Rebecca Bengoechea on the Guadalajara Book Fair

Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico: the home of mariachi, tequila, and since 1987, the Feria del Libros Internacional (FIL), Latin America’s premier bookfair. This year, PUP’s Rights team were delighted to visit for the first time.

The fair boasts publishers from over 44 countries, from the bigger markets of Argentina, Brazil and of course Mexico, all the way down to Panama, Costa Rica and Uruguay. There were stands converted into bookshops, from the colossal stands of publishers such as Planeta or Fondo de Cultura, to the tiny used and antique English-language book shop. The Guest of Honour this year was Portugal, and we were thrilled to see that there were a number of Portuguese publishers who made the trip. The fair’s professional days of Monday-Wednesday are book-ended by the fair being open to the public, and this dynamic really lent a special atmosphere to the events, with children and enthusiastic students reminding us why we are all in the book business!

Following a visit to Spain back in May where I was able to explore the Spanish market, I was very eager to broaden my scope further to Latin America and the Spanish speaking market. As with PUP’s recent attentions in China, any chance to increase our presence in Latin America goes a long way to making PUP a truly global press.

We were guided by PUP’s new Director for Rights, Contracts, and Permissions, Ines ter Horst, who had attended the fair before and who has extensive contacts in the different markets. We were based in the Rights Centre, but also took meetings on various publisher’s stands, attended some very important wine & empanada (Argentina) and rum & chocolate (Venezuelan/Chilean) networking events, and the wonderful reception at the biggest bookshop in Guadalajara, the Libreria de Carlos Fuentes.

It was an immersive experience; a whirlwind of meetings, receptions, a fantastic programme of talks, food, not to mention the all-important salsa music that lent the fair a truly Latin flavour. Unlike other book fairs such as Frankfurt where our intensive schedules are usually fully-booked months in advance, Guadalajara’s charm was a more relaxed atmosphere that allowed us to capitalise on spontaneous opportunities and meet with people we would otherwise not have encountered. Our days were still filled, but with more in-depth discussions, market research, and crucially invaluable networking that we hope will bear fruit in the years to come.  

The Rights team were there, as with the other annual book fairs we attend, primarily with the aim of meeting with publishers from various countries, promoting our books, and discussing the possibilities for translation licenses. We were also able to wear various other hats during the fair; embracing discussions about the sales and distribution of our English language books, the developments in Print On Demand schemes in Latin America, and listening to news of Spanish language projects that our editors might want to acquire and publish with PUP.

The fair was full of energy, optimism, fun, and the spirit of collaboration. It provided wonderful insights into a vast and vibrant Spanish-speaking ecosystem, perhaps too often neglected by the Anglophone world. The enthusiasm was infectious and we came away filled with excitement, already frantically planning our return next year where we hope to make an even bigger splash.

Announcing the 2018 Bookselling Without Borders International Book Fair Scholarship for US Booksellers

NEW YORK, New York (January 16, 2018) — A partnership of seven independent publishers (Catapult, Europa Editions, Graywolf, The New Press, Other Press, Princeton University Press, Rutgers University Press) announces the 2018 Bookselling Without Borders international book fair scholarship for US booksellers.

This unique program, now in its third year, will send booksellers on all-expenses-paid trips to the world’s premier book fairs, including the Turin Book Fair, the Frankfurt Book Fair, and the Guadalajara International Book Fair.

Fairs like these have long been important gatherings of the book industry. In order to connect American booksellers to global book conversations and to integrate them into the international book community, participating booksellers will be treated to customized itineraries at select fairs: specially developed panels, meetings, seminars, and receptions with their international counterparts, authors, and publishers.

“If the idea was to make me think more expansively about the role that books from other places should play in my life as a bookseller, the scholarship was spectacularly successful.”—David Sandberg, owner of Porter Square Books in Cambridge, MA and 2017 scholarship recipient.

In addition to its seven partner publishers, Bookselling Without Borders is generously supported by Ingram Content Group, as well as by over 250 individual donors who contributed more than $30,000 through a successful Kickstarter campaign in 2017.

Booksellers interested in diverse and international literature, in fostering relationships with the international bookselling community, and in traveling to some of the world’s great literary cities are encouraged to apply by visiting booksellingwithoutborders.com during the application period, January 17 through February 28.

Scholarship recipients will be announced in March 2018.

For further information contact: Steve Kroeter; Program coordinator; Bookselling Without Borders; swk@design101.com; 718-636-1345

Vickie Kearn kicks off Global Math Week

October 10 – 17 marks the first ever Global Math Week. This is exciting for many reasons and if you go to the official website, you’ll find that there are already 736,546—and counting— reasons there. One more: PUP will be celebrating with a series of posts from some of our most fascinating math authors, so check this space tomorrow for the first, on ciphers, by Craig Bauer. Global Math Week provides a purposeful opportunity to have a global math conversation with your friends, colleagues, students, and family.

Mathematics is for everyone, as evidenced in the launch of Exploding Dots, which James Tanton brilliantly demonstrates at the link above. It is a mathematical story that looks at math in a new way, from grade school arithmetic, all the way to infinite sums and on to unsolved problems that are still stumping our brightest mathematicians. Best of all, you can ace this and no longer say “math is hard”, “math is boring”, or “I hate math”.

Vickie Kearn visits the Great Wall during her trip to our new office in Beijing

I personally started celebrating early as I traveled to Beijing in August to attend the Beijing International Book Fair. I met with the mathematics editors at a dozen different publishers to discuss Chinese editions of our math books. Although we did not speak the same language, we had no trouble communicating. We all knew what a differential equation is and a picture in a book of a driverless car caused lots of hand clapping. I was thrilled to be presented with the first Chinese editions of two books written by Elias Stein (Real Analysis and Complex Analysis) from the editor at China Machine Press. Although I love getting announcements from our rights department that one of our math books is being translated into Chinese, Japanese, German, French, etc., there is nothing like the thrill I had of meeting the people who love math as much as I do and who actually make our books come to life for people all over the world.

Because Princeton University Press now has offices in Oxford and Beijing, in addition to Princeton, and because I go to many conferences each year, I am fortunate to travel internationally and experience global math firsthand. No matter where you live, it is possible to share experiences through doing math. I urge you to visit the Global Math Project website and learn how to do math(s) in a global way.

Check back tomorrow for the start of our PUP blog series on what doing math globally means to our authors. Find someone who says they don’t like math and tell them your global math story.