Browse Our New Art & Architecture 2017 Catalog

Our new Art & Architecture catalog includes a major new work by Hans Belting, a stunning reinterpretation of the paintings of Bosch and Bruegel, and the latest in Michel Pastoureau’s series on color, Red.

If you will be at the CAA meeting in New York next week, please stop by booth 609 where we will have all these books on display and you can pick up a copy of the catalog in person. In addition, we will be holding a special event on the Thursday evening:

Reception and Book Signing
Princeton University Press, Booth 609
Thursday, February 16, 2017
5 p.m. to 6 p.m.

Princeton University Press celebrates the publication of the two most recent volumes in the A. W. Mellon Lectures in the Fine Arts series, Bosch and Bruegel: From Enemy Painting to Everyday Life, by Joseph Leo Koerner, and Chinese Painting and its Audiences, by Craig Clunas. Please join us for wine and cheese. Joseph Koerner will be signing copies of Bosch and Bruegel. The A. W. Mellon Lectures are published in association with the National Gallery of Art, Washington.

Following his acclaimed books Black and Green, Michel Pastoureau digs into the history of a color with powerful cultural associations, from warfare and religion to love and passion: Red. Through February we will be giving away copies of Red on Goodreads, Twitter and Instagram: visit our Giveaways page for further details on how you can enter the giveaway.

Red by Michel Pastoureau

Based on his lecture series for the  2008 A. W. Mellon Lectures in the Fine Arts, Joseph Leo Koerner’s Bosch and Bruegel: From Enemy Painting to Everyday Life analyses the links between the great Dutch painters Hieronymous Bosch and Pieter Bruegel and demonstrates the emergence of Bruegel’s scenes of everyday life from Bosch’s hellish phantasmagorias.

Bosch and Bruegel, by Joseph Leo Koerner

In Face and Mask, Hans Belting embarks on a full cultural history and anthropology of the face across the full breadth of human civilization, and explores the paradox by which, despite ever increasing verisimilitude, representations of the face inevitably become a hollow signifier, the mask.

Face and Mask, by Hans Belting

Find these titles and many more in our Art & Architecture 2017 catalog.

PUP News of the World — September 17, 2014

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Each week we post a round-up of some of our most exciting national and international PUP book coverage. Reviews, interviews, events, articles–this is the spot for coverage of all things “PUP books” that took place in the last week. Enjoy!


now 9.17

More Than You Wanted to Know

How much time do you take to read the iTunes terms you assent to, the doctor’s consent form you sign, or the pile of papers you get with your mortgage? Reading the terms, the form, and the papers is supposed to equip you to choose your purchase, your treatment, and your loan well. However, Omri Ben-Shahar & Carl E. Schneider’s More Than You Wanted to Know: The Failure of Mandated Disclosure surveys the evidence and finds that mandated disclosure rarely works. But how could it? Who reads these disclosures? Who understands them? Who uses them to make better choices?

Omri Ben-Shahar discusses the purpose and shortcomings of mandated disclosures in two recent interviews with Chicago Tonight and NPR’s All Things Considered. Check out both interviews below. You may not read Facebook’s Terms and Conditions, but we bet that you will want to read the introduction to this timely and provocative book.

 

Green

Which color provides a link between luck, greed, poison, and life? Michel Pastoureau’s new book, Green: The History of a Color, demonstrates that the history of the color is, to a large degree, one of dramatic reversal: long absent, ignored, or rejected, green today has become a ubiquitous and soothing presence as the symbol of environmental causes and the mission to save the planet.

In this beautiful and richly illustrated book, the acclaimed author of Blue and Black presents a fascinating and revealing history of the color green in European societies from prehistoric times to today. Examining the evolving place of green in art, clothes, literature, religion, science, and everyday life, Michel Pastoureau traces how culture has profoundly changed the perception and meaning of the color over millennia—and how we misread cultural, social, and art history when we assume that colors have always signified what they do today.

Green is reviewed in the New York Review of Books, where Michael Gorra writes:

“[S]umptuously illustrated….These are books to look at, but they are also books to read….Individual colors find their being only in relation to each other, and their cultural force depends on the particular instance of their use. They have no separate life or essential meaning. They have been made to mean, and in these volumes that human endeavor has found its historian.”

Michael Glover at the Independent calls the book “…ceaselessly fascinating and erudite.” Preview the introduction of Green here.

The Age of the Vikings

Were the Vikings really invincible warriors who wore horned helmets? PUP author Anders Winroth dispels these and other rumors in The Age of the Vikings. The Vikings maintain their grip on our imagination, but their image is too often distorted by medieval and modern myth. It is true that they pillaged, looted, and enslaved. But they also settled peacefully and developed a vast trading network. They traveled far from their homelands in swift and sturdy ships, not only to raid, but also to explore.

By exploring every major facet of this exciting age, Anders Winroth captures the innovation and pure daring of the Vikings without glossing over their destructive heritage. He shows how the Vikings seized on the boundless opportunities made possible by the invention of the longship, using it to venture to Europe for plunder, to open new trade routes, and to settle in lands as distant as Russia, Greenland, and the Byzantine Empire.

The Age of the Vikings is reviewed in the New York Review of Books. Eric Christiansen writes:

“[Winroth] has an impressive knowledge of the sources, the archaeology, and the modern historical literature….Winroth really knows what he is writing about, and has done the research….I recommend the work to anyone with little knowledge of the subject and a wish to learn more.”

For more on these infamous berserkers, check out Michael Kane’s review The Age of the Vikings in the New York Post. In an article entitled “Everything you thought you knew about the Vikings is wrong,” Kane reviews Winroth’s explanation of the Vikings’ reputation. Kane writes:

Winroth illustrates the barbarian misconception by noting two words in usage today with Old Norse roots are “berserk” (literally meaning “bear-shirts,” from the Vikings’ attire) and “ransack” (from “ranna” meaning house and “saka” meaning search). Guys in bear shirts looking around. Much nicer than berserk ransackers.

So, why do we think of Vikings as one-dimensional, casting them as nothing more than an ax-wielding invasion force pulling up to shorelines around Europe and the British Isles in longboats?

Winroth believes it’s because the frequent victims of their raids were those with “a monopoly on writing.” Who wrote and preserved the texts of the time? Ripped-off monks. It’s no wonder that in Latin scrolls from the era that Vikings got a bad rep as “a most vile people” and a “filthy race” hell-bent on slaughtering and laying waste to the innocents.

Be sure to take a look at the full review on the New York Post‘s website.

Lastly, The Age of the Vikings is reviewed in the Literary Review:

“This book should prove a fascinating and rewarding read for those seeking to deepen their understanding of the Viking world”

– Philip Parker, Literary Review