Bird Fact Friday – Radios & the New Zealand Storm-petrel

Adapted from pages 18-19 of Far From Land:

Attaching transmitting VHF radios to animals has occupied biologists since the late 1950s. It is a powerful technique for relocating, say, a troop of chimpanzees that assuredly will not have travelled far since their last known position. It is less useful for seabirds which travel far greater distances, taking them beyond the line of sight of any scientist deploying a receiving aerial on some windy clifftop. Couple this problem with the fact that a seabird will often dip into the trough below the wave crests or, even worse, submerge underwater, and the upshot is that VHF radio-telemetry has not transformed seabird research.

Believed extinct for over a century, the New Zealand Storm-petrel (Fregetta maoriana) was re-discovered in 2003. Subsequently, radio-tracked birds led scientists to a colony near Auckland. Illustrated by Bruce Pearson.

Those disparaging words notwithstanding, radio-telemetry has had its moments. In 2003, the ornithological world was amazed when the New Zealand Storm-petrel, thought extinct for over a century, was re-discovered at sea off New Zealand’s North Island. That led immediately to the question of the whereabouts of its colonies, and the tricky task of discovering those colonies. The problem was solved when it proved possible to attract the birds close to a 3.5 m inflatable with chum, the ornithologists’ term for a smelly sludge of fish bits. Once in range, the storm-petrels were captured by a small net fired over them. Fitted with  a transmitter weighing two-thirds of a gram, the released birds then led the searchers in 2013 to nesting burrows in the rainforests of Little Barrier Island, a mere 50 km from Auckland, New Zealand’s largest city.

Far From Land
Michael Brooke
With illustrations by Bruce Pearson

Seabirds evoke the spirit of the earth’s wildest places. They spend large portions of their lives at sea, often far from land, and nest on beautiful and remote islands that humans rarely visit. Thanks to the development of increasingly sophisticated and miniaturized devices that can track their every movement and behavior, it is now possible to observe the mysterious lives of these remarkable creatures as never before. This beautifully illustrated book takes you on a breathtaking journey around the globe to reveal where these birds actually go when they roam the sea, the tactics they employ to traverse vast tracts of ocean, the strategies they use to evade threats, and more.

Michael Brooke has visited every corner of the world in his lifelong pursuit of seabirds. Here, he draws on his own experiences and insights as well as the latest cutting-edge science to shed light on the elusive seafaring lives of albatrosses, frigatebirds, cormorants, and other ocean wanderers. Where do puffins go in the winter? How deep do penguins dive? From how far away can an albatross spot a fishing vessel worth following for its next meal? Brooke addresses these and other questions in this delightful book. Along the way, he reveals that seabirds are not the aimless wind-tossed creatures they may appear to be and explains the observational innovations that are driving this exciting area of research.

Featuring illustrations by renowned artist Bruce Pearson and packed with intriguing facts, Far from Land provides an extraordinary up-close look at the activities of seabirds.

Bird Fact Friday – Red-necked Phalaropes

Adapted from pages 60-62 of Far From Land:

Red-necked Phalaropes are charming small waders that spend the summer on northern tarns where, in a reversal of typical roles, the brighter females court a drabber male, lay a clutch, and then devolve all incubating duties onto him. Come winter and the phalaropes qualify as seabirds, spending their days in small flocks picking titbits from the surface. It had always been assumed that the small number of British phalaropes joined greater numbers of their kind from northern Russia to spend the winter in the seas south of Arabia, a known stronghold. By 2012, geolocators had become small enough to be attached safely to phalaropes, of which ten were duly tagged on the Shetland island of Fetlar. One was spotted back on Fetlar the following summer.

Birdwatchers were amazed when it was discovered that a tracked Red-necked Phalarope, breeding in the Shetland Isles, had spent the winter in the equatorial Pacific. Illustration by Bruce Pearson.

Malcie Smith, the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds’ Fetlar warden takes up the story. “We knew through experience that using a walk-in trap was almost always successful with incubating male phalaropes, so I was confident of success and, sure enough, we got our hands on his tag the following morning. We had a well-deserved dram of Scotland’s finest that night!

