News of the World, March 14, 2014

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Each week we post a round-up of some of our most exciting national and international PUP book coverage. Reviews, interviews, events, articles–this is the spot for coverage of all things “PUP books” that took place in the last week. Enjoy!


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Wishing that you had a retro selfie like Colin Powell? We can relate. But what about the motivation behind acts of vanity like selfies? Are narcissism and vanity really as bad as they seem? Can we avoid them even if we try? In Mirror, Mirror, Simon Blackburn, the author of such best-selling philosophy books as Think, Being Good, and Lust, says that narcissism, vanity, pride, and self-esteem are more complex than they first appear and have innumerable good and bad forms. Drawing on philosophy, psychology, literature, history, and popular culture, Blackburn offers an enlightening and entertaining exploration of self-love, from the myth of Narcissus and the Christian story of the Fall to today’s self-esteem industry.

Mirror, Mirror was named as the book of the week in the Times Higher Education:

“Blackburn is not just a sure and supremely knowledgeable narrator in whom we can have utmost confidence, but one with a quirky ear, alert to the curious side note and irrefutable detail that can make his sometimes dusty discipline gleam with a new sheen and edge.” — Shahidha Bari, Times Higher Education

Read the introduction of Mirror, Mirror here.


The weekend is the perfect time to break out those oven mitts, and luckily, we have inspiration for your upcoming kitchen session. When Merry White’s Cooking for Crowds was first published in 1974, home cooks in America were just waking up to the great foods the rest of the world was eating, from pesto and curries to Ukrainian pork and baklava. Now Merry White’s indispensable classic is back in print for a new generation of readers to savor, and her international recipes are as crowd-pleasing as ever–whether you are hosting a large party numbering in the dozens, or a more intimate gathering of family and friends.

In this delightful cookbook, White shares all the ingenious tricks she learned as a young Harvard graduate student earning her way through school as a caterer to European scholars, heads of state, and cosmopolitans like Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis. With the help of her friend Julia Child, the cook just down the block in Cambridge, White surmounted unforeseen obstacles and epic-sized crises in the kitchen, along the way developing the surefire strategies described here.

Check out this recent BBC highlight about how Julia Child helped Merry White to remedy a burnt dish. You can also view an interview with Merry White on Midweek.

 

Ready to try your hand at a recipe? Try this sample recipe for tabbouleh and comment below with which recipe from the book you plan to try.


Good things come in small packages. Next up on our list is Diane Coyle’s new book, GDP: A Brief but Affectionate History. This book traces the history of this artificial, abstract, complex, but exceedingly important statistic from its eighteenth- and nineteenth-century precursors through its invention in the 1940s and its postwar golden age, and then through the Great Crash up to today. The reader learns why this standard measure of the size of a country’s economy was invented, how it has changed over the decades, and what its strengths and weaknesses are.

The book explains why even small changes in GDP can decide elections, influence major political decisions, and determine whether countries can keep borrowing or be thrown into recession. The book ends by making the case that GDP was a good measure for the twentieth century but is increasingly inappropriate for a twenty-first-century economy driven by innovation, services, and intangible goods.

 

“[A] little charmer of a book…GDP: A Brief but Affectionate History is just what the title promises….Cowperthwaite himself would nod in agreement over Ms. Coyle’s informed discussion of what the GDP misses and how it misfires…Ms. Coyle—a graceful and witty writer, by the way—recounts familiar problems and adds some new ones….[E]xcellent”—James Grant

 


How are you handling the stress? The stress of making your March Madness brackets, of course. Unsure of where to start? Is this the year you will finally use something other than jersey color to make your bracket? PUP author Tim Chartier has your answers. He was featured this week on Bloomberg’s website, and he spoke about his strategy for creating a bracket that places him in the 97th percentile of brackets submitted to ESPN.

Ready to go in on Warren Buffet’s $1 Billion basketball challenge? We want Professor Chartier on our team. In the meantime, check out his new book, Math Bytes. This book provides a fun, hands-on approach to learning how mathematics and computing relate to the world around us and help us to better understand it. How can reposting on Twitter kill a movie’s opening weekend? How can you use mathematics to find your celebrity look-alike? What is Homer Simpson’s method for disproving Fermat’s Last Theorem?

Each topic in this refreshingly inviting book illustrates a famous mathematical algorithm or result–such as Google’s PageRank and the traveling salesman problem–and the applications grow more challenging as you progress through the chapters. But don’t worry, helpful solutions are provided each step of the way. Math Bytes shows you how to do calculus using a bag of chocolate chips, and how to prove the Euler characteristic simply by doodling. Generously illustrated in color throughout, this lively and entertaining book also explains how to create fractal landscapes with a roll of the dice, pick a competitive bracket for March Madness, decipher the math that makes it possible to resize a computer font or launch an Angry Bird–and much, much more. All of the applications are presented in an accessible and engaging way, enabling beginners and advanced readers alike to learn and explore at their own pace–a bit and a byte at a time.

