Bird Fact Friday – Which vulture’s head color varies with mood?

Lesser Yellow-headed
Vulture. Adult. Credit William S. Clark

From page 95 in Raptors of Mexico and Central America:

The Lesser Yellow-headed Vultures forage for carrion by gliding low over wet open areas and are able to locate carrion by smell as well as by sight. They also spend lots of time perched on the ground or on a low fence post. Active flight is with slow, deep, deliberate wing beats on flexible wings. They soar and glide with wings in a strong dihedral, often rocking or teetering from side to side, rarely soaring high. Adults’ head color varies with mood; the head is redder when the vulture is excited. Cathartid vultures often bow their wings downward in a flex until the tips almost meet.

Raptors of Mexico and Central America
William S. Clark & N. John Schmitt
With a foreword by Lloyd Kiff
Introduction | Sample Plate

Raptors are among the most challenging birds to identify in the field due to their bewildering variability of plumage, flight silhouettes, and behavior. Raptors of Mexico and Central America is the first illustrated guide to the region’s 69 species of raptors, including vagrants. It features 32 stunning color plates and 213 color photos, and a distribution map for each regularly occurring species. Detailed species accounts describe key identification features, age-related plumages, status and distribution, subspecies, molt, habitats, behaviors, potential confusion species, and more.

Raptors of Mexico and Central America is the essential field guide to this difficult bird group and the ideal travel companion for anyone visiting this region of the world.

Bird Fact Friday – How do long-winged harriers hunt prey?

From page 145 in Raptors of Mexico and Central America:

The Long-winged Harriers are typical harriers that hunt in low, slow flight just above the ground, pouncing on prey with a quick agile strike. They eat small mammals, small birds, frogs, lizards, and bird’s eggs. Some prey is located by hearing, enhanced by their owl-like facial disk. The Long-winged Harrier’s scientific name is Circus buffoniCircus is from the Greek kirkos, “circle,” from its habit of flying in circles. The species name,  buffoni, is for French naturalist George Louis Leclerc, Comte de Buffon.

Raptors of Mexico and Central America
William S. Clark & N. John Schmitt
With a foreword by Lloyd Kiff
Introduction | Sample Plate

Raptors are among the most challenging birds to identify in the field due to their bewildering variability of plumage, flight silhouettes, and behavior. Raptors of Mexico and Central America is the first illustrated guide to the region’s 69 species of raptors, including vagrants. It features 32 stunning color plates and 213 color photos, and a distribution map for each regularly occurring species. Detailed species accounts describe key identification features, age-related plumages, status and distribution, subspecies, molt, habitats, behaviors, potential confusion species, and more.

Raptors of Mexico and Central America is the essential field guide to this difficult bird group and the ideal travel companion for anyone visiting this region of the world.

Bird Fact Friday – Weekly Warbler: Black-throated Blue

From page 192-193 in The Warbler Guide:

Black-throated Blue Warbler, Fall Female, credit Scott Whittle

The female Black-throated Blue Warbler’s blue-green back and buffy undersides create a relatively low-contrast appearance. Its darker cheek creates a faint mask. Though from some angle, the mask can be very prominent. A small white “handkerchief” mark is created by white coloration at the base of the outer primaries. The Black-throated Blue Warbler is an active, understory forager, often seen near eye level. It frequently makes a loud, dry, “kissy” chip call while foraging in the fall. The Black-throated Blue Warbler is a good example of sexual dimorphism: the male and female are very different in color, although their body structure is the same.

 

 

The Warbler Guide
Tom Stephenson & Scott Whittle
Drawings by Catherine Hamilton
Warbler Guide App
Species Account Example: American Redstart Male

Warblers are amwarblerong the most challenging birds to identify. They exhibit an array of seasonal plumages and have distinctive yet oft-confused calls and songs. The Warbler Guide enables you to quickly identify any of the 56 species of warblers in the United States and Canada. This groundbreaking guide features more than 1,000 stunning color photos, extensive species accounts with multiple viewing angles, and an entirely new system of vocalization analysis that helps you distinguish songs and calls.

The Warbler Guide revolutionizes birdwatching, making warbler identification easier than ever before. For more information, please see the author videos on the Princeton University Press website.

