Bird Fact Friday — Red-Rumped Parrot

From page 194 of Birds of Australia:

The male Red-Rumped Parrot is a bright green parrot with a red rump, lemon-yellow belly and vent, and a subtle blue wash on the shoulder and forehead. It is told from male Mulga Parrot by its lack of red on the nape and vent and absence of a yellow shoulder patch. Females are dull brownish-green with little colour except some green on the rump. The lack of any strong shoulder mark or reddish nape patch separates this species from female Mulga Parrot.

A male Red-Rumped Parrot (Psephotus haematonotus)

Red-rumped parrot is most likely to be found in pairs or small flocks. It readily perches in the open, is often conspicuous and approachable, and is more regularly found around country towns than Mulga Parrot. Red-rumped is a common species of the south-east, where it occurs in farmlands with scattered trees and grassy and other open woodlands, often around watercourses.

Birds of Australia
By Iain Campbell, Sam Woods & Nick Leseberg
With photography by Geoff Jones

Australia is home to a spectacular diversity of birdlife, from parrots and penguins to emus and vibrant passerines. Birds of Australia covers all 714 species of resident birds and regularly occurring migrants and features more than 1,100 stunning color photographs, including many photos of subspecies and plumage variations never before seen in a field guide. Detailed facing-page species accounts describe key identification features such as size, plumage, distribution, behavior, and voice. This one-of-a-kind guide also provides extensive habitat descriptions with a large number of accompanying photos. The text relies on the very latest IOC taxonomy and the distribution maps incorporate the most current mapping data, making this the most up-to-date guide to Australian birds.

  • Covers all 714 species of resident birds and regularly occurring migrants
  • Features more than 1,100 stunning color photos
  • Includes facing-page species accounts, habitat descriptions, and distribution maps
  • The ideal photographic guide for beginners and seasoned birders alike

 

Bird Fact Friday — The Spinifex Pigeon

From page 62 of Birds of Australia:

A handsome, reddish inland species, Spinifex Pigeon is mostly ruddy-coloured and has a pointed rufous topknot and a striking face pattern: Bare red skin surrounds a pale eye, and the face is striped black and white, with some subtle blue markings too. Bold black bars are spread across the wings and sides of the mantle, and some subspecies also show a bold white bar across the chest. It is inconspicuous when it forages on the ground, and is well camoufl aged, as its reddish colouration mirrors the red dirt and the rocky outcrops within the arid landscapes it inhabits: rocky and hilly areas and spinifex grasslands within the north of the Outback.

The Spinifex Pigeon (Geophaps plumifera) is typically 7.5-9 inches tall.

It occurs patchily within the NT, c. and n. WA, far w. QLD, and far n. SA. Spinifex Pigeon is never far from water in its arid environment, and is therefore best located around shrinking water sources late in the dry season, when these nomadic birds become more concentrated.

Birds of Australia
By Iain Campbell, Sam Woods & Nick Leseberg
With photography by Geoff Jones

Australia is home to a spectacular diversity of birdlife, from parrots and penguins to emus and vibrant passerines. Birds of Australia covers all 714 species of resident birds and regularly occurring migrants and features more than 1,100 stunning color photographs, including many photos of subspecies and plumage variations never before seen in a field guide. Detailed facing-page species accounts describe key identification features such as size, plumage, distribution, behavior, and voice. This one-of-a-kind guide also provides extensive habitat descriptions with a large number of accompanying photos. The text relies on the very latest IOC taxonomy and the distribution maps incorporate the most current mapping data, making this the most up-to-date guide to Australian birds.

  • Covers all 714 species of resident birds and regularly occurring migrants
  • Features more than 1,100 stunning color photos
  • Includes facing-page species accounts, habitat descriptions, and distribution maps
  • The ideal photographic guide for beginners and seasoned birders alike

 

 

Bird Fact Friday —The Secretarybird, an odd raptor

From page 180 of Birds of Kruger National Park:

The Sectretarybird is a very odd bird of prey in an ancient lineage and its own family. It is a tall, long-legged, crane-like, ground-loving raptor with distinctive quill-like plumes on its head and bright-red facial skin. In flight, the combination of dark trailing edge to the wing, diamond-shaped tail and long spatulate central tail projection is unmistakable. This bird is uncommon in Kruger, numbering about 300 individuals, and is declining throughout South Africa. It prefers open grasslands and savannahs, where it strides about searching for reptiles, small mammals and insects, which it bludgeons with its powerful legs.