“There was a bit of a problem with having the data interpreted, with colleagues from the RSPB and the Swiss Ornithological Institute becoming involved in making sense of what was pretty messy data. I remember reading emails that included phrases like ‘impossible to interpret’ which was not encouraging. I was eventually given the ‘cleaned up’ details by email which nearly knocked me off my seat.”

The cause of Smith’s unseating was a track that took the bird west across the Atlantic from Shetland to Newfoundland. It then meandered along the eastern seaboard of North America, until crossing central America in mid-September. The next six winter months were spent in the eastern Pacific close to the Equator between continental Ecuador and the Galápagos Islands. Returning to Fetlar in spring, the phalarope more or less recapitulated its southbound route.

Since that study, further work has confirmed that phalaropes from Iceland and Greenland also winter in the Pacific while their fellow phalaropes breeding in northern Scandinavia do head to the Arabian Sea. Without question, this migratory split in the north-east Atlantic was wholly unanticipated.

Far From Land
Michael Brooke
With illustrations by Bruce Pearson

Seabirds evoke the spirit of the earth’s wildest places. They spend large portions of their lives at sea, often far from land, and nest on beautiful and remote islands that humans rarely visit. Thanks to the development of increasingly sophisticated and miniaturized devices that can track their every movement and behavior, it is now possible to observe the mysterious lives of these remarkable creatures as never before. This beautifully illustrated book takes you on a breathtaking journey around the globe to reveal where these birds actually go when they roam the sea, the tactics they employ to traverse vast tracts of ocean, the strategies they use to evade threats, and more.

Michael Brooke has visited every corner of the world in his lifelong pursuit of seabirds. Here, he draws on his own experiences and insights as well as the latest cutting-edge science to shed light on the elusive seafaring lives of albatrosses, frigatebirds, cormorants, and other ocean wanderers. Where do puffins go in the winter? How deep do penguins dive? From how far away can an albatross spot a fishing vessel worth following for its next meal? Brooke addresses these and other questions in this delightful book. Along the way, he reveals that seabirds are not the aimless wind-tossed creatures they may appear to be and explains the observational innovations that are driving this exciting area of research.

Featuring illustrations by renowned artist Bruce Pearson and packed with intriguing facts, Far from Land provides an extraordinary up-close look at the activities of seabirds.

Bird Fact Friday – the Magnificent Frigatebird

For the next month, Bird Fact Friday will be showcasing passages and illustrations from Far From Land, a forthcoming book that reveals the lives and activities of seabirds as you’ve never seen them before.

Adapted from pages 9 and 35 of the text:

[T]he five frigatebird species … are predominantly black. By way of sexual ornamentation, mature males have red throat pouches that can be inflated to attract females. Since their legs are tiny, frigatebirds are virtually unable to walk, but the reduced undercarriage and the large angular wings mean that their wing loading, the weight of bird supported by each square centimetre of wing surface, is the lowest of all birds. This gives them extreme agility, well displayed when they are chasing other seabirds, forcing them to regurgitate, and then catching the vomited spoils in mid-air before they splat into the sea.

The bare-skinned red throat of a male Magnificent Frigatebird is inflated to attract a mate. Illustration by Bruce Pearson.

The juvenile Great Frigatebirds hailed from Europa, a low atoll between Mozambique and Madagascar. For the first six months of flying life, the juveniles go to sea by day but return to land by night to be fed, normally by their mothers. Then the satellite-tracked young birds move north up the Somali coast, perhaps looking down on the region’s contemporary human pirates. The journeys are relaxed, around 450 km/day. The birds alternate periods of soaring in circles, attaining heights up to 3,000m, and periods of slow descent. While soaring, the frigatebirds do not flap their wings but rely on differences in air speed between different blocks of air to gain height, so-called dynamic soaring. Using this tactic, the young frigatebird remains in flight for up to two months at a stretch, sometimes even passing close to but not making landfall on the scattered islands of the Indian Ocean. Only occasionally is the pattern broken with land-based rests of a day or so on isolated islets of the Seychelles or Chagos archipelagoes. As the young birds pursue repeated clockwise circuits of the Doldrums of the central Indian Ocean for a year or more, it is an immensely leisurely entrée to independent life.


