Dino Day: Bistahieversor sealeyi

Adapted from page 44:

The Bistahieversor sealeyi lived during the late Upper Cretaceous (Campanian, ca. 78–72.1 Ma) in western Laurasia (present-day New Mexico, USA). It was a sturdy carnivore with an appearance similar to tyrannosaurids, leading it to be known previously as Aublysodon cf. mirandus or Daspletosaurus. At the end of the Cretaceous in western North America (paleocontinent Laramidia), tyrannosauroid derivatives were replaced by tyrannosaurids. In the east (Appalachia), where there was no exchange of fauna with Asia.

From the late Lower Cretaceous (Valanginian, ca. 139.8–132.9 Ma) area of eastern Laurasia (present-day Mongolia). The incomplete remains of a maxillary tooth and a tibia and a fibula that are about 1 m long are attributed to Prodeinodon mongoliensis, although these remains can not be compared with this species.

Dinosaur Facts and Figures: The Theropods and Other Dinosauriformes
By Rubén Molina-Pérez and Asier Larramendi
Illustrations byAndrey Atuchin and Sante Mazzei

The theropod dinosaurs ruled the planet for millions of years, with species ranging from the mighty Tyrannosaurus rex to feathered raptors no bigger than turkeys. Dinosaur Facts and Figures is a stunningly illustrated book of records for these marvelous creatures—such as the biggest, the smallest, and the fastest theropods, as well as the ones with the most powerful bite.

This one-of-a-kind compendium features more than 3,000 records, covers some 750 theropod species, and includes a wealth of illustrations ranging from diagrams and technical drawings to full-color reconstructions of specimens. The book is divided into sections that put numerous amazing theropod facts at your fingertips. “Comparing Species” is organized by taxonomic group and gives comparisons of the size of species, how long ago they lived, and when they were discovered. “Mesozoic Calendar” includes spreads showing the positions of the continents at different geological time periods and reconstructions of creatures from each period. “Prehistoric Puzzle” compares bones, teeth, and feathers while “Theropod Life” uses vivid, user-friendly graphics to answer questions such as which dinosaur was the smartest and which had the most powerful bite. Other sections chart theropod distribution on the contemporary world map, provide comprehensive illustrated listings of footprints, compile the physical specifications of all known theropods and Mesozoic birds, and much more.

  • The essential illustrated record book for anyone interested in dinosaurs
  • Features thousands of records on everything from the smartest and fastest theropods to the largest theropod eggs
  • Includes more than 2,000 diagrams and drawings and more than 300 digital reconstructions
  • Covers more than 750 theropod species, including Mesozoic birds and other dinosauromorphs
  • Provides detailed listings of footprints, biometric specifications, and scholarly and popular references

Dino Day: Giganotosaurus carolinii

Adapted from page 38:

The Giganotosaurus carolinii (“southern giant lizard of Rubén Carolini”)  lived during the late Upper Cretaceous (lower Cenomanian, ca. 100.5–93.9 Ma) in southwestern Gondwana (present-day Argentina). It was one of the largest predators of all time, as long as an urban bus, and weighing as much as an African elephant and a white rhinoceros together. The largest specimen is based on a very incomplete tooth that turns out to be 6.5% larger than that of the MUCPvCh1 type specimen. This individual would be as heavy as the largest specimen of Tyrannosaurus rex. Giganotosaurus was longer than Tyrannosaurus, but its body was less sturdy.

One of the largest theropods that left its imprints was a carcharodontosaurid (this group of dinosaur) from the early Upper Cretaceous of southwestern Gondwana (present day Brazil).

Dinosaur Facts and Figures: The Theropods and Other Dinosauriformes
By Rubén Molina-Pérez and Asier Larramendi
Illustrations byAndrey Atuchin and Sante Mazzei

The theropod dinosaurs ruled the planet for millions of years, with species ranging from the mighty Tyrannosaurus rex to feathered raptors no bigger than turkeys. Dinosaur Facts and Figures is a stunningly illustrated book of records for these marvelous creatures—such as the biggest, the smallest, and the fastest theropods, as well as the ones with the most powerful bite.