The Secretarybird is featured on the South African national coat of arms. Photo credit: Keith Barnes & Ken Behrens.

The strange name of the Secretarybird was once thought to originate from the quills on its head bearing some resemblance to the quill pens used by an office secretary in times past. However, it is more likely that the name is a corruption of saqr-et-tair, the Arabic name for the bird, which translates as ‘hunter-bird’.

Birds of Kruger National Park
Keith Barnes & Ken Behrens

South Africa’s Kruger National Park is one of the largest and most iconic conservation areas in Africa. Habitats range from wide-open savannah and rugged thornveld to broadleaved mopani woodland. This microhabitat variation gives Kruger a phenomenal diversity of some 520 bird species, half of which are resident. From Africa’s most extraordinary eagles, like the scarlet-faced Bateleur, to electric-colored glossy-starlings and jewel-like finches, Kruger offers an avian celebration of form and color. It is also a crucial conservation area, supporting South Africa’s largest viable populations of vultures, eagles, and large terrestrial birds.

This field guide offers a unique window into the world of Kruger’s birds. More than 500 stunning color photographs illustrate the 259 most frequently encountered species, and a habitat-based approach assists in identification. The authoritative text provides key information about identification, habitat, behavior, biology, and conservation. The guide contains information likely to be new to even the most experienced birders, but is written in a nontechnical style that makes it accessible to anyone.

  • An essential guide to Kruger’s birds
  • Perfect for new and experienced birders alike
  • Small, portable format ideal for field use
  • Unique attractive layout with more than 500 stunning color photographs
  • Covers the 259 most frequently seen species
  • Uses a habitat-based approach to aid identification
  • Authoritative and accessible text provides key information about identification, behavior, biology, and conservation

 

Bird Fact Friday — The Male & Female Black Cuckooshrike

From page 117 of Birds of Kruger National Park:

The sexes of the Black Cuckooshrike are very different: the male is a dumpy, all-black bird with a yellow-orange base to the gape and a usually inconspicuous yellow shoulder mark; the female is a more distinctive grey-brown with bars below and bright yellow edges to the wing and tail feathers.

The male Black Cuckooshrike (left) could not be more different than the female Black Cuckooshrike (right). Photo credit: Keith Barnes & Ken Behrens.

This is an uncommon and unobtrusive resident of Kruger, its presence often revealed by a prolonged insect-like “trrrrrrrrr” trill. It may join flocks of other birds, but can also be solitary, searching the canopy for caterpillars and other arboreal prey.

Birds of Kruger National Park
Keith Barnes & Ken Behrens

South Africa’s Kruger National Park is one of the largest and most iconic conservation areas in Africa. Habitats range from wide-open savannah and rugged thornveld to broadleaved mopani woodland. This microhabitat variation gives Kruger a phenomenal diversity of some 520 bird species, half of which are resident. From Africa’s most extraordinary eagles, like the scarlet-faced Bateleur, to electric-colored glossy-starlings and jewel-like finches, Kruger offers an avian celebration of form and color. It is also a crucial conservation area, supporting South Africa’s largest viable populations of vultures, eagles, and large terrestrial birds.

This field guide offers a unique window into the world of Kruger’s birds. More than 500 stunning color photographs illustrate the 259 most frequently encountered species, and a habitat-based approach assists in identification. The authoritative text provides key information about identification, habitat, behavior, biology, and conservation. The guide contains information likely to be new to even the most experienced birders, but is written in a nontechnical style that makes it accessible to anyone.

