Bird Fact Friday – Is the Mute Swan silent?

From page 284 of Waterfowl of North America, Europe & Asia:

The Mute Swan is not mute at all. Its most frequent call is a wee-rrrr or wiingrr-iew with a high-pitched second syllable. It will also make an in-rrr sound accompanied with strong hissing in aggression. In flight, the wings produce a whistling sound, typical of the species.

Waterfowl of North America, Europe, and Asia: An Identification Guide 
Sébastien Reeber

ReeberThis is the ultimate guide for anyone who wants to identify the ducks, geese, and swans of North America, Europe, and Asia. With 72 stunning color plates (that include more than 920 drawings), over 650 superb photos, and in-depth descriptions, this book brings together the most current information on 84 species of Eurasian and North American waterfowl, and on more than 100 hybrids. The guide delves into taxonomy, identification features, determination of age and sex, geographic variations, measurements, voice, molt, and hybridization. In addition, the status of each species is treated with up-to-date details on distribution, population size, habitats, and life cycle. Color plates and photos are accompanied by informative captions and 85 distribution maps are also provided. Taken together, this is an unrivaled, must-have reference for any birder with an interest in the world’s waterfowl.

Bird Fact Friday – How do hawks fly such great distances?

From page 7 of Hawks from Every Angle:

Several factors influence the migratory pathways of raptors, including geography. Mountainous sites are famous for attracting concentrations of migrating hawks, in part because as wind strikes a ridge it is deflected upward, providing birds with a current of air—or updraft—along the ridge for more energy-efficient means of travel. Raptors can travel along these updrafts for miles, covering great distances with little to no effort.
Hawks from Every Angle: How to Identify Raptors In Flight
Jerry Liguori
Foreword by David A. Sibley

hawksIdentifying hawks in flight is a tricky business. Across North America, tens of thousands of people gather every spring and fall at more than one thousand known hawk migration sites—from New Jersey’s Cape May to California’s Golden Gate. Yet, as many discover, a standard field guide, with its emphasis on plumage, is often of little help in identifying those raptors soaring, gliding, or flapping far, far away.

Hawks from Every Angle takes hawk identification to new heights. It offers a fresh approach that literally looks at the birds from every angle, compares and contrasts deceptively similar species, and provides the pictures (and words) needed for identification in the field. Jerry Liguori pinpoints innovative, field-tested identification traits for each species from the various angles that they are seen.

Featuring 339 striking color photos on 68 color plates and 32 black & white photos, Hawks from Every Angle is unique in presenting a host of meticulously crafted pictures for each of the 19 species it covers in detail—the species most common to migration sites throughout the United States and Canada. All aspects of raptor identification are discussed, including plumage, shape, and flight style traits.

For all birders who follow hawk migration and have found themselves wondering if the raptor in the sky matches the one in the guide, Hawks from Every Angle—distilling an expert’s years of experience for the first time into a comprehensive array of truly useful photos and other pointers for each species—is quite simply a must.

Bird Fact Friday – Southern Africa: A Birder’s Paradise

From page 10 of Birds of Southern Africa:

Southern Africa encompasses Namibia, Botswana, South Africa, Lesotho, Swaziland, and southern and central Mozambique, as well as oceanic waters within 200 nautical miles of the coast. In total it covers a land area of approximately 3.5 million square kilometers and has incredible diversity in its bird life. More birds breed in Southern Africa than in the United States and Canada combined. Currently, there are 951 known species, 144 of which are endemic or near-endemic. One of the reasons for this high bird diversity is the region’s climatic and topographical diversity. The climate ranges from cool-temperate in the southwest to hot and tropical in the north.

Birds of Southern Africa Fourth Edition 
Ian Sinclair, Phil Hockey, Warwick Tarboton & Peter Ryan
Africa

 

Birds of Southern Africa continues to be the best and most authoritative guide to the bird species of this remarkable region. This fully revised edition covers all birds found in South Africa, Lesotho, Swaziland, Namibia, Botswana, Zimbabwe, and southern Mozambique. The 213 dazzling color plates depict more than 950 species and are accompanied by more than 950 color maps and detailed facing text.