Far From Land

Michael Brooke
With illustrations by Bruce Pearson

Seabirds evoke the spirit of the earth’s wildest places. They spend large portions of their lives at sea, often far from land, and nest on beautiful and remote islands that humans rarely visit. Thanks to the development of increasingly sophisticated and miniaturized devices that can track their every movement and behavior, it is now possible to observe the mysterious lives of these remarkable creatures as never before. This beautifully illustrated book takes you on a breathtaking journey around the globe to reveal where these birds actually go when they roam the sea, the tactics they employ to traverse vast tracts of ocean, the strategies they use to evade threats, and more.

Michael Brooke has visited every corner of the world in his lifelong pursuit of seabirds. Here, he draws on his own experiences and insights as well as the latest cutting-edge science to shed light on the elusive seafaring lives of albatrosses, frigatebirds, cormorants, and other ocean wanderers. Where do puffins go in the winter? How deep do penguins dive? From how far away can an albatross spot a fishing vessel worth following for its next meal? Brooke addresses these and other questions in this delightful book. Along the way, he reveals that seabirds are not the aimless wind-tossed creatures they may appear to be and explains the observational innovations that are driving this exciting area of research.

Featuring illustrations by renowned artist Bruce Pearson and packed with intriguing facts, Far from Land provides an extraordinary up-close look at the activities of seabirds.

Bird Fact Friday – Greater Honeyguide

Adapted from page 112 of Birds of the Masai Mara:

The Greater Honeyguide is a vocal bird found in light, open woodland. You are likely to hear these birds making their repeated, telephone-like, territorial call “wheet-too” well before you see them. The first view is usually a good look at their distinctive behinds as they fly off. The flash of white in the outer tail feathers is common to honeyguides – but be wary of Klaas’s Cuckoo which shares the same feature. The basic plumage of this species is grey below and dull brown above, but the sexes and immature birds can be told apart: males show a black throat and white cheeks; females do not; while immature birds have a bright lemon-yellow wash to the throat and breast and a blue eye-ring.

An adult, male Greater Honeyguide. Photo credit: Adam Scott Kennedy

Both sexes call a soft rattle which lures people and Honey Badgers to bee colonies, where both parties get to enjoy the spoils. Like cuckoos, honeyguides are brood-parasites, laying their eggs in other birds’ nests for the host family to raise. However, honeyguides target different species, specializing in tree-hole nesters such as barbets and woodpeckers.

To see what an immature Greater Honeyguide looks like, head to our Instagram.

Birds of the Masai Mara
By Adam Scott Kennedy

Birds of the Masai Mara is a remarkably beautiful photographic guide featuring the bird species likely to be encountered by visitors to the popular Masai Mara National Reserve in Kenya. With an eye-catching layout, easy-to-use format, and no-jargon approach, the book contains more than 300 stunning photographs covering over 200 species of birds and is accessible and informative, rather than purely identification-based. A handy, brief introduction provides visitors with background on the habitats of the national park, and the guide’s habitat-based approach makes it simple to identify any bird species according to where it is found. Based on the firsthand experiences of the author, Birds of the Masai Mara is an ideal companion to all those visiting the national reserve and to bird aficionados interested in learning more about the region.

  • The only photographic guide to focus solely on the bird species of the Masai Mara National Reserve
  • More than 300 remarkable photographs covering over 200 species
  • Accessible text explores bird species behavior and species etymology
  • A brief and handy introduction examines the habitats of the Masai Mara
  • Easy-to-use habitat-based layout makes exciting birdwatching easy

First published in 2012.

Browse Our 2018 Birds & Natural History Catalog

Our new Birds & Natural History catalog includes the most comprehensive field guides to North American birds of prey ever published, an in-depth look at the most poisonous plants on earth, and a book that follows birds around the globe to reveal where they actually go when they roam the sea.