This one-of-a-kind compendium features more than 3,000 records, covers some 750 theropod species, and includes a wealth of illustrations ranging from diagrams and technical drawings to full-color reconstructions of specimens. The book is divided into sections that put numerous amazing theropod facts at your fingertips. “Comparing Species” is organized by taxonomic group and gives comparisons of the size of species, how long ago they lived, and when they were discovered. “Mesozoic Calendar” includes spreads showing the positions of the continents at different geological time periods and reconstructions of creatures from each period. “Prehistoric Puzzle” compares bones, teeth, and feathers while “Theropod Life” uses vivid, user-friendly graphics to answer questions such as which dinosaur was the smartest and which had the most powerful bite. Other sections chart theropod distribution on the contemporary world map, provide comprehensive illustrated listings of footprints, compile the physical specifications of all known theropods and Mesozoic birds, and much more.

  • The essential illustrated record book for anyone interested in dinosaurs
  • Features thousands of records on everything from the smartest and fastest theropods to the largest theropod eggs
  • Includes more than 2,000 diagrams and drawings and more than 300 digital reconstructions
  • Covers more than 750 theropod species, including Mesozoic birds and other dinosauromorphs
  • Provides detailed listings of footprints, biometric specifications, and scholarly and popular references

Dino Day: Spinosaurus aegyptiacus

Adapted from page 34:

The Spinosaurus aegyptiacus lived during the early Upper Cretaceous (Cenomanian, ca. 100.5–93.9 Ma) in north-central Gondwana (present-day Algeria, Egypt, and Morocco). It was a gigantic theropod and the longest of them all. It was as long as a bus and car lined up and weighed as much as an African elephant and a hippopotamus together. The traditional appearance of this dinosaur changed due to a new specimen that showed its true proportions: It had very short hind legs and a very long body.

Apparently, there are no differences between the footprints of primitive megalosauroids and those of their direct descendants, the spinosaurids. Nevertheless, the former are exclusively from the Jurassic, while the latter are characteristic of the Cretaceous, and so Chapus, Satapliasauropus, and similar specimens could be footprints of spinosaurids.

Dinosaur Facts and Figures: The Theropods and Other Dinosauriformes
By Rubén Molina-Pérez and Asier Larramendi
Illustrations byAndrey Atuchin and Sante Mazzei

The theropod dinosaurs ruled the planet for millions of years, with species ranging from the mighty Tyrannosaurus rex to feathered raptors no bigger than turkeys. Dinosaur Facts and Figures is a stunningly illustrated book of records for these marvelous creatures—such as the biggest, the smallest, and the fastest theropods, as well as the ones with the most powerful bite.

This one-of-a-kind compendium features more than 3,000 records, covers some 750 theropod species, and includes a wealth of illustrations ranging from diagrams and technical drawings to full-color reconstructions of specimens. The book is divided into sections that put numerous amazing theropod facts at your fingertips. “Comparing Species” is organized by taxonomic group and gives comparisons of the size of species, how long ago they lived, and when they were discovered. “Mesozoic Calendar” includes spreads showing the positions of the continents at different geological time periods and reconstructions of creatures from each period. “Prehistoric Puzzle” compares bones, teeth, and feathers while “Theropod Life” uses vivid, user-friendly graphics to answer questions such as which dinosaur was the smartest and which had the most powerful bite. Other sections chart theropod distribution on the contemporary world map, provide comprehensive illustrated listings of footprints, compile the physical specifications of all known theropods and Mesozoic birds, and much more.

  • The essential illustrated record book for anyone interested in dinosaurs
  • Features thousands of records on everything from the smartest and fastest theropods to the largest theropod eggs
  • Includes more than 2,000 diagrams and drawings and more than 300 digital reconstructions
  • Covers more than 750 theropod species, including Mesozoic birds and other dinosauromorphs
  • Provides detailed listings of footprints, biometric specifications, and scholarly and popular references

Dino Day: Dryptosauroides grandis

Adapted from page 28:

The Dryptosauroides grandis lived in the Upper Cretaceous (upper Maastrichtian, ca. 72.1–66 Ma) of Hindustan (present day India). It was an abelisauroid, as heavy as a hippopotamus and almost as long as a city bus. Due to its light build, it is possible that it captured small prey or took advantage of the carrion abandoned by the dominant hunters of its time, the abelisaurids.

