Ben Peters on Keywords: Digital & Analog

This post appears concurrently at Culture Digitally.

The popular opposition between “analog” and “digital,” to put it in a nutshell, is wrong.

Two essays in the Digital Keywords volume—Jonathan Sterne’s “Analog” and my own “Digital”—frame this fundamental point: the analog and the digital are not a pair (itself a rehearsal of that tired digital binary, 0 and 1). Nor are they necessarily separate. Neither mutually exclusive nor embedded, digital and analog techniques should be understood by and independent of their fundamental non-relation. The digital is no simple realm of artificial and discrete symbols nor is the analog everything made of natural and continuous real waves, and certainly is the analog no opposite of digital. For Sterne, the analog is both narrower than we thought, compatible with, and subsequent to the digital. For me, the digital has roots in the extension of human hands.

When we talk about the digital, the analog, or other technical processes, are we sure we know what we are talking about? What, if anything, might these two essays have to offer the conversation?

Peters: Digital

Sterne: Analog

This comment may have been adapted from the introduction to Benjamin Peters’ Digital Keywords: A Vocabulary of Information Society and Culture. 25% discount code in 2016: P06197

Peters

Announcing Digital Keywords (at a discount) and a Call for More Keywords at #dkw

This post appears concurrently at Culture Digitally.

I’m thrilled to announce the official publication, by Princeton University Press, of Digital Keywords: A Vocabulary of Information Society and Culture — on the fortieth anniversary of the publication of Raymond Williams’ classic Keywords: A Vocabulary of Culture and Society.

Princeton University Press is offering a discount of 25% on the book to all Culture Digitally readers. Enter the discount code P06197 at any time, until December 31, 2016.

Check out the table of contents, featuring 25 essays from a great group of scholars, or join the Twitter-verse fun at #dkw:

Also, consider indulging in three minutes with the editor Benjamin Peters (me).

The book offers an immensely teachable collection of 25 short essays from leading scholars, set to change the conversation about our contemporary information society and culture. It also represents a conversation begun two years ago with the readers of Culture Digitally and continued thanks to the support of Fred Appel at Princeton University Press. I would like to continue that conversation today.

The volume covers just 25 terms that the contributors felt were important to contemporary scholarly thinking around the information age. So many more terms warrant similar attention. What are some of the other words you think are key to understanding the modern world and its media, and why? Help out now by tweeting your own keyword of interest with the hashtag #dkw.

(If you do not tweet, your welcome to submit your keywords suggestions into this Google form. If you’d like others to be able to follow up with you, please add your name and institutional affiliation; please do not include bot-readable email addresses, since the file will be public.)

Next week, a list of candidate digital keywords will be drawn from the #dkw Twitter hashtag and the Google form, and then posted to Culture Digitally as a public reference and basis for future work. This open resource will also feature a list of the keywords we arrived at well as more than 200 candidate keywords we listed in the Digital Keywords appendix. The resource is intended as a first step toward building a rolling Rolodex of keywords and their scholars and students. The hope is that this exercise will stimulate future Digital Keywords volumes, teaching, and conversations.

Please come join the conversation in print and online, stay tuned as sample keyword essays follow this month, and enjoy!

In Celebration of Mathematicians

This week San Diego, California is home to the largest mathematics meeting in the world. Hosted by the Mathematical Association of America (MAA) and the American Mathematical Society (AMS), the 2013 Joint Mathematics Meeting is more than just panels and presentations—it is a mass gathering of people who are passionate about mathematics.

Mathematicians come from diverse backgrounds, maintain varying interests, and have their own unique journeys. In Fascinating Mathematical People: Interviews and Memoirs, Fern Hunt describes what it was like to be among the first black women to earn a PhD in mathematics, Harold Bacon makes trips to Alcatraz to help a prisoner learn calculus, and Thomas Banchoff, who first became interested in the fourth dimension while reading a Captain Marvel comic, relates his fascinating friendship with Salvador Dalí and their shared passion for art, mathematics, and the profound connection between the two. But whether they view mathematics as reason, art, or something else, all mathematicians are in search of truth.

This week is not only an endeavor in furthering the pursuit of knowledge, but a celebration of the gifted mathematical intellectuals who shape society, culture, and our awareness and understanding of ourselves and the world in which we live. Browse our website or latest mathematics catalog to see more by and about mathematicians, such as Paul J. Nahin’s The Logician and the Engineer: How George Boole and Claude Shannon Created the Information Age. If you’re at the Joint Mathematics Meeting, you may even visit us at booth 311. As Underwood Dudley wrote in “What Is Mathematics For?” included in The Best Writing on Mathematics: 2011 (The Best Writing on Mathematics: 2012 also available.), “What mathematics education is for is not for jobs. It is to teach the race to reason,” and we’ve all got room to learn.