Bird Fact Friday – Weekly Warbler: Blackpoll

From page 182-183 in The Warbler Guide:

The Blackpoll Warblers (fall birds) have yellowish throat and breast in contrast with the white lower belly. They have bold white wing bars, and distinct eyeline with broken eyering. The Blackpoll Warblers have contrasting tertial edging, and flight feathers white-edged on tips. Their streaking in sides and back is always present even when faint. Their long wings indicate a long-distance migrant: up to 7,000 miles each way—more than any other warbler.

The Warbler Guide
Tom Stephenson & Scott Whittle
Drawings by Catherine Hamilton
Warbler Guide App
Species Account Example: American Redstart Male

Warblers are amwarblerong the most challenging birds to identify. They exhibit an array of seasonal plumages and have distinctive yet oft-confused calls and songs. The Warbler Guide enables you to quickly identify any of the 56 species of warblers in the United States and Canada. This groundbreaking guide features more than 1,000 stunning color photos, extensive species accounts with multiple viewing angles, and an entirely new system of vocalization analysis that helps you distinguish songs and calls.

The Warbler Guide revolutionizes birdwatching, making warbler identification easier than ever before. For more information, please see the author videos on the Princeton University Press website.

Bird Fact Friday – Weekly Warbler: Common Yellowthroat

Common Yellowthroat, Spring Male, credit Scott Whittle

From page 254-255 in The Warbler Guide:

The Common Yellowthroat is one of our most widespread warblers. It is wren-like, and often skulks in marsh or low brush near water. It hops when on the ground, and it is frequently seen at or below eye level. The Common Yellowthroat has a small bill, a short neck and overall a plump appearance. It has short, rounded wings and a cocked tail in flight, and it is generally a weak flier. The adult male has a broad black mask across forehead and face, with paler border above, which is unique among warblers. When disturbed, it often pops up quickly, and then dives back down into cover. The Common Yellowthroats are the only U.S. and Canada warblers to nest in open marshes.

The Warbler Guide
Tom Stephenson & Scott Whittle
Drawings by Catherine Hamilton
Warbler Guide App
Species Account Example: American Redstart Male

Warblers are amwarblerong the most challenging birds to identify. They exhibit an array of seasonal plumages and have distinctive yet oft-confused calls and songs. The Warbler Guide enables you to quickly identify any of the 56 species of warblers in the United States and Canada. This groundbreaking guide features more than 1,000 stunning color photos, extensive species accounts with multiple viewing angles, and an entirely new system of vocalization analysis that helps you distinguish songs and calls.

The Warbler Guide revolutionizes birdwatching, making warbler identification easier than ever before. For more information, please see the author videos on the Princeton University Press website.

Bird Fact Friday – Weekly Warbler: Blackburnian

Blackburnian Warbler, Spring Male, credit Scott Whittle

From page 166-167 in The Warbler Guide:

The Blackburnian Warbler has fiery orange throat, face, and under-eye arc. Its auricular patch has distinctive triangular shape, pointed at rear and bottom. The Blackburnian Warbler has broad white wing patch, and two pale braces on back unique among warblers. Especially in a dim forest, the bright flash of a Blackburnian can be startling as they sally for insects. Blackburnians nest and are often found high in trees, but color often makes them quickly identifiable. Adult females in spring are not as bright orange as males. The Blackburnian Warbler is a long-distant migrant, and it has relatively long wings.

The Warbler Guide
Tom Stephenson & Scott Whittle
Drawings by Catherine Hamilton
Warbler Guide App
Species Account Example: American Redstart Male

Warblers are amwarblerong the most challenging birds to identify. They exhibit an array of seasonal plumages and have distinctive yet oft-confused calls and songs. The Warbler Guide enables you to quickly identify any of the 56 species of warblers in the United States and Canada. This groundbreaking guide features more than 1,000 stunning color photos, extensive species accounts with multiple viewing angles, and an entirely new system of vocalization analysis that helps you distinguish songs and calls.

The Warbler Guide revolutionizes birdwatching, making warbler identification easier than ever before. For more information, please see the author videos on the Princeton University Press website.

Bird Fact Friday – Weekly Warbler: Magnolia

Welcome back to the warblers!

Magnolia Warbler, Spring Male, credit Scott Whittle

As the warbler migration season approaches, we’re again highlighting some fun facts about the warblers with our Weekly Warbler feature. Kicking it off today is the Magnolia Warbler.