These dinosaurs had an unusual footprint with a very elongated central finger compared to the lateral ones, which were similar to the impressions left by ornithomimosaurs and noasaurids. Both were very fast animals. Because it dates from the Middle Jurassic and lived in northcentral Neopangea (present-day Portugal), it is more likely that it was an abelisauroid.

It has been proposed that some fingerprints with a very developed middle finger could have been made by primitive abelisauroids, such as Deferrariischnium, Sarmientichnus and Zhengichnus.

Dinosaur Facts and Figures: The Theropods and Other Dinosauriformes
By Rubén Molina-Pérez and Asier Larramendi
Illustrations byAndrey Atuchin and Sante Mazzei

The theropod dinosaurs ruled the planet for millions of years, with species ranging from the mighty Tyrannosaurus rex to feathered raptors no bigger than turkeys. Dinosaur Facts and Figures is a stunningly illustrated book of records for these marvelous creatures—such as the biggest, the smallest, and the fastest theropods, as well as the ones with the most powerful bite.

This one-of-a-kind compendium features more than 3,000 records, covers some 750 theropod species, and includes a wealth of illustrations ranging from diagrams and technical drawings to full-color reconstructions of specimens. The book is divided into sections that put numerous amazing theropod facts at your fingertips. “Comparing Species” is organized by taxonomic group and gives comparisons of the size of species, how long ago they lived, and when they were discovered. “Mesozoic Calendar” includes spreads showing the positions of the continents at different geological time periods and reconstructions of creatures from each period. “Prehistoric Puzzle” compares bones, teeth, and feathers while “Theropod Life” uses vivid, user-friendly graphics to answer questions such as which dinosaur was the smartest and which had the most powerful bite. Other sections chart theropod distribution on the contemporary world map, provide comprehensive illustrated listings of footprints, compile the physical specifications of all known theropods and Mesozoic birds, and much more.

  • The essential illustrated record book for anyone interested in dinosaurs
  • Features thousands of records on everything from the smartest and fastest theropods to the largest theropod eggs
  • Includes more than 2,000 diagrams and drawings and more than 300 digital reconstructions
  • Covers more than 750 theropod species, including Mesozoic birds and other dinosauromorphs
  • Provides detailed listings of footprints, biometric specifications, and scholarly and popular references

Dino Day: Sinosaurus shawanensis

All summer long, we’ll be highlighting different theropods from Dinosaur Facts and Figures: The Theropods and Other Dinosauriformes by Rubén Molina-Pérez and Asier Larramendi (with illustrations byAndrey Atuchin and Sante Mazzei).

This week’s entry is adapted from page 22:

A large vertebra from the Lower Jurassic (Hettangian, ca. 201.3–199.3 Ma) of northeastern Pangea (present-day China) was found among remains of sauropodomorphs and other mixed theropods. It may belong to a large specimen of “Dilophosaurussinensis, weighing more than a current hippopotamus. It was a dangerous predator, as it was not only big for its time but also quite agile, due to its slender build. The name “Sinosaurus shawanensis” appears on a list of fauna somewhere but was not formally named.

The longest theropod footprint from the Lower Jurassic may have been made by a species similar to Sinosaurus. It is different from the asymmetrical imprints left by megalosauroids. It was found in north-central Pangea (present-day Poland).

The smallest footprint of the Lower Jurassic belongs to a young coelophysid named the Grallator that lived in northwestern Pangea (present-day New Jersey).

Dinosaur Facts and Figures: The Theropods and Other Dinosauriformes
By Rubén Molina-Pérez and Asier Larramendi
Illustrations byAndrey Atuchin and Sante Mazzei

The theropod dinosaurs ruled the planet for millions of years, with species ranging from the mighty Tyrannosaurus rex to feathered raptors no bigger than turkeys. Dinosaur Facts and Figures is a stunningly illustrated book of records for these marvelous creatures—such as the biggest, the smallest, and the fastest theropods, as well as the ones with the most powerful bite.