If you’re attending the Space Coast Birding and Wildlife Festival in Titusville, FL, stop by Booth #59 for our full range of Birds & Natural History titles and more.

Written and lavishly illustrated with stunning, lifelike paintings by leading field-guide illustrator, photographer, and author Brian Wheeler, Birds of Prey of the East and Birds of Prey of the West depict an enormous range of variations of age, sex, color, and plumage, and feature a significant amount of plumage data that has never been published before. The painted figures illustrate plumage and species comparisons in a classic field-guide layout. Each species is shown in the same posture and from the same viewpoint, which further assists comparisons. Facing-page text includes quick-reference identification points and brief natural history accounts that incorporate the latest information. The range maps are exceptionally accurate and much larger than those in other guides. They plot the most up-to-date distribution information for each species and include the location of cities for more accurate reference. Finally, the guides feature color habitat photographs next to the maps. The result sets a new standard for guides to North America’s birds of prey.

Featuring hundreds of color photos and diagrams throughout, Plants That Kill explains how certain plants evolved toxicity to deter herbivores and other threats and sheds light on their physiology and the biochemistry involved in the production of their toxins. It discusses the interactions of poisonous plants with other organisms–particularly humans—and explores the various ways plant toxins can target the normal functioning of bodily systems in mammals, from the effects of wolfsbane on the heart to toxins that cause a skin reaction when combined with the sun’s rays. This intriguing book also looks at plants that can harm you only if your exposure to them is prolonged, the ethnobotany of poisons throughout human history, and much more.

Michael Brooke has visited every corner of the world in his lifelong pursuit of seabirds. Here, he draws on his own experiences and insights as well as the latest cutting-edge science to shed light on the elusive seafaring lives of albatrosses, frigatebirds, cormorants, and other ocean wanderers. Where do puffins go in the winter? How deep do penguins dive? From how far away can an albatross spot a fishing vessel worth following for its next meal? Brooke addresses these and other questions in this delightful book. Along the way, he reveals that seabirds are not the aimless wind-tossed creatures they may appear to be and explains the observational innovations that are driving this exciting area of research.

Featuring illustrations by renowned artist Bruce Pearson and packed with intriguing facts, Far from Land provides an extraordinary up-close look at the activities of seabirds.

Bird Fact Friday – The Barn Swallow

Adapted from page 160 of Birds of the Masai Mara:

The Barn Swallow is a blue swallow with a red throat and pale belly. Familiar to many visitors from outside of Kenya, the Barn Swallow is among the most cosmopolitan of all bird species. It is a common migrant to the Mara between September and April, but stragglers have been recorded in all months of the year.

The Barn Swallow, mid flight. Photo credit: Adam Scott Kennedy.

In flight, it appears glossy-blue above and cream-coloured on the belly. When perched, good views of the velvet-red throat and blue breast-band help to separate it from the Angola Swallow, which is a less frequent visitor to the Mara. That species shows a reddish-orange throat, light dusky-grey underparts, and lacks the blue breastband. Young Barn Swallows are less strongly marked than adults and lack the long tail streamers of birds in breeding plumage (as do many adults that arrive into Kenya from September onwards).

Birds of the Masai Mara
By Adam Scott Kennedy

Birds of the Masai Mara is a remarkably beautiful photographic guide featuring the bird species likely to be encountered by visitors to the popular Masai Mara National Reserve in Kenya. With an eye-catching layout, easy-to-use format, and no-jargon approach, the book contains more than 300 stunning photographs covering over 200 species of birds and is accessible and informative, rather than purely identification-based. A handy, brief introduction provides visitors with background on the habitats of the national park, and the guide’s habitat-based approach makes it simple to identify any bird species according to where it is found. Based on the firsthand experiences of the author, Birds of the Masai Mara is an ideal companion to all those visiting the national reserve and to bird aficionados interested in learning more about the region.