  • An essential guide to Kruger’s birds
  • Perfect for new and experienced birders alike
  • Small, portable format ideal for field use
  • Unique attractive layout with more than 500 stunning color photographs
  • Covers the 259 most frequently seen species
  • Uses a habitat-based approach to aid identification
  • Authoritative and accessible text provides key information about identification, behavior, biology, and conservation

 

Bird Fact Friday – The Blue Waxbill

From page 156 of Birds of Kruger National Park:

Waxbills are small finches that are inconspicuous despite their bright coloration. The Blue Waxbill is readily identified by its entirely sky-blue underparts, rump and tail, silver-pink bill and grey-brown upperparts. The female is paler than the male, and juveniles are mostly grey-brown with a powder-blue wash to the face.

The Blue Waxbill (Uraeginthus angolensis) is a little more than 5 inches in length. Photo credit: Keith Barnes & Ken Behrens.

It is a common and widespread resident in a variety of habitats in Kruger, favouring drier woodlands close to permanent water where it regularly comes to drink, often dispersing during perods of drought. It feeds mainly on grass seeds but will also take insects, and frequently gives a loud and distinctive high-pitched “tsee-tsee” call, especially when flushed.

Birds of Kruger National Park
Keith Barnes & Ken Behrens

South Africa’s Kruger National Park is one of the largest and most iconic conservation areas in Africa. Habitats range from wide-open savannah and rugged thornveld to broadleaved mopani woodland. This microhabitat variation gives Kruger a phenomenal diversity of some 520 bird species, half of which are resident. From Africa’s most extraordinary eagles, like the scarlet-faced Bateleur, to electric-colored glossy-starlings and jewel-like finches, Kruger offers an avian celebration of form and color. It is also a crucial conservation area, supporting South Africa’s largest viable populations of vultures, eagles, and large terrestrial birds.

This field guide offers a unique window into the world of Kruger’s birds. More than 500 stunning color photographs illustrate the 259 most frequently encountered species, and a habitat-based approach assists in identification. The authoritative text provides key information about identification, habitat, behavior, biology, and conservation. The guide contains information likely to be new to even the most experienced birders, but is written in a nontechnical style that makes it accessible to anyone.

  • An essential guide to Kruger’s birds
  • Perfect for new and experienced birders alike
  • Small, portable format ideal for field use
  • Unique attractive layout with more than 500 stunning color photographs
  • Covers the 259 most frequently seen species
  • Uses a habitat-based approach to aid identification
  • Authoritative and accessible text provides key information about identification, behavior, biology, and conservation

Bird Fact Friday – Southern Carmine Bee-eater

From page 97 of Birds of Kruger National Park:

The Southern Carmine Bee-eater is a large, spectacular, long, slender, carmine-pink and teal-blue bee-eater with a long, pointed tail and black bill and facial mask. Immatures are duller than adults and lack long tail feathers. It is a common non-breeding summer migrant (December–April) to Kruger, where it can gather in large groups and often attends bush fires to feed on fleeing insects.

A mature Southern Carmine Bee-eater (Merops nubicoides). (Photo credit: Keith Barnes & Ken Behrens)

The “trik-trik-trik” or “ga-gaga” calls, sound more guttural than those of European Bee-eater. Although not a common behaviour, Southern Carmine Bee-eaters have been recorded sitting on the backs of antelopes or Kori Bustards, swooping out and catching insects that are flushed. It specializes in catching large flying insects, including termites, cicadas, dragonflies, butterflies and locusts and regurgitates pellets of indigestible insect remains.

 

Birds of Kruger National Park
Keith Barnes & Ken Behrens

South Africa’s Kruger National Park is one of the largest and most iconic conservation areas in Africa. Habitats range from wide-open savannah and rugged thornveld to broadleaved mopani woodland. This microhabitat variation gives Kruger a phenomenal diversity of some 520 bird species, half of which are resident. From Africa’s most extraordinary eagles, like the scarlet-faced Bateleur, to electric-colored glossy-starlings and jewel-like finches, Kruger offers an avian celebration of form and color. It is also a crucial conservation area, supporting South Africa’s largest viable populations of vultures, eagles, and large terrestrial birds.

