Vickie Kearn kicks off Global Math Week

October 10 – 17 marks the first ever Global Math Week. This is exciting for many reasons and if you go to the official website, you’ll find that there are already 736,546—and counting— reasons there. One more: PUP will be celebrating with a series of posts from some of our most fascinating math authors, so check this space tomorrow for the first, on ciphers, by Craig Bauer. Global Math Week provides a purposeful opportunity to have a global math conversation with your friends, colleagues, students, and family.

Mathematics is for everyone, as evidenced in the launch of Exploding Dots, which James Tanton brilliantly demonstrates at the link above. It is a mathematical story that looks at math in a new way, from grade school arithmetic, all the way to infinite sums and on to unsolved problems that are still stumping our brightest mathematicians. Best of all, you can ace this and no longer say “math is hard”, “math is boring”, or “I hate math”.

Vickie Kearn visits the Great Wall during her trip to our new office in Beijing

I personally started celebrating early as I traveled to Beijing in August to attend the Beijing International Book Fair. I met with the mathematics editors at a dozen different publishers to discuss Chinese editions of our math books. Although we did not speak the same language, we had no trouble communicating. We all knew what a differential equation is and a picture in a book of a driverless car caused lots of hand clapping. I was thrilled to be presented with the first Chinese editions of two books written by Elias Stein (Real Analysis and Complex Analysis) from the editor at China Machine Press. Although I love getting announcements from our rights department that one of our math books is being translated into Chinese, Japanese, German, French, etc., there is nothing like the thrill I had of meeting the people who love math as much as I do and who actually make our books come to life for people all over the world.

Because Princeton University Press now has offices in Oxford and Beijing, in addition to Princeton, and because I go to many conferences each year, I am fortunate to travel internationally and experience global math firsthand. No matter where you live, it is possible to share experiences through doing math. I urge you to visit the Global Math Project website and learn how to do math(s) in a global way.

Check back tomorrow for the start of our PUP blog series on what doing math globally means to our authors. Find someone who says they don’t like math and tell them your global math story.