  • The only photographic guide to focus solely on the bird species of the Masai Mara National Reserve
  • More than 300 remarkable photographs covering over 200 species
  • Accessible text explores bird species behavior and species etymology
  • A brief and handy introduction examines the habitats of the Masai Mara
  • Easy-to-use habitat-based layout makes exciting birdwatching easy

First published in 2012.

Bird Fact Friday — the Slender-tailed Nightjar

Adapted from page 164 of Birds of Masai Mara:

The Slender-tailed Nightjar is an amazingly camouflaged nocturnal bird of open acacia areas. A good local guide may know where to find one roosting on the ground during the day. They become easier to see as they rise to hawk for insects at dusk and dawn, sometimes coming to feed on moths at the lights of lodges and camps, when it looks like a falcon or a large swift.

Do you spot the Slender-tailed Nightjar in the photo?

This is the most abundant of the nine species of nightjar resident in the Mara, and hence it is the one you are most likely to encounter when visiting the area. At night, listen out for its monotonous call which is similar to a car alarm “we-we-we-we-we…”; in flight, its call is a squeaky “wik-wik-ik”.

Birds of the Masai Mara
By Adam Scott Kennedy

Birds of the Masai Mara is a remarkably beautiful photographic guide featuring the bird species likely to be encountered by visitors to the popular Masai Mara National Reserve in Kenya. With an eye-catching layout, easy-to-use format, and no-jargon approach, the book contains more than 300 stunning photographs covering over 200 species of birds and is accessible and informative, rather than purely identification-based. A handy, brief introduction provides visitors with background on the habitats of the national park, and the guide’s habitat-based approach makes it simple to identify any bird species according to where it is found. Based on the firsthand experiences of the author, Birds of the Masai Mara is an ideal companion to all those visiting the national reserve and to bird aficionados interested in learning more about the region.

  • The only photographic guide to focus solely on the bird species of the Masai Mara National Reserve
  • More than 300 remarkable photographs covering over 200 species
  • Accessible text explores bird species behavior and species etymology
  • A brief and handy introduction examines the habitats of the Masai Mara
  • Easy-to-use habitat-based layout makes exciting birdwatching easy

First published in 2012.

Bird Fact Friday – The Snowy Sheathbill

Adapted from page 190-191 of Antarctic Wildlife:

The Snowy Sheathbill is a chunky, broad-winged, short-billed, short-tailed bird that recalls a pigeon, particularly in its rapid flight. It has entirely white plumage, with pink facial skin, a yellow-grey bill and dark grey legs. Juveniles are similar, but have a smaller facial wattle. The combination of behaviour, habitat, shape and plumage render this remarkable bird unmistakable.

Watching this ugly yet endearing bird provides great amusement. Snowy Sheathbills are hyperactive, walking rapidly yet clumsily through penguin colonies and across open ground. They are very tame and inquisitive, regularly approaching human visitors and even investigating their clothing and gear on the off chance that they contain illicit foodstuffs. This species is fond of flying out to ships and perching on zodiacs, often balancing on one leg. A gregarious bird, squabbling groups sometimes utter a crow-like “caw ”.

The Snowy Sheathbill (Chionis albus) take their English name from the bony casing (sheath) in which the bill is encased, rather like a sword in its scabbard.

Sheathbills are the ‘cleaners’ of seal and penguin colonies, playing a vital ecological role. Perhaps the ultimate in sheathbill grossness was the individual watched devouring a tapeworm that had just been ejected from a Chinstrap Penguin’s intestine. However, having them around is a mixed blessing for penguins as they are also cunning confidence tricksters. Pairs work together to distract adult penguins feeding their chicks with regurgitated krill. One sheathbill pecks at a penguin until it spills the meal, at which point its partner leaps in and grabs the prize – and sheathbills are not averse to seizing unguarded eggs.

Sheathbills are remarkable for several reasons. Among their many claims to fame, the Sheathbill family (Chionidae) is the only bird family that breeds solely on Antarctica. Sheathbills are, however, the only regularly occurring Antarctic bird that does not have webbed feet, so they avoid contact with water.


