#MammothMonday: What’s Next?

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In today’s #MammothMonday exclusive video, Beth Shapiro, author of How to Clone a Mammoth: The Science of De-extinction, raises big questions about cloning technology and explains how she feels this controversial technology should be used.

[vimeo:https://vimeo.com/123646254]

You can also listen to Shapiro’s interview on NPR from this past weekend, where she discussed the motivations for bringing back an extinct species, along with some of the specific risks involved with releasing genetically engineered elephants into the wild.

Read Chapter 1, here.

#MammothMonday: How Does the Science of De-Extinction Work?

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Happy #MammothMonday! Today, Beth Shapiro clarifies the science of de-extinction. As she explains, if scientists possess a tiny bit of living tissue from a species that has gone extinct recently, they can bring back that animal through traditional means. However, if the species has been extinct for millions of years and there is no living tissue, the process of bringing the animal back to life is far more difficult. Beth had a terrific piece in the Chronicle of Higher Education recently that offers much more info, and geneticists have been sounding off on the discussion as well. Check out today’s original video:

[vimeo:https://vimeo.com/123646252]

Read about de-extinction, in How to Clone a Mammoth: The Science of De-extinction. Preview Chapter 1.

#MammothMonday: Could We Bring Back the Passenger Pigeon?

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Just days ago, scientists were finally successful in sequencing the full mammoth genome. Beth Shapiro, author of How to Clone a Mammoth offered commentary on this exciting and ethically controversial achievement. According to the BBC News, “A US team is already attempting to study the animals’ characteristics by inserting mammoth genes into elephant stem cells.”

For today’s #MammothMonday, Beth Shapiro expresses her doubts and concerns about bringing back the passenger pigeon, pointing out the unique difficulties involved in cloning a bird. Learn more about Shapiro’s reasoning in the video below.

[vimeo:https://vimeo.com/123646253]

Be sure to pick up a copy of How to Clone a Mammoth. You can read Chapter 1, here. Interested in learning more about passenger pigeons? Check out The Passenger Pigeon by Errol Fuller. Read the Introduction.

#MammothMonday: Can We Clone a Mammoth?

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In today’s #MammothMonday post, Beth Shapiro addresses a frequently asked question, “Can we clone a mammoth, if so when is it going to happen?”  In answering, Shapiro brings up a crucial point: What is the audience willing to consider a mammoth? Find out her answer and learn more about How to Clone a Mammoth: The Science of De-Extinction in this video:

[vimeo:https://vimeo.com/123645248]

Be sure to read Chapter 1.

#MammothMonday: What to Bring Back?

How to Clone a Mammoth

Welcome to another #MammothMonday. Beth Shapiro, author of How to Clone a Mammoth, was recently called by Brian Switek of National Geographic, “the perfect guide to the ongoing discussion about de-extinction.” Today, she continues in that role, answering the question, “What to Bring Back?” In this fascinating video, Beth discusses the thinking behind the decision to bring back a large mammal as opposed to passenger pigeons.

[vimeo:http://vimeo.com/123644108]

What do you think about the debate around cloning mammoths?

Behind the scenes of the “How to Clone a Mammoth” trailer

Shapiro Image for blog 4.1.15We recently shared the terrific new trailer for How to Clone a Mammoth: The Science of De-Extinction. Today’s Mammoth Monday showcases its creation from idea to final product. Peter Durand, the wonderfully innovative director at Alphachimp, wrote a fascinating article for their blog describing the process.

In the fall of 2014, I ran into Beth and her mammoth bones again…I was fortunate enough to scribe for both her National Academies of Science public presentation, part of the Distinctive Voices lecture series. Once again, Beth’s presentation, her personality, and her message were a hit…After her presentation, we looked at the resulting image, and I did not even have to pitch her…we both had the same idea: “We totally have to animate this!”

Read the article and view the images that inspired the process here.

What is De-extinction? #MammothMonday

To celebrate the release of Beth Shapiro’s How to Clone a Mammoth: The Science of De-Extinction, we will be providing a variety behind-the-scenes footage, Q&As, pictures, and videos every Monday. Last week, we posted the wonderful trailer for the book. Since then, the topic of De-extinction has been captivating scholars and animal-lovers alike. From a recent Earth Times piece highlighting De-extinction:

Professor George Church plans to insert these genes into Asian elephant embryos and study how they develop. His viewpoint is that we have caused so much extinction, the means of recreating recently extinct (about 3,300 years only according to remains on Wrangel Island in Siberia) species should be useful technology. The name of the worthy-enough game is “De-extinction.”

Today, we are excited to share an original video of Beth Shapiro explaining what exactly De-extinction is, the first in a series of six original videos tied to her book:

[youtube:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RSrNTnOw6fw&feature=youtu.be]