This one-of-a-kind compendium features more than 3,000 records, covers some 750 theropod species, and includes a wealth of illustrations ranging from diagrams and technical drawings to full-color reconstructions of specimens. The book is divided into sections that put numerous amazing theropod facts at your fingertips. “Comparing Species” is organized by taxonomic group and gives comparisons of the size of species, how long ago they lived, and when they were discovered. “Mesozoic Calendar” includes spreads showing the positions of the continents at different geological time periods and reconstructions of creatures from each period. “Prehistoric Puzzle” compares bones, teeth, and feathers while “Theropod Life” uses vivid, user-friendly graphics to answer questions such as which dinosaur was the smartest and which had the most powerful bite. Other sections chart theropod distribution on the contemporary world map, provide comprehensive illustrated listings of footprints, compile the physical specifications of all known theropods and Mesozoic birds, and much more.

  • The essential illustrated record book for anyone interested in dinosaurs
  • Features thousands of records on everything from the smartest and fastest theropods to the largest theropod eggs
  • Includes more than 2,000 diagrams and drawings and more than 300 digital reconstructions
  • Covers more than 750 theropod species, including Mesozoic birds and other dinosauromorphs
  • Provides detailed listings of footprints, biometric specifications, and scholarly and popular references

Exclusive Sampler from Pterosaurs by Mark P. Witton

We highly recommend downloading or opening the source PDF for the sampler, available here: http://blog.press.princeton.edu/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/PterosaursSampler.pdf

The embedded PDF below does not properly display the beauty of the cover, but you can still get a sense of the awesome content of the book. Happy Reading!

Want to learn more about this book? Check it out here: http://press.princeton.edu/titles/9967.html

Mark Witton explains exactly what is in his new book, Pterosaurs

Pterosaurs is meant to provide an interesting read for researchers and diehard enthusiasts, while still being approachable for those who are yet to really acquaint themselves with flying reptiles. If you’re familiar with the Unwin and Wellnhofer books, you know the tone I’ve aimed for. (Those interested in reading a sample of the text will want to download the first chapter from Princeton University Press, and check out an early draft [essentially unchanged in the published text] of Chapter 17.) Pterosaurs is, of course, more up to date than either of these books. Only seven years passing between this book and the last, but the differences are quite pronounced. Despite both Unwin’s and Wellnhofer’s books dating very well, whole groups of pterosaurs have been discovered since their publications (e.g. ‘boreopterids’, chaoyangopterids, wukongopterids, and many more in the case of Wellnhofer’s tome) and ideas of pterosaur lifestyles and habits have changed considerably. It’s of small significance in this field of three modern pterosaur books but, by default, Pterosaurs is the most up to date synthesis on these animals currently available.

Thalassodromeus sethi, a pterosaur with a most unfortunate name, showing a baby Brazilian spinosaur that the food chain works both ways. One of my favourite paintings from Witton (2013).

Pterosaurs is meant to combine the best aspects of preceding pterosaur books into one package, putting Unwin’s terrific introduction to the group together with Wellnhofer’s coverage of all pterosaur species and important fossils. This results in nine chapters covering the broad-strokes of pterosaur research: the history of their discovery, evolutionary origins, osteology, soft-tissues, locomotion (flight and terrestrial locomotion are discussed separately), palaeoecology and extinction. The other 16 chapters focus on specific pterosaur groups, each featuring a history of discovery, distribution maps, overviews of anatomy (including soft-tissues, where known) and discussions of palaeoecology. These latter chapters broadly follow the phylogenetic scheme of Lü et al. (2010) but, because that will not please everyone, alternative taxonomic proposals are mentioned and discussed where relevant (though hopefully not at expense of readability!). Attempts to present different sides to contentious issues are continual throughout the book. As readers will discover, there is still a lot to learn about these animals and it would be foolish to present only a single view as ‘right’ when pterosaur science continues to evolve and change. The drive to give everyone fair hearing resulted in a reference list of over 500 works and, hopefully, this will make the book a useful starting point for students new to pterosaurs and wanting to hit the primary literature. (Incidentally, Lü Junchang needs to take a bow as probably the most prolific modern pterosaur worker, his portion of the citation list dwarfing virtually everyone else’s despite only beginning in the mid-nineties. Way to go, JC!)

 

Read the complete post over at Mark’s blog: http://markwitton-com.blogspot.co.uk/2013/06/pterosaurs-natural-history-evolution.html

 

 

bookjacket

Pterosaurs
Natural History, Evolution, Anatomy
Mark P. Witton