Bird Fact Friday – Evolution

From page 14 of Better Birding:

Birds, like all animals, have evolved to take the best advantage of their environment. For example, the Northern Harrier glide and swoops low over fields and marshes, periodically flapping and hovering because that enables it to see the small rodents it preys on. Birds like wrens and rails are dark in plumage because they are most often found in dense habitats, the better to blend in with shadows. Species that make their home in the desert are often paler. The intuitive birder keeps these things in mind when looking for a specific species of bird out in the field.

Better Birding: Tips, Tools & Concepts for the Field
George L. Armistead and Brian L. Sullivan

Better BirdingBetter Birding reveals the techniques expert birders use to identify a wide array of bird species in the field—quickly and easily. Featuring hundreds of stunning photos and composite plates throughout, this book simplifies identification by organizing the birds you see into groupings and offering strategies specifically tailored to each group. Skill building focuses not just on traditional elements such as plumage, but also on creating a context around each bird, including habitat, behavior, and taxonomy—parts so integral to every bird’s identity but often glossed over by typical field guides. Critical background information is provided for each group, enabling you to approach bird identification with a wide-angle view, using your eyes, brain, and binoculars more strategically, resulting in a more organized approach to learning birds.

Bird Fact Friday – How to find Trumpeter Swans during breeding season

From page 289 of Waterfowl of North America, Europe & Asia:

Trumpeter Swans prefer freshwater wetlands for breeding, which usually occurs between mid-May and late June. They typically choose habitats that include lakes and shallow ponds that are large enough for take off, with plenty of submerged vegetation and water that is neither too acidic nor eutrophic.

Waterfowl of North America, Europe & Asia: An Identification Guide
Sébastien Reeber

WaterfowlThis is the ultimate guide for anyone who wants to identify the ducks, geese, and swans of North America, Europe, and Asia. With 72 stunning color plates (that include more than 920 drawings), over 650 superb photos, and in-depth descriptions, this book brings together the most current information on 84 species of Eurasian and North American waterfowl, and on more than 100 hybrids. The guide delves into taxonomy, identification features, determination of age and sex, geographic variations, measurements, voice, molt, and hybridization. In addition, the status of each species is treated with up-to-date details on distribution, population size, habitats, and life cycle. Color plates and photos are accompanied by informative captions and 85 distribution maps are also provided. Taken together, this is an unrivaled, must-have reference for any birder with an interest in the world’s waterfowl.

• A guide to the 84 species of ducks, geese, and swans of Europe, Asia, and North America
• 72 color plates with more than 920 illustrations of most plumages and subspecies, both in flight and standing
• More than 650 color photos
• Details on taxonomy, identification features, determination of age and sex, geographic variations, measurements, voice, molt, hybridization, habitat and life cycle, range and populations, and status in captivity
• 85 distribution maps
• Descriptions and illustrations of more than 100 hybrids regularly encountered in the wild

Bird Fact Friday – Incredible diversity in southern Africa

From page 10 of Birds of Southern Africa:

More birds breed in southern Africa than in the U.S. and Canada combined. There are approximately 950 different species of birds in the region, of which about 140 are endemic or near endemic. One of the reasons for this is the climatic and topographical diversity of the region. The climate ranges from cool-temperate in the southwest to hot and tropical in the north. The southwest of the region experiences a winter rainfall regime, the north and east have summer rains, and some of the central parts have aseasonal rainfall. Additionally, rainfall increases from west to east. Winter snows are regular on the higher mountains, which rise to 3,500 meters above sea level.

Birds of Southern Africa
Ian Sinclair, Phil Hockey, Warwick Tarboton & Peter Ryan

BirdsBirds of Southern Africa continues to be the best and most authoritative guide to the bird species of this remarkable region. This fully revised edition covers all birds found in South Africa, Lesotho, Swaziland, Namibia, Botswana, Zimbabwe, and southern Mozambique. The 213 dazzling color plates depict more than 950 species and are accompanied by more than 950 color maps and detailed facing text.

This edition includes new identification information on behavior and habitat, updated taxonomy, additional artwork, improved raptor and wader plates with flight images for each species, up-to-date distribution maps reflecting resident and migrant species, and calendar bars indicating occurrence throughout the year and breeding months.

• Fully updated and revised
• 213 color plates featuring more than 950 species
• 950+ color maps and over 380 new improved illustrations
• Up-to-date distribution maps show the relative abundance of a species in the region and indicate resident or migrant status
• New identification information on behavior and habitat
• Taxonomy includes relevant species lumps and splits
• Raptor and wader plates with flight images for each species
• Calendar bars indicate occurrence throughout the year and breeding months.

For a limited time, get 30% off on this title!


Two for Tuesday – Britain’s Freshwater Fishes & England’s Rare Mosses

From our WildGuides selection, we are introducing two new beautifully illustrated books for your personal library.

j9973Britain’s Freshwater Fishes
by Mark Everard

Britain hosts a diversity of freshwater environments, from torrential hill streams and lowland rivers to lakes, reservoirs, ponds, canals, ditches, and upper reaches of estuaries. Britain’s Freshwater Fishes covers the 53 species of freshwater and brackish water fishes that are native or have been introduced and become naturalized. This beautifully illustrated guide features high-quality in-the-water or on-the-bank photographs throughout. Detailed species accounts describe the key identification features and provide information on status, size and weight, habitat, ecology, and conservation. Written in an accessible style, the book also contains introductory sections on fish biology, fish habitats, how to identify fishes, and conservation and legislation.




j9975England’s Rare Mosses and Liverworts:
Their History, Ecology, and Conservation
by Ron D. Porley

This is the first book to cover England’s rare and threatened mosses and liverworts, collectively known as bryophytes. As a group, they are the most ancient land plants and occupy a unique position in the colonization of the Earth by plant life. However, many are at risk from habitat loss, pollution, climate change, and other factors. Britain is one of the world’s best bryologically recorded areas, yet its mosses and liverworts are not well known outside a small band of experts. This has meant that conservation action has tended to lag behind that of more charismatic groups such as birds and mammals. Of the 918 different types of bryophyte in England, 87 are on the British Red List and are regarded as threatened under the strict criteria of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature.

This book aims to raise awareness by providing stunning photographs–many never before published–of each threatened species, as well as up-to-date profiles of 84 of them, including status, distribution, history, and conservation measures. The book looks at what bryophytes are, why they are important and useful, and what makes them rare; it also examines threats, extinctions, ex situ conservation techniques, legislation, and the impact of the 1992 Convention on Biological Diversity.

For more selections from WildGuides, please visit: