: An Experiential Approach to Sound, Music, and Psychoacoustics by Eric J. Heller. Browse the catalog to discover other titles ranging in theme from topological insulators to climate dynamics.

To further whet your appetite, don’t miss our new titles including Abraham Loeb and Steven R. Furlanetto’s comprehensive The First Galaxies in the Universe, W. Patrick McCray’s fascinating The Visioneers: How a Group of Elite Scientists Pursued Space Colonies, Nanotechnologies, and a Limitless Future, and Donald K. Yeomans’ behind-the-scenes Near-Earth Objects: Finding Them Before They Find Us.

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We’ll see everyone at the meeting of the American Astronomical Society January 6-10 in Long Beach, CA. Come visit us at booth 301!