 

The Dinner Party Is Back!

What does cooking for crowds look like?

Last week, Merry “Corky” White assembled a dream team of friends, family, and Boston area chefs to celebrate the publication of Cooking for Crowds: 40th Anniversary Edition. The chefs each offered up their own twist on one of the recipes from the book and as you’ll see in the video below, everyone had a fantastic time. Does this make you want to grab a copy of Corky’s cookbook and host your own festive gathering? Here’s a Baklava recipe to get you started.

 

Thank you to Cat who taped this video and gave permission for us to use it here.

Warm up with Lentil Soup with Mettwurst from Cooking for Crowds

Plummeting temperatures means hot soup for dinner, so I wanted to share this delicious recipe for Lentil Soup with Mettwurst from Cooking for Crowds: 40th Anniversary Edition by Merry White. The image is taken directly from the book so you can see the layout and cute Edward Koren illustration that accompanies the recipe in print, but a text version is below, too, in case you need it.

Also, you might enjoy this interview Merry gave over the winter break.

soup

 

Lentil Soup with Mettwurst

A rich and filling soup, with which you will need only bread, salad, and dessert to make a good lunch or supper. Try it with other sausages or cooking salamis, too. Any uncooked (but smoked) fine-grained sausage may be substituted.

6 12 20 50
dried green lentils 1 c 2 c 3 ½ c 7 c
butter 2 tbs 4 tbs 7 tbs 2 sticks
large onion, finely chopped 1 2 3 ½ 8
celery stalks, finely chopped 1 2 3 8
carrots, peeled and thinly sliced 2 4 7 14
bay leaves 1 2 3 5
thyme Pinch ½ tsp 1 tsp 2 ½ tsp
bouillon, or rich chicken stock 1 qt 2 qts 3 ½ qts 7 qts
mettwurst ½ lb 1 lb 2 lbs 4 lbs
salt & pepper (to taste)

Soak the lentils in water to cover overnight.

The next day, drain the lentils well. Melt the butter in a large saucepan and add the chopped onion, celery, and carrots, then the bay leaves and thyme. Let simmer, covered, for about 15 minutes. Add the bouillon or stock, lentils, and sausage and cook at a gentle simmer for about 2 hours, or until the lentils are tender.

Remove the sausage and set aside. Put the soup in a blender in small batches and blend until smooth. Leave about one-quarter of the soup unblended and add to the smooth soup for “texture.”

Slice the reserved sausage and add to the soup with salt and pepper to taste.

NOTE: The soup can be reheated, but more stock or water will be needed because lentils thicken as they stand. It can also be kept in a cool place, unrefrigerated.

PUP News of the World

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Welcome to the next edition of our brand new series, PUP News of the World! Every week we will be posting a round-up of all of our most exciting national and international PUP book coverage. Reviews, interviews, events, articles–this is the spot for coverage of all things “PUP books” that took place in the last week. Enjoy!


THE BEST OF THE BEST

As we near the end of 2013–where did the year go?–we’ve entered the season of “Best of” lists. Princeton University Press is excited to highlight just some of the most recent titles that have been featured as the best of the past year.

Anat Admati & Martin Hellwig start it off as THE BANKERS’ NEW CLOTHES is included in The WSJ Best Nonfiction of 2013″ roundup. What separates this title from the pack? “In a year of important books about the recent economic crisis, the most important one told us simply how to stop the next one,” says the WSJ. Interested in learning more? Check out chapter one.

Mike Tyson, whose new book was released earlier this fall, pointed to a PUP book as one of his favorites of 2013. THE QUOTABLE KIERKEGAARD, edited by Gordon Marino, is a “collection of awesome quotes from that great Danish philosopher,” Tyson says.

The English translation of THE PLUM IN THE GOLDEN VASE was finally completed when PUP released the fifth volume this fall. Tash Aw names David Tod Roy’s translation as one of his favorites of the year, saying that this last volume “completes the joyous rediscovery of a genuine masterpiece.” See the full entries for both Tyson and Aw here in the Wall Street Journal‘s “12 Months of Reading” article.

For the scientists in the bunch, EINSTEIN AND THE QUANTUM is another 2013 favorite. Science Friday’s Ira Flatow named the book as one of his favorites, and Jennifer Oullette picked it for her list on Cocktail Party Physics. Have that “Einstein curiosity” about this title? Hear more from author A. Douglas Stone on this Physics Central Podcast.

Maria Popova of Brain Pickings selects ITALO CALVINO: Letters as one of her “Best Books on Writing and Creativity 2013.” Popova called the book “an absolute treasure trove in its entirety — the most profound intersection of writing, philosophy, and literary voyeurism since Susan Sontag’s journals and the diary of Anaïs Nin.” PUP is releasing a paperback edition this spring.