This field guide offers a unique window into the world of Kruger’s birds. More than 500 stunning color photographs illustrate the 259 most frequently encountered species, and a habitat-based approach assists in identification. The authoritative text provides key information about identification, habitat, behavior, biology, and conservation. The guide contains information likely to be new to even the most experienced birders, but is written in a nontechnical style that makes it accessible to anyone.

  • An essential guide to Kruger’s birds
  • Perfect for new and experienced birders alike
  • Small, portable format ideal for field use
  • Unique attractive layout with more than 500 stunning color photographs
  • Covers the 259 most frequently seen species
  • Uses a habitat-based approach to aid identification
  • Authoritative and accessible text provides key information about identification, behavior, biology, and conservation

 

Bird Fact Friday – The Wattled Jacana

From page 98 of Birds of Western Ecuador:

The Wattled Jacana is common in freshwater marshes, flooded rice paddies, ditches, and vegetated margins of lakes and sluggish rivers in the lowlands. The distinctive adult is not likely to be confused with any other species (W Ecuador birds have black scapular patches, not evident in this photo). Immature is extremely different from adult and has no similar species: it is all white below and has distinctive black-and-white head stripes.

The Wattled Jacana (Jacana jacana).

The Wattled Jacana forages methodically, in singles, pairs, or scattered groups, over matted and floating vegetation, where it is generally easy to see. Flight is slow, usually low to ground, with rather stiff wingbeats, legs and long toes protruding way beyond tail; when alighting, wings are often held outstretched, showing off yellow primaries. They can be quite noisy, emitting a series of loud yapping and yelping, cackling notes and churring sounds.

Birds of Western Ecuador
By Nick Athanas & Paul J. Greenfield
With special contributions from Iain Campbell, Pablo Cervantes Daza, Andrew Spencer & Sam Woods

Western Ecuador is famed for its astonishingly diverse birdlife, from colorful hummingbirds and outrageous toucans to more difficult groups like raptors, flycatchers, and ovenbirds. Here is the ultimate photographic guide to the spectacular birds of this region. Featuring nearly 1,500 stunning color photos of 946 species, this richly detailed and taxonomically sophisticated field guide will help you with even the toughest identification challenges. Species accounts, photos, and color distribution maps appear side by side, making it easier than ever to find what you are looking for, whether you are in the field or preparing for your trip.

  • Features nearly 1,500 photos of 946 species
  • Includes facing-page species accounts, photos, and maps
  • Provides photos of multiple plumages for many species
  • Helps you to differentiate between similar species

 

 

 

Bird Fact Friday – Blyth’s Tragopan

From page 28 of A Photographic Field Guide to the Birds of India, Pakistan, Nepal, Bhutan, Sri Lanka, and Bangladesh:

Blyth’s tragopan is a large, brilliantly coloured game bird. It has bare yellow facial skin with a black band extending from the base of its bill to its crown. The bird has an unmarked red head, rusty-red neck and breast, and pale blue horns. Its upperparts are brownish red with many white ocelli.

 

Blyth’s tragopan (Tragopan blythii) are typically found on steep slopes in montane forest undergrowth.

Males tend to be 68 cm, while females are 59 cm and have a brown uniform with black buff and white mottling. They both also have pinkish-brown legs and white-spotted red flanks.

A Photographic Field Guide to the Birds of India, Pakistan, Nepal, Bhutan, Sri Lanka, and Bangladesh
By Bikram Grewal, Sumit Sen, Sarwandeep Singh, Nikhil Devasar & Garima Bhatia

This is the only comprehensive photographic field guide to the birds of the entire Indian subcontinent. Every distinct species and subspecies—some 1,375 in all—is covered with photographs, text, and maps. The guide features more than 4,000 stunning photographs, many never before published, which have been carefully selected to illustrate key identification features of each species. The up-to-date facing-page text includes concise descriptions of plumage, voice, range, habitat, and recent taxonomic changes. Each species has a detailed map reflecting the latest distribution information and containing notes on status and population density. The guide also features an introduction that provides an overview of birdlife and a brief history of ornithology in India and its neighbors. The result is an encyclopedic photographic guide that is essential for everyone birding anywhere in the subcontinent.

