PUP News of the World — July 7, 2014

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Each week we post a round-up of some of our most exciting national and international PUP book coverage. Reviews, interviews, events, articles–this is the spot for coverage of all things “PUP books” that took place in the last week. Enjoy!


now 7.7

THERE GOES THE GAYBORHOOD?

Are gayborhoods an endangered species? So begins the recent Gay City News op-ed written by Princeton University Press author Amin Ghaziani. The piece coincided with this summer’s pride marches across the United States. Gay neighborhoods, like the legendary Castro District in San Francisco and New York’s Greenwich Village, have long provided sexual minorities with safe havens in an often unsafe world. Ghaziani writes:

There are numerous benefits that gay districts, and perhaps only gay districts, provide. It is in these spaces that LGBT people create unique ways of life and expressions of community like annual Pride parades; articulate a distinct political voice; gestate organizations and businesses from bars and bookstores to community centers and nonprofits; find each other for friendship and fellowship; nurture our families (same-sex couples with children tend to live in similar areas of the city); and feel an incomparable sense of safety from hate crimes, discrimination, bigotry, and bias.

Check out the full piece on the Gay City News website.

Amin Ghaziani’s forthcoming book, There Goes the Gayborhood?, was featured in a book roundup “Pride reading list: LGBTrue stories” in the Bay Area Reporter. Ghaziani provides an incisive look at the origins of gayborhoods, the reasons why they are changing today, and their prospects for the future. Drawing on a wealth of evidence–including census data, opinion polls, hundreds of newspaper reports from across the United States, and more than one hundred original interviews with residents in Chicago, one of the most paradigmatic cities in America–There Goes the Gayborhood? argues that political gains and societal acceptance are allowing gays and lesbians to imagine expansive possibilities for a life beyond the gayborhood. The dawn of a new post-gay era is altering the character and composition of existing enclaves across the country, but the spirit of integration can coexist alongside the celebration of differences in subtle and sometimes surprising ways.

Read the introduction of There Goes the Gayborhood? here.

THE BUTTERFLY DEFECT

Globalization has changed the modern world, allowing people to escape poverty and get access to better healthcare. However, PUP authors Ian Goldin and Mike Mariathasan argue that globalization has also increased systemic risks, as the repercussions of local events now cascade over national borders and the fallout of financial meltdowns and environmental disasters affects everyone. Their new book, The Butterfly Defect, addresses the widening gap between systemic risks and their effective management. It shows how the new dynamics of turbo-charged globalization has the potential and power to destabilize our societies. Drawing on the latest insights from a wide variety of disciplines, Ian Goldin and Mike Mariathasan provide practical guidance for how governments, businesses, and individuals can better manage risk in our contemporary world.

Mariathasan wrote a piece for the London School of Economics blog entitled “To preserve the benefits from globalization, global connectivity requires global coordination.” He writes:

We have built globalization on a variety of complex and interconnected networks, without which many of the vital functions of our societies can no longer be provided. The speed with which technological progress and innovation have allowed these networks to grow since the turn of the century has outpaced the institutional structures that support them. The governance regimes available for many of the aforementioned global networks are less sophisticated than that of finance, and the structures available to respond to risks cascading across domains are even more limited.

Visit the LSE blog to view the entire piece, including the authors’ six guiding principles for global governance, and check out the book trailer below.

You can preview the introduction to The Butterfly Defect here.

LIBERALISM

Is liberalism dead? PUP author and former editor for the Economist Edmund Fawcett says no. In a recent piece entitled “Reclaiming Liberalism,” Fawcett addresses the current problems facing the ideology today. Fawcett writes:

Liberals are living in alarming times. A few years before his death in 2012, the British historian Eric Hobsbawm passed summary judgment on the future of liberal democracy. ‘None of the major problems facing humanity in the 21st century can be solved,’ he wrote in the British magazine Prospect, ‘by the principles that still dominate the developed countries of the West: unlimited economic growth and technical progress, the ideal of individual autonomy, freedom of choice, electoral democracy.’ Hobsbawm did not say which were more at fault: liberal aims or liberal capacities. It hardly mattered. His prophetic voice seemed to echo the gathering fears of liberals themselves that perhaps their day was done.

More is in play here than an irrational loss of nerve. Much of what has shaken liberal self-belief since the 1990s is real enough and well-attested: external shocks from violent Islamism; injury to liberal values done by espionage, war-making and torture; a global banking collapse with its costly rescues and enduring economic harm.

Fawcett goes on to argue that the ideals of liberalism are still important but that liberalism must change radically if it is to survive in the future. View the entire piece in Aeon Magazine.

Check out the introduction of Fawcett’s new book, Liberalism: The Life of an Idea. In this engrossing history of liberalism–the first in English for many decades–Fawcett traces the ideals, successes, and failures of this central political tradition through the lives and ideas of a rich cast of European and American thinkers and politicians, from the early nineteenth century to today. Using a broad idea of liberalism, the book discusses celebrated thinkers from Constant and Mill to Berlin, Hayek, and Rawls, as well as more neglected figures. Its twentieth-century politicians include Franklin D. Roosevelt, Lyndon Johnson, and Willy Brandt, but also Hoover, Reagan, and Kohl. The story tracks political liberalism from its beginnings in the 1830s to its long, grudging compromise with democracy, through a golden age after 1945 to the present mood of challenge and doubt.

Fawcett was recently interviewed on BBC Radio’s Free Thinking. Hear more from him in the video below, as he discusses Liberalism:

Ian Goldin explains “The Butterfly Defect”

Ian Goldin is director of the Oxford Martin School and professor of globalization and development at the University of Oxford. He has served as vice president of the World Bank and an advisor to President Nelson Mandela. His many books include Divided Nations, Globalization for Development, and Exceptional People (Princeton). His most recent book is The Butterfly Defect: How Globalization Creates Systemic Risks, and What to Do about It, co-authored with Mike Mariathasan, which you can sample for free here [PDF].

 

bookjacket The Butterfly Defect
How Globalization Creates Systemic Risks, and What to Do about It
Ian Goldin & Mike Mariathasan

Ian Goldin, former VP of the World Bank, on Blog Talk Radio

Exceptional People, a new book by Ian Goldin, Geoffrey Cameron, and Meera Balarajan, puts migration in a deep historical context–some 50,000 years of it.  This topic isn’t going away any time soon, not with election season just around the corner, so this is one to keep an eye on.

By bringing a whole new set of evidence to the raging debate,  Goldin argues that migration is not simply a problem to be fixed but rather a process to be managed and coordinating that management is the challenge currently facing the U.S.  Exceptional People will be published on June 1 and to kick off his U.S. media tour, Ian Goldin was interviewed by “Patriot Games” for BlogTalkRadio.