Two for Tuesday – Political Bubbles and Champagne Bubbles

bubblesFrom financial and political bubbles to bubbles that tickle your senses, we have you covered with two books just published. We invite you to read their Introductions online.

Political Bubbles: Financial Crises and the Failure of American Democracy
by Nolan McCarty, Keith T. Poole & Howard Rosenthal

Behind every financial crisis lurks a “political bubble”–policy biases that foster market behaviors leading to financial instability. Rather than tilting against risky behavior, political bubbles–arising from a potent combination of beliefs, institutions, and interests–aid, abet, and amplify risk. Demonstrating how political bubbles helped create the real estate-generated financial bubble and the 2008 financial crisis, this book argues that similar government oversights in the aftermath of the crisis undermined Washington’s response to the “popped” financial bubble, and shows how such patterns have occurred repeatedly throughout US history. The first full accounting of how politics produces financial ruptures, Political Bubbles offers timely lessons that all sectors would do well to heed.

Nolan McCarty is the Susan Dod Brown Professor of Politics and Public Affairs and chair of the Department of Politics at Princeton University. Keith T. Poole is the Philip H. Alston Jr. Distinguished Professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Georgia. Howard Rosenthal is professor of politics at New York University and the Roger Williams Straus Professor of Social Sciences, Emeritus, at Princeton University.
Introduction online: http://press.princeton.edu/chapters/i9934.pdf

Uncorked: The Science of Champagne (Revised Edition)
by Gérard Liger-Belair
With a new foreword by Hervé This

Bubbly may tickle the nose, but Uncorked tackles what the nose and the naked eye cannot–the spectacular science that gives champagne its charm and champagne drinkers immeasurable pleasure. Providing an unprecedented close-up view of the beauty in the bubbles, Gérard Liger-Belair presents images that look surprisingly like lovely flowers, geometric patterns, even galaxies as the bubbles rise through the glass and burst forth on the surface. He illustrates how bubbles form not on the glass itself but are “born” out of debris stuck on the glass wall, how they rise, and how they pop. Offering a colorful history of champagne, Liger-Belair tells us how it is made and he asks if global warming could spell champagne’s demise. In a brand new foreword, renowned chemist Hervé This places the evolution of champagne within the context of molecular gastronomy and the science of cuisine, and in an original afterword, Liger-Belair updates the reader on new developments in the world of bubble science and delves even more deeply into the processes that give champagne its unique and beautiful character.

Gérard Liger-Belair is a physics professor at the University of Reims, located in the Champagne region of France.
Introduction online: http://press.princeton.edu/chapters/i9939.pdf