  • Covers all 1,375 subcontinental bird species
  • Features more than 4,000 stunning photographs to aid quick field identification
  • Includes up-to-date facing-page text and range maps
  • Contains concise descriptions of plumage, voice, habitat, and much more

Bird Fact Friday – Northern Harrier

From page 140 of Raptors of Mexico and Central America:

Norther Harriers are slim-bodied raptor with long legs, long wings, and a long tail. Their distinctive quartering flight, flying low over the ground, is unique. A white patch on the uppertail coverts and a dark head that appears hooded and shows an owllike facial disk are distinctive. Sexes have different adult plumages, but are nearly identical in juvenile plumage. Females are noticeably larger than males.

Northern Harrier (Circus hudsonius). Adult female. Adult females have brown upperparts, heavily streaked underparts, white bands on underwings, and yellow eyes. Photo credit: Richard Pavek

They hunt most of the time with their distinctive quartering flight, flying low over the ground and pouncing quickly when prey is spotted. However, they can fly directly toward avian prey in a rapid flight from some distance, with a short, twisting tail chase at the end. Males prey more on birds, while females take more mammals, but they both take both. They have been reported to drown waterfowl. Recent studies have shown that Northern Harriers can locate prey by sound almost as well as owls can, which explains the facial disk.

Raptors of Mexico and Central America
William S. Clark & N. John Schmitt
With a foreword by Lloyd Kiff

Raptors are among the most challenging birds to identify in the field due to their bewildering variability of plumage, flight silhouettes, and behavior. Raptors of Mexico and Central America is the first illustrated guide to the region’s 69 species of raptors, including vagrants. It features 32 stunning color plates and 213 color photos, and a distribution map for each regularly occurring species. Detailed species accounts describe key identification features, age-related plumages, status and distribution, subspecies, molt, habitats, behaviors, potential confusion species, and more.

Raptors of Mexico and Central America is the essential field guide to this difficult bird group and the ideal travel companion for anyone visiting this region of the world.

Five Books for Hawk Migration Season

From hawks, to falcons, to our illustrious bald eagle, raptors are the kings of the sky, so it seems only right to pay homage to them during this fall migration season. Whether you’re a birdwatching pro or new to the hobby, we’ve picked out five guides that can help you identify various raptors across America and learn more about birds as a whole.

Whether soaring or perched, diurnal birds of prey often present challenging identification problems for the bird enthusiast. Variable plumage, color morphs, and unique individual characteristics are just some of the factors bird watchers must consider when identifying the different species. In A Photographic Guide to North American Raptors, two of the world’s top experts on raptors provide an essential guide to the variations in the species, allowing for easier recognition of key identification points. All the distinguishing marks described have been exhaustively tested in a wide range of field conditions by the authors as well as the colleagues and students who have learned from them.
Raptors are among the most challenging birds to identify in the field due to their bewildering variability of plumage, flight silhouettes, and behavior. Raptors of Mexico and Central America is the first illustrated guide to the region’s 69 species of raptors, including vagrants. It features 32 stunning color plates and 213 color photos, and a distribution map for each regularly occurring species. Detailed species accounts describe key identification features, age-related plumages, status and distribution, subspecies, molt, habitats, behaviors, potential confusion species, and more.
Comprehensive and authoritative, The Crossley ID Guide: Raptors covers all thirty-four of North America’s diurnal raptor species (all species except owls). Each species is featured in stunning color plates that show males and females, in a full spectrum of ages and color variants, depicted near and far, in flight and at rest, and from multiple angles, all caught in their typical habitats. There are also comparative, multispecies scenes and mystery photographs that allow readers to test their identification skills, along with answers and full explanations in the back of the book. In addition, the book features an introduction, and thirty-four color maps accompany the plates.
The ultimate must-have guide for identifying migrant raptors, Hawks at a Distance is the first volume to focus on distant raptors as they are truly seen in the field. Jerry Liguori, a leading expert on North American raptors, factors in new information and approaches for identifying twenty-nine species of raptor in various lighting situations and settings. The field guide’s nineteen full-color portraits, 558 color photos, and 896 black-and-white images portray shapes and plumages for each species from all angles. Useful flight identification criteria are provided and the accompanying text discusses all aspects of in-flight hawk identification, including flight style and behavior. Concentrating on features that are genuinely observable at a distance, this concise and practical field guide is ideal for any aspiring or experienced hawk enthusiast.
Hawks from Every Angle takes hawk identification to new heights. It offers a fresh approach that literally looks at the birds from every angle, compares and contrasts deceptively similar species, and provides the pictures (and words) needed for identification in the field. Jerry Liguori pinpoints innovative, field-tested identification traits for each species from the various angles that they are seen. Featuring 339 striking color photos on 68 color plates and 32 black & white photos, this is a unique in presenting a host of meticulously crafted pictures for each of the 19 species it covers in detail–the species most common to migration sites throughout the United States and Canada.