Antarctic Wildlife: A Visitor’s Guide
By James Lowen

Antarctic Wildlife is the definitive identification guide to the birds and marine mammals of the Antarctic Peninsula, Drake Passage, and Beagle Channel. This easy-to-use photographic field guide enables visitors to this unique region of the world–newcomer and seasoned traveler alike–to identify with confidence the penguins, whales, seals, seabirds, and other stunning wildlife they encounter on their journey. Full-color photographs show typical views of each species of bird or marine mammal, together with the terrestrial plants likely to be seen. Detailed species accounts describe key identification features, give tips on where to look, and highlight interesting facts. This one-of-a-kind guide also includes introductory chapters that cover the wildlife of each Antarctic environment by season, as well as information on tourism and Antarctic cruising that will help visitors get the most from their trip.

Antarctic Wildlife is a must-have photographic guide for travelers taking the standard cruise from Ushuaia, Argentina, to the great white continent, and for anyone interested in the diverse wildlife found in this remote part of the world.

  • Covers the wildlife of the Antarctic Peninsula, Drake Passage, and Beagle Channel
  • Features full-color photographs throughout
  • Describes key identification features and gives tips on where to look
  • Includes an introduction to Antarctic environments and information on Antarctic cruising

Bird Fact Friday – Antarctica’s Crested Duck

Adapted from page 90 of Antarctic Wildlife:

The Crested Duck is a large brown and buff duck with a shaggy crest and dark eye-mask found along the Beagle Channel. These ducks are almost always seen in pairs, and only rarely gathers in flocks. They feed quietly on or by the shoreline, usually in pairs or family parties. Plumage is mid-brown with large buff blotches on flanks and scapulars, with a paler brown-grey color on head, which highlights their dark brown eye-mask and crown sides. Their long, droopy crest is often held flat against the rear of their head. At close range, their flaming red eye is striking.

A Crested Duck (Lophonetta specularioides) is usually about 50-55 cm in length.

In flight, the white trailing-edge contrasts with their otherwise blackish wings, and a small chestnut-purple panel in the centre of each wing sometimes catches the light. Instead of migrating north to milder climes, Crested Ducks see out the harsh Patagonian winter by moving to sheltered spots on unfrozen waters.

Antarctic Wildlife: A Visitor’s Guide
By James Lowen

Antarctic Wildlife is the definitive identification guide to the birds and marine mammals of the Antarctic Peninsula, Drake Passage, and Beagle Channel. This easy-to-use photographic field guide enables visitors to this unique region of the world–newcomer and seasoned traveler alike–to identify with confidence the penguins, whales, seals, seabirds, and other stunning wildlife they encounter on their journey. Full-color photographs show typical views of each species of bird or marine mammal, together with the terrestrial plants likely to be seen. Detailed species accounts describe key identification features, give tips on where to look, and highlight interesting facts. This one-of-a-kind guide also includes introductory chapters that cover the wildlife of each Antarctic environment by season, as well as information on tourism and Antarctic cruising that will help visitors get the most from their trip.

Antarctic Wildlife is a must-have photographic guide for travelers taking the standard cruise from Ushuaia, Argentina, to the great white continent, and for anyone interested in the diverse wildlife found in this remote part of the world.

  • Covers the wildlife of the Antarctic Peninsula, Drake Passage, and Beagle Channel
  • Features full-color photographs throughout
  • Describes key identification features and gives tips on where to look
  • Includes an introduction to Antarctic environments and information on Antarctic cruising

 

Bird Fact Friday — the White-browed Robin Chat

From page 134 of Birds of the Masai Mara:

The White-browed Robin Chat is a thrush-sized bird with a grey back and orange underparts. Common in lodge and camp gardens where there are large and scattered trees and lush undergrowth, the White-browed Robin Chat is generally a retiring bird, but can be easily tamed. With its striking head-pattern, bright underparts and burnt-orange tail in flight, this bird is easily recognised.

A White-browed Robin Chat (Cossypha heuglini). Photo credit: Adam Scott Kennethdy.

The cyclical song starts quietly but increases in volume and