New Mathematics Catalog!

Be among the first to browse and download our new mathematics catalog!

Of particular interest is Undiluted Hocus-Pocus: The Autobiography of Martin Gardner. Gardner takes readers from his childhood in Oklahoma to his college days at the University of Chicago, his service in the navy, and his varied and wide-ranging professional pursuits. Before becoming a columnist for Scientific American, he was a caseworker in Chicago during the Great Depression, a reporter for the Tulsa Tribune, an editor for Humpty Dumpty, and a short-story writer for Esquire, among other jobs. Gardner shares colorful anecdotes about the many fascinating people he met and mentored, and voices strong opinions on the subjects that matter to him most, from his love of mathematics to his uncompromising stance against pseudoscience. For Gardner, our mathematically structured universe is undiluted hocus-pocus—a marvelous enigma, in other words. Undiluted Hocus-Pocus offers a rare, intimate look at Gardner’s life and work, and the experiences that shaped both.

Also be sure to note Wizards, Aliens, and Starships: Physics and Math in Fantasy and Science Fiction by Charles L. Adler. From teleportation and space elevators to alien contact and interstellar travel, science fiction and fantasy writers have come up with some brilliant and innovative ideas. Yet how plausible are these ideas—for instance, could Mr. Weasley’s flying car in the Harry Potter books really exist? Which concepts might actually happen, and which ones wouldn’t work at all? Wizards, Aliens, and Starships delves into the most extraordinary details in science fiction and fantasy–such as time warps, shape changing, rocket launches, and illumination by floating candle—and shows readers the physics and math behind the phenomena.

And don’t miss out on Beautiful Geometry by Eli Maor and Eugen Jost. If you’ve ever thought that mathematics and art don’t mix, this stunning visual history of geometry will change your mind. As much a work of art as a book about mathematics, Beautiful Geometry presents more than sixty exquisite color plates illustrating a wide range of geometric patterns and theorems, accompanied by brief accounts of the fascinating history and people behind each. With artwork by Swiss artist Eugen Jost and text by acclaimed math historian Eli Maor, this unique celebration of geometry covers numerous subjects, from straightedge-and-compass constructions to intriguing configurations involving infinity. The result is a delightful and informative illustrated tour through the 2,500-year-old history of one of the most important and beautiful branches of mathematics.

Even more foremost titles in mathematics can be found in the catalog. You may also sign up with ease to be notified of forthcoming titles at http://press.princeton.edu/subscribe/. Your e-mail address will remain confidential!

If you’re heading to the Joint Mathematics Meeting in Baltimore, MD, January 15th-18th, come visit us at booth 407. We’ll be hosting the following book signings:

The 5 Elements of Effective Thinking, Edward B. Burger and Michael Starbird
Wednesday, January 15th 4:30-5:30 p.m.

Wizards, Aliens, and Starships: Physics and Math in Fantasy and Science Fiction, Charles L. Adler
Thursday, January 16th 11:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

Also stop by 629, the Martin Gardner Centennial Booth. Staffed by a team of enthusiasts who have long been inspired by Gardner, there will be interactive activities and different handouts and puzzles to enjoy each day. Don’t miss “Martin Gardner’s Outreach in His Centennial Year: Mathematics Awareness Month 2014,” a short talk by Colm Mulcahy, Bruce Torrence, and Eve Torrence, Saturday, January 18th at 1:00 p.m. in Convention Center room 346.

Follow @MGardner100th on Twitter for more updates throughout the year, and #JMM14 and @PrincetonUnivPress for updates and information on our new and forthcoming titles throughout the meeting. See you there!

In Celebration of Mathematicians

This week San Diego, California is home to the largest mathematics meeting in the world. Hosted by the Mathematical Association of America (MAA) and the American Mathematical Society (AMS), the 2013 Joint Mathematics Meeting is more than just panels and presentations—it is a mass gathering of people who are passionate about mathematics.

Mathematicians come from diverse backgrounds, maintain varying interests, and have their own unique journeys. In Fascinating Mathematical People: Interviews and Memoirs, Fern Hunt describes what it was like to be among the first black women to earn a PhD in mathematics, Harold Bacon makes trips to Alcatraz to help a prisoner learn calculus, and Thomas Banchoff, who first became interested in the fourth dimension while reading a Captain Marvel comic, relates his fascinating friendship with Salvador Dalí and their shared passion for art, mathematics, and the profound connection between the two. But whether they view mathematics as reason, art, or something else, all mathematicians are in search of truth.

This week is not only an endeavor in furthering the pursuit of knowledge, but a celebration of the gifted mathematical intellectuals who shape society, culture, and our awareness and understanding of ourselves and the world in which we live. Browse our website or latest mathematics catalog to see more by and about mathematicians, such as Paul J. Nahin’s The Logician and the Engineer: How George Boole and Claude Shannon Created the Information Age. If you’re at the Joint Mathematics Meeting, you may even visit us at booth 311. As Underwood Dudley wrote in “What Is Mathematics For?” included in The Best Writing on Mathematics: 2011 (The Best Writing on Mathematics: 2012 also available.), “What mathematics education is for is not for jobs. It is to teach the race to reason,” and we’ve all got room to learn.

New Mathematics Catalog!

Be among the first to check out our new mathematics catalog!
http://press.princeton.edu/catalogs/math13.pdf

Of particular interest are Alexander J. Hahn’s eye-opening Mathematical Excursions to the World’s Great Buildings, Glen Van Brummelen’s rich Heavenly Mathematics: The Forgotten Art of Spherical Trigonometry, and Dana Mackenzie’s lucid The Universe in Zero Words: The Story of Mathematics as Told through Equations. Also be sure to check out our textbooks, including Anne Greenbaum and Timothy P. Chartier’s Numerical Methods: Design, Analysis, and Computer Implementation of Algorithms, a clear and concise exploration of standard numerical analysis topics, as well as nontraditional ones, including mathematical modeling, Monte Carlo methods, Markov chains, and fractals.

The selection of critical, cutting-edge titles abounds, so if you’re interested in learning more about our other mathematics books, browse our catalog. You may also sign up to stay current on our publishing endeavors with ease here: http://press.princeton.edu/subscribe/ Your email address will remain confidential!

We’ll also see you at the Joint Mathematics Meeting January 9-12 in San Diego, CA at booth 311! The following book signings will be held at our booth:

Wednesday, January 9
2:00 p.m.-3:00 p.m., Glen Van Brummelen, Heavenly Mathematics: The Forgotten Art of Spherical Trigonometry

Thursday, January 10
1:30 p.m.-2:30 p.m., Alexander J. Hahn, Mathematical Excursions to the World’s Great Buildings
3:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m., Michael Starbird, The 5 Elements of Effective Thinking

Friday, January 11
11:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m., Persi Diaconis and Ron Graham, Magical Mathematics: The Mathematical Ideas That Animate Great Magic Tricks
1:00 p.m.-2:00 p.m., Dana Mackenzie, The Universe in Zero Words: The Story of Mathematics as Told through Equations
3:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m., Siobhan Roberts, Wind Wizard: Alan G. Davenport and the Art of Wind Engineering

Also, stop booth 311 to chat about March Mathness! We’re aiming to double last year’s six participating schools with a goal of twelve in 2013, providing entertainment for math and basketball aficionados alike! Find out more here in the meantime: http://blog.press.princeton.edu/march-mathness/