To round out our bunch–or should we say batch–we turn to the beloved cookbook by Merry White, which was re-released in a 40th Anniversary Edition this fall. COOKING FOR CROWDS is named one of the Atlantic‘s “Best Food Books of 2013.” Illustrated by the New Yorker‘s Ed Koren, this charming book offers simple, step-by-step instructions for easy cooking and entertaining on a grand scale–from hors d’oeuvres to desserts. Corby Kummer says:

“Not just enormously charming but useful, full of sturdy recipes that can still seem mildly exotic no matter how much we flatter ourselves at the sophistication of our palates….This is more, that is, than an artifact of Brooklyn avant la lettre. It’s full of practical dishes and tricks you’ll call your own, like tossing fresh-roasted almonds in maple syrup to serve on ice cream.”

World News 12-18


THIS WEEK’S REVIEWS

Gurcharan Das discusses the state of India and the issues highlighted in AN UNCERTAIN GLORY in his recent Wall Street Journal review. Listen to this interview with Amartya Sen, who co-authored the book with Jean Dréze.

You can also hear an interview with Francisco Bethencourt, the author of RACISMS, as he spoke to The Forum this week. RACISMS is the first comprehensive history of racism, from the Crusades to the twentieth century.

Did you hear all of the buzz about US President Barack Obama’s selfie? PUP author Simon Blackburn says it could have been worse. Check out his explanation in the Financial Times. His book, MIRROR, MIRROR, will be released this spring.

 

Merry White Brings “Cooking for Crowds” to Harvard Bookstore

White_CookingForCrowdsF13As the holidays are approaching, some people are looking for that perfect recipe to cook up something delicious to wow all of their friends and family. Merry White, author of Cooking for Crowds, has released the 40th anniversary edition of her book, which includes a new introduction and new illustrations, and will offer her readers the recipes they’ve been searching for.

She will be at the Harvard Book Store on December 5th at 7:00 PM to discuss the book and to sign copies, which will be for sale in the store. Want more information? Click here.


When Cooking for Crowds was first published in 1974, home cooks in America were just waking up to the great foods the rest of the world was eating, from pesto and curries to Ukrainian pork and baklava. Now Merry White’s indispensable classic is back in print for a new generation of readers to savor, and her international recipes are as crowd-pleasing as ever–whether you are hosting a large party numbering in the dozens, or a more intimate gathering of family and friends.

In this delightful cookbook, White shares all the ingenious tricks she learned as a young Harvard graduate student earning her way through school as a caterer to European scholars, heads of state, and cosmopolitans like Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis. With the help of her friend Julia Child, the cook just down the block in Cambridge, White surmounted unforeseen obstacles and epic-sized crises in the kitchen, along the way developing the surefire strategies described here. All of these recipes can be prepared in your kitchen using ordinary pots, pans, and utensils. For each tantalizing recipe, White gives portions for serving groups of six, twelve, twenty, and fifty.

Looking for something to do with all those fall apples? We recommend Senegalese Soup from Cooking for Crowds

Senegalese Soup

Senegalese soup is a smooth cream of chicken with curry. A classic French adaptation of Oriental tastes, this soup is elegant and smooth, and acceptable as a beginning to any meal.

6 12 20 50

onions, chopped 2 4 7 15
celery stalks, chopped 2 4 6 10
apples, peeled and chopped 2 4 7 10
butter 3 tbs 6 tbs 10 tbs 3 sticks
curry powder 2 tbs 4 tbs 8 tbs ¾ c
all-purpose flour ¼ c ½ c ¾ c 2 c
chicken stock or broth 4 c 8 c 4 qts 8 qts
salt (to taste)
chili powder (to taste)
cayenne (to taste)
heavy cream 2 c 4 c 5½ c 10 c

Garnish
fresh parsley, chopped
or
avocado, peeled and chopped

In a large saucepan (or two kettles) sauté the onions, celery, and apples in the butter until the mixture is soft but not browned. Add the curry powder and sauté for 2 minutes more, then add the flour, stirring well. Cook, stirring, for a minute or so more. Gradually stir in the chicken stock or broth and cook the soup until it thickens. Add the salt, chili powder, and cayenne to taste.

Puree the mixture in a blender or put through a food mill, a few cups at a time, until smooth. Chill the soup, if serving it cold. Just before serving, stir in the cream and garnish each portion with parsley (hot) or avocado (cold).

note: While the soup can be served hot or cold, it is best (and easiest for a crowd) if served cold.


White_CookingForCrowdsF13This recipe is taken from Cooking for Crowds by Merry “Corky” White. We are publishing a 40th edition of this classic cookbook in December.