This edition includes new identification information on behavior and habitat, updated taxonomy, additional artwork, improved raptor and wader plates with flight images for each species, up-to-date distribution maps reflecting resident and migrant species, and calendar bars indicating occurrence throughout the year and breeding months.

Bird Fact Friday – Penguins of the tropics

From page 22 of Wildlife of the Galápagos:

The Galápagos Penguin is unique in a couple of different ways. At 50 centimeters in length, it is one of the smallest penguins in the world. It is the only penguin to breed entirely within the tropics, and the only one to be found in the northern hemisphere.

Wildlife of the Galápagos 
Second Edition
Julian Fitter, Daniel Fitter & David Hosking
Introduction

FitterSince its first publication more than a decade ago, Wildlife of the Galápagos has become the definitive, classic field guide to the natural splendors of this amazing part of the world. Now fully updated, this essential and comprehensive guide has been expanded to include the more than 400 commonly seen birds, mammals, reptiles, invertebrates, and plants, and other coastal and marine life of this wondrous archipelago. Over 650 stunning color photographs, maps, and drawings are accompanied by accessible, descriptive text. This new edition includes information about all the common fish of the region and Spanish names are featured for the first time. There is also a revised section that discusses the islands’ history, climate, geology, and conservation, with the most current details on visitor sites.

50 lucky birders will win a North American Warbler Fold-Out Guide

Warblers

In honor of the start of warbler migration season, we’re giving away the laminated, portable North American Warbler Fold-Out Guide to the first 50 entrants to our giveaway hosted by Rafflecopter. The foldout includes identification data for warblers in North America with accompanying QR codes that provide 3D models and songs.

To enter, please follow the instructions in the box below. Good luck!

Warblers

 

*UPDATE*

As of 3:21PM EST, we have reached 50 entrants. Thank you to everyone who participated! If you missed your chance, check back next week for another giveaway.

Kicking Off Warbler Migration Season

Welcome back to the warblers! As winter 2016 struggles to come to an end, warblers are being spotted across the country. From now until mid-May, take the opportunity to watch these birds travel back from as far as South America. PUP has a variety of resources for warbler identification. If you want to go in search of these musical little birds, grab your binoculars and we’ll supply the guides!

WarblerThe Warbler Guide is an essential resource for the serious warbler enthusiast. The wealth of information alongside beautiful photographs makes identification easy.

If you don’t want to bring a heavy book with you into the field, fear not—we have lots of portable options! You can download the Warbler Guide App for iOS to get all the benefits of the book in the palm of your hand, plus many more, or you can download our free pdfs. The Quickfinders sort warblers in a variety of ways to suit your needs, and The North American Warblers fold out has QR codes to deliver the most information in a convenient package.

As the warblers come flying back, use these guides to find and identify them in their natural habitat and be sure to tweet your photos to @PrincetonNature.

Warbler

April fooling among our avian friends

cowbird

On April 1st we devise clever pranks and hoaxes for our friends while trying to avoid becoming April fools ourselves. In the animal kingdom, trickery can be used as a means of survival. For example, brood parasitism is the practice of one bird laying their eggs in the nest of another bird (of the same or different species), causing the fool to raise the trickster’s young in addition to, or sometimes at the expense of, their own. Songbirds and other groups including grebes, waterfowl, gulls, and pigeons frequently engage in this behavior among their own species.

The Common Cuckoo of Eurasia is best known for laying its eggs in the nests of birds of different species. It has perfected egg mimicry, making it difficult for the host to differentiate between its own eggs and those of the interloper.

Cowbirds are another species that engage in brood parasitism, to the point where they never build nests of their own. One hundred forty four species of birds have reared cowbird young. The female cowbird will wait until the potential host has completed its nest and laid its eggs before sneaking into the nest just before dawn (while both bird parents are away) and depositing a single egg within a few seconds. Later in the day, the cowbird will steal one of the host’s own eggs, poke a hole in it, and eat the contents. In many cases the host is successfully fooled and will raise the cowbird’s eggs with their own. Some birds—including the American Robin and Gray Catbird—recognize cowbird eggs and push them out of the nest.