You can also check out this sample raptor ID guide from The Crossley ID Guide: Raptors for a taste of what you’ll find in these publications.

Bird Fact Friday – Townsend’s Warbler

From pages 440-442 in The Warbler’s Guide:

Townsend’s Warbler is easily identified by its high-contrast yellow face, which also contains a dark ear patch and yellow undereye arc. These warblers have variably black throats boarded by yellow, and dark streaking. In addition, they have a dark olive-green back and white wing bars. Their dark flight feathers contrast with their yellow bodies. Additionally, Townsend’s Warblers are identified by their white bellies and tails. They also have a distinctive, contrasty facial pattern.

The Townsend Warbler (Setophaga townsendi) perched on a branch. Photo courtesy of the Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL. Copyright: Scott Whittle and Tom Stephenson.

This warbler breeds in conifers; during migration, they can use a range of habitats, but are often found in pines whenever available. Their breeding range overlaps with Hermit Warbler’s, and hybrids between the two are found annually. Townsend’s Warblers are typically found in the western part of the United States.

The Warbler GuideThe Warbler Guide
Tom Stephenson & Scott Whittle
Drawings by Catherine Hamilton

Warblers are among the most challenging birds to identify. They exhibit an array of seasonal plumages and have distinctive yet oft-confused calls and songs. The Warbler Guide enables you to quickly identify any of the 56 species of warblers in the United States and Canada. This groundbreaking guide features more than 1,000 stunning color photos, extensive species accounts with multiple viewing angles, and an entirely new system of vocalization analysis that helps you distinguish songs and calls.

The Warbler Guide revolutionizes birdwatching, making warbler identification easier than ever before. For more information, please see the author videos on the Princeton University Press website.

Bird Fact Friday – The Red Faced Warbler

From pages 422-424 of The Warbler Guide:

The Red Faced Warbler can be easily identified by its red face, throat and upper breast. It also has a black cap that extends down the sides of its head to create “earflaps”, a white belly, and a long gray tail that is often flipped or wagged. It also has a short, thick bill and a single white wing bar with a blackish edge. The Red Faced Warbler is the only U.S. warbler with a bright red face.

The Red Faced Warbler

The Red Faced Warbler (Cardellina rubrifrons) perched on a branch. Photo Credit: Michael H. Bruce

While feeding, the Red Faced Warbler tends to be acrobatic and hang from branches. It has a long, slender shape, and its pale white rump is clearly visible during flight. This warbler has a limited range and altitude but, in Arizona and New Mexico, it tends to prefer mixed forests and steep terrain, typically above 2000m.

warblerThe Warbler Guide
Tom Stephenson & Scott Whittle
Drawings by Catherine Hamilton

Warblers are among the most challenging birds to identify. They exhibit an array of seasonal plumages and have distinctive yet oft-confused calls and songs. The Warbler Guide enables you to quickly identify any of the 56 species of warblers in the United States and Canada. This groundbreaking guide features more than 1,000 stunning color photos, extensive species accounts with multiple viewing angles, and an entirely new system of vocalization analysis that helps you distinguish songs and calls.

The Warbler Guide revolutionizes birdwatching, making warbler identification easier than ever before. For more information, please see the author videos on the Princeton University Press website.