From page 340-341 in The Warbler Guide:

The Magnolia Warbler has bright yellow underparts and throat. Its tail pattern is unique and diagnostic—it has a black tail with broad white base. It often spreads tail, showing white tail spots very high in tail. The Magnolia Warbler has a black face mask with white eyebrow stripe and white under-eye arc. It is one of the three warblers that have a bright yellow rump (along with Yellow-rumped and Cape May). The Magnolia Warbler has a heavy black necklace that extends down sides. It is moderately active, usually in low to mid-story. During migration it is versatile, foraging in many habitats.

 

The Warbler Guide
Tom Stephenson & Scott Whittle
Drawings by Catherine Hamilton
Warbler Guide App
Species Account Example: American Redstart Male

Warblers are amwarblerong the most challenging birds to identify. They exhibit an array of seasonal plumages and have distinctive yet oft-confused calls and songs. The Warbler Guide enables you to quickly identify any of the 56 species of warblers in the United States and Canada. This groundbreaking guide features more than 1,000 stunning color photos, extensive species accounts with multiple viewing angles, and an entirely new system of vocalization analysis that helps you distinguish songs and calls.

The Warbler Guide revolutionizes birdwatching, making warbler identification easier than ever before. For more information, please see the author videos on the Princeton University Press website.

A new giveaway to get you ready for spring warbler migration

With the spring migration underway, take the opportunity to head to the field and watch these brightly colored neotropical migrants travel back north.

WarblerThe Warbler Guide is an essential resource for any warbler enthusiast, and the most comprehensive and user-friendly source for warbler information that makes warbler identification easier than ever.

Not feeling like carrying a book? PUP also offers many portable options. You can download the Warbler Guide App (now available for both Apple & Android devices) to get all the benefits of the book in the palm of your hand, plus many more app-only features. For example, with the rotatable 3D models that enable you to see a warbler from any angle, you can identify a warbler from the exact position you see it.

You can also download our FREE Quick Finders in pdf or jpg. Offering a quick snapshot of every North American species of warbler for side-by-side comparison, the Quick Finders sort warblers in a variety of ways to suit your needs.

WarblersIt’s also time for a new giveaway! Seven winners will receive a copy of the North American Warblers Fold-out Guide—a handy, pocket-sized foldout reference, with QR codes that take you to a range of common vocalizations for each species. Follow the directions below—the entry period ends April 20!

You can also check out Nicholas Lund’s tips and advices on birdwatching during spring migration, or check BirdCast for realtime bird forecasts that track the waves of migrants.

Armed with the most helpful tools and guides, you just might have your best spring birdwatching season ever!

 

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Bird Fact Friday – Why do birds sing?

From page 18 of Better Birding:

Songs differ from “calls” in that songs are longer, often more complex vocalizations. In most birds (though not all) songs are given by males, usually on the breeding territory, and serve the dual purpose of attracting females and driving away rival males. In some species both males and females sing. When females sing, it is less often about attracting males (though it probably does help strengthen pair bonds) and usually more about territorial defense against neighboring pairs. Often, the species in which females sing are less migratory or resident, so territories require year-round defense from rivals.

Better BirdingBetter Birding
Tips, Tools, and Concepts for the Field
George L. Armistead & Brian L. Sullivan
Introduction

Better Birding reveals the techniques expert birders use to identify a wide array of bird species in the field—quickly and easily. Featuring hundreds of stunning photos and composite plates throughout, this book simplifies identification by organizing the birds you see into groupings and offering strategies specifically tailored to each group. Skill building focuses not just on traditional elements such as plumage, but also on creating a context around each bird, including habitat, behavior, and taxonomy—parts so integral to every bird’s identity but often glossed over by typical field guides. Critical background information is provided for each group, enabling you to approach bird identification with a wide-angle view, using your eyes, brain, and binoculars more strategically, resulting in a more organized approach to learning birds.

Bird Fact Friday – What’s the best weather for peak hawk flights?

