Princeton University Press awarded the Lyman H. Butterfield Award

At the 2017 annual meeting of the Association for Documentary Editing held in Buffalo, New York, Princeton University Press was awarded the Lyman H. Butterfield Award, given annually by the Association since 1985 “to an individual, project, or institution for recent contributions in the areas of documentary publication, teaching, and service.” The award is granted in memoriam of Lyman Butterfield, whose editing career included contributions to The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, the editing of the Adams Family Papers, and publishing The Letters of Benjamin Rush. Princeton University Press is a leader in the field that has embraced the world of digital scholarship while continuing to support book editions.

The award was presented by last year’s winner, Roger Bruns, and accepted on behalf of the Press by Barbara Oberg, General Editor Emerita of The Jefferson Papers. Bruns’ comments follow:

One scholar wrote of the Jefferson edition, “…, the ever-increasing attention over the years to thorough translation of multiple languages and powerful, thoughtfully chosen illustrations make for a stimulating and more comprehensive reading experience. Precision is the hallmark of the Princeton University Press. Quality, durability, and consistency frame the content––matching the degree of adoration that the historical Jefferson himself brought to his books and papers.” The Press has published sixty volumes of the Jefferson Papers in three series and throughout this time its commitment to the best standards has never wavered.

The contributions of Princeton University Press to historical documentary editing go far beyond the Jefferson Papers. The Press published all sixty-nine volumes of The Papers of Woodrow Wilson, edited by Arthur Link. It also published both volumes of the Letters of Benjamin Rush in 1951 and both volumes of the Political Correspondence and Public Papers of Aaron Burr in 1983.

But historical projects are certainly not the only beneficiaries of this commitment to scholarly publishing. Just listen to the some of the multitude of subjects, the unprecedented list of individual whose papers the Press has, with precision and efficiency, published in the last few decades. It has published collected works of Carl Jung, Kierkegaard’s Writings, a critical edition of W. H. Auden, Collected Writings of Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and The Writings of Henry David Thoreau.

It has published the Collected Works of Paul Valery; the Collected Works of Goethe; editions of Erich Neumann and St. John Perse, The Collected Dialogues of Plato, and the Complete Works of Aristotle. I’m surprised that the Press has not published the secret diaries of King Tut.

This record represents a remarkable dedication to a broad and deep presentation of important contributions to literature, classicism, history, poetry, science, and music. When you stop and think about the breadth and amount of scholarship it seems, it is, astonishing.

In addition to this remarkable publishing legacy, the Press also entered into a unique collaboration with Hebrew University of Jerusalem in co-sponsoring a scholarly edition of The Collected Papers of Albert Einstein. The project has published fourteen volumes to date, with each volume appearing first with the documents in their original language and then reissued in English translation.

 

Peter Dougherty, the director of Princeton University Press adds, “For my colleagues at PUP and for the editors of our documentary book projects, we are honored to receive the 2017 Lyman H. Butterfield Award and thrilled that our long-time publishing partner and dear friend Barbara Oberg [has accepted] it for us.

The award is timely because it recognizes Peter’s distinguished leadership of the Press for more than a decade. He is stepping down as director later this year.