The cowbird and cuckoo are clearly masters of fooling. This April Fools Day, think of their example as you set up the perfect pranks to trick your friends!

cuckoo

Source: The Birdwatcher’s Companion to North American Birdlife 

Bird Fact Friday – Where do hawks migrate?

From page 7 of Hawks from Every Angle:

Hawks migrate twice a year as they travel to and from their breeding grounds. They tend to congregate in mountainous and coastal areas. Peninsula sites in particular, such as Cape May Point in New Jersey, are great places to witness raptor migration. There are more than 1,000 known hawk migration sites throughout North America, and new ones are discovered each year as raptor watching increases in popularity. The Hawk Migration Association of North America publishes spring and fall journals that are necessary for anyone interested in witnessing hawks in their natural habitat.

Hawks from Every Angle: How to Identify Raptors In Flight
Jerry Liguori

hawksIdentifying hawks in flight is a tricky business. Across North America, tens of thousands of people gather every spring and fall at more than one thousand known hawk migration sites—from New Jersey’s Cape May to California’s Golden Gate. Yet, as many discover, a standard field guide, with its emphasis on plumage, is often of little help in identifying those raptors soaring, gliding, or flapping far, far away.

Hawks from Every Angle takes hawk identification to new heights. It offers a fresh approach that literally looks at the birds from every angle, compares and contrasts deceptively similar species, and provides the pictures (and words) needed for identification in the field. Jerry Liguori pinpoints innovative, field-tested identification traits for each species from the various angles that they are seen.

Featuring 339 striking color photos on 68 color plates and 32 black & white photos, Hawks from Every Angle is unique in presenting a host of meticulously crafted pictures for each of the 19 species it covers in detail—the species most common to migration sites throughout the United States and Canada. All aspects of raptor identification are discussed, including plumage, shape, and flight style traits.

For all birders who follow hawk migration and have found themselves wondering if the raptor in the sky matches the one in the guide, Hawks from Every Angle—distilling an expert’s years of experience for the first time into a comprehensive array of truly useful photos and other pointers for each species—is quite simply a must.

Bird Fact Friday – When do birds of the same species vary in color?

From page 361 of The Birdwatcher’s Companion to North American Birdlife:

According to Gloger’s Rule, representatives of bird or mammal species that breed in warmer, more humid climates tend to be darker in color than those breeding in cooler, drier climates. For example, the pale plumage of the desert-dwelling races of the Horned Lark contrasts strikingly with that of races from the humid Northwest. The implications of Gloger’s Rule are not yet understood.

The Birdwatcher’s Companion to North American Birdlife
Christopher W. Leahy
Illustrations by Gordon Morrison

birdsThe quintessential A-Z guide, this is a book that anyone interested in birds will want to have close at hand. First published more than twenty years ago, this highly respected reference volume has been fully revised and updated. It captures the fundamental details as well as the immense fascination of North American bird life in a style that is authoritative, yet fresh, witty, and eminently readable.

Both a practical handbook for amateurs and a handy reference for seasoned birders, it provides accounts of the basic elements of birdlife, as well as a wealth of easy-to-access information on such subjects as bird physiology and anatomy, terms and jargon, name definitions and etymology, and ornithological groupings.

Readers will discover everything from the color of a dipper’s eggs (glossy, white, and unmarked) to the number of species of woodpeckers in the world (216). They will also find more than one hundred of the best-known and most colorful colloquial names for birds, alphabetized and briefly defined. Collective nouns relating to birdlife—for example, “an exaltation of larks”—are included in the “Nouns of Assemblage” section. Biographical sketches of persons responsible for describing or naming a significant number of North American species are also included, as well as handsome and accurate illustrations by Gordon Morrison. And for those who want to go beyond reading about their favorite birds and take to the great outdoors, the book offers still more useful information: descriptive entries on a selection of the best-known birdwatching spots of North America.