From page 10 in Hawks from Every Angle:

During spring, many peak flights occur ahead of a warm front, as birds heading north use southerly prevailing winds. Most fall flights occur after the passage of a cold front, when northerly winds that assist birds heading south are most prevalent. Geography, however, determines which specific wind directions will lead birds to each site. The most favorable winds for ridge sites are those that strike the ridge at an angle that produces optimal lift. At coastal and shoreline sites, optimal winds are those that “push” birds towards the shorelines. Even during snow squalls or light drizzle, optimal wind conditions can produce significant hawk flights.


hawksHawks from Every Angle
How to Identify Raptors In Flight
Jerry Liguori
Foreword by David A. Sibley

Identifying hawks in flight is a tricky business. Across North America, tens of thousands of people gather every spring and fall at more than one thousand known hawk migration sites—from New Jersey’s Cape May to California’s Golden Gate. Yet, as many discover, a standard field guide, with its emphasis on plumage, is often of little help in identifying those raptors soaring, gliding, or flapping far, far away. Hawks from Every Angle takes hawk identification to new heights. It offers a fresh approach that literally looks at the birds from every angle, compares and contrasts deceptively similar species, and provides the pictures (and words) needed for identification in the field. Jerry Liguori pinpoints innovative, field-tested identification traits for each species at the various angles that they are seen.

Featuring 339 striking color photos on 68 color plates and 32 black & white photos, Hawks from Every Angle is unique in presenting a host of meticulously crafted pictures for each of the 19 species it covers in detail—the species most common to migration sites throughout the United States and Canada. All aspects of raptor identification, including plumage, shape, and flight style traits, are discussed. For all birders who follow hawk migration and have found themselves wondering if the raptor in the sky does in fact match the one in the guide, Hawks from Every Angle—distilling an expert’s years of experience for the first time into a comprehensive array of truly useful photos and other pointers for each species—is quite simply a must.

Bird Fact Friday – The most loquacious geese

From page 235 in Waterfowl of North America, Europe, and Asia:

A snow goose can be very loquacious, even noisy, especially in flight, when taking off or landing. It produces loud, raucous, barking calls gwok or ga-ik, as well as other sounds more like those of grey geese, lower and hoarser: gung, wa-iir or hun-hrr. Large flocks utter these calls continuously and at different pitches, linked to the birds’ size.

Waterfowl of North America, Europe, and Asia
An Identification Guide
Sébastien Reeber

This is the ultimate guide for anyone who wants to identify the ducks, geese, and swans of North America, Europe, and Asia. With 72 stunning color plates (that include more than 920 drawings), over 650 superb photos, and in-depth descriptions, this book brings together the most current information on 84 species of Eurasian and North American waterfowl, and on more than 100 hybrids. The guide delves into taxonomy, identification features, determination of age and sex, geographic variations, measurements, voice, molt, and hybridization. In addition, the status of each species is treated with up-to-date details on distribution, population size, habitats, and life cycle. Color plates and photos are accompanied by informative captions and 85 distribution maps are also provided. Taken together, this is an unrivaled, must-have reference for any birder with an interest in the world’s waterfowl.

Bird Fact Friday – When habitat dictates behavior

From page 15 of Better Birding:

Habitat very often dictates behavior. A Northern Harrier glides and swoops low over fields and marshes, periodically flapping and hovering. It behaves this way because it hunts rodents and this kind of low, cruising flight allows it to more easily detect prey. A Harrier’s long wings allow it to pluck rodents cleanly from grassy cover. Harriers have evolved just so, to nimbly take advantage of these open habitats, including during migration. An appreciation of these qualities allows good birders to recognize a Harrier by its structure or movements from considerable distances. Species evolve to take best advantage of their environment.

Better BirdingBetter Birding
Tips, Tools, and Concepts for the Field
George L. Armistead & Brian L. Sullivan
Introduction

Better Birding reveals the techniques expert birders use to identify a wide array of bird species in the field—quickly and easily. Featuring hundreds of stunning photos and composite plates throughout, this book simplifies identification by organizing the birds you see into groupings and offering strategies specifically tailored to each group. Skill building focuses not just on traditional elements such as plumage, but also on creating a context around each bird, including habitat, behavior, and taxonomy—parts so integral to every bird’s identity but often glossed over by typical field guides. Critical background information is provided for each group, enabling you to approach bird identification with a wide-angle view, using your eyes, brain, and binoculars more strategically, resulting in a more organized approach to learning birds.