Bird Fact Friday – Roadrunners

From page 24 of Birds of India:

The Phasianidae family of birds includes Partridges, Pheasants, and Allies. When threatened, they prefer to escape on foot despite their powerful flight capability. They feed and nest on the ground, but many of them roost in trees at night. They forage by scratching at the ground with strong feet to expose food hidden among dead leaves or in the soil.

Birds of India: Pakistan, Nepal, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Sri Lanka, and the Maldives 
Second Edition
Richard Grimmett, Carol Inskipp & Tim Inskipp

IndiaThe best field guide to the birds of the Indian subcontinent is now even better. Thoroughly revised, with 73 new plates and many others updated or repainted, the second edition of Birds of India now features all maps and text opposite the plates for quicker and easier reference. Newly identified species have been added, the text has been extensively revised, and all the maps are new. Comprehensive and definitive, this is the indispensable guide for anyone birding in this part of the world.

Bird Fact Friday – Flightless Ducks

From page 32 of The Crossley ID Guide: Britain and Ireland:

During the summer, male ducks moult such that they lose all their flight feathers for several weeks and look remarkably similar to the females of their breed. It usually occurs on breeding grounds that are chosen for their plentiful food supplies and water that is deep enough to allow diving. These two factors, combined with duller plumage that makes it easier to camouflage, protect the flightless birds from predators. When they are in this state they are called eclipse males.

The Crossley ID Guide: Britain and Ireland
Richard Crossley & Dominic Couzens

CrossleyThis guide is a celebration of the beauty of birds and the British and Irish countryside. Aimed at beginner and intermediate birders, yet suitable for all levels, this new volume in the groundbreaking Crossley ID Guide series is the most user-friendly guide to the birds of Britain and Ireland. Following The Crossley ID Guides’ award-winning design, this book looks at all regularly occurring species in Britain and Ireland, and shows readers how to identify birds in their natural habitats using size, structure, shape, probability, and behavior—just like the experts do! Stunning images are accompanied by the colorful and compelling text of Dominic Couzens, one of Britain’s leading nature writers.

This unique book treats more than 300 species—all the regularly occurring birds likely to be encountered by observers—and the guide’s attractive pages provide a real-life approach to bird identification. Beautiful, in-focus scenes present birds in various plumages and in lifelike poses set in identifiable British and Irish habitats. The plates also illustrate how a bird’s appearance changes with distance. Organizing images in cohesive, easy-to-understand plates rather than as separate photographs, this book also sets itself apart by containing more images that demonstrate flight, behavior, habitat, and plumages than any other volume available. Not only is this field guide a reference book, it is also a spectacular teaching resource that makes it easy for nature enthusiasts to see and appreciate the big picture of bird identification.

Bird Fact Friday – The elusive fairy penguin

From page 105-106 of Penguins: The Ultimate Guide:

The fairy penguin, native to Australia and New Zealand, is the smallest of all types of penguins. On average they weigh just 1 kilogram. Most of their activities are well hidden; they build their nests underground and, when they do have to travel in plain sight, do it in tight packs, scurrying quickly from point A to point B.

Penguins: The Ultimate Guide
Tui De Roy, Mark Jones, and Julie Cornthwaite

PenguinsPenguins are perhaps the most beloved birds. On land, their behavior appears so humorous and expressive that we can be excused for attributing to them moods and foibles similar to our own. Few realize how complex and mysterious their private lives truly are, as most of their existence takes place far from our prying eyes, hidden beneath the ocean waves. This stunningly illustrated book provides a unique look at these extraordinary creatures and the cutting-edge science that is helping us to better understand them. Featuring more than 400 breathtaking photos, this is the ultimate guide to all 18 species of penguins, including those with retiring personalities or nocturnal habits that tend to be overlooked and rarely photographed.

A book that no bird enthusiast or armchair naturalist should do without, Penguins includes discussions of penguin conservation, informative species profiles, fascinating penguin facts, and tips on where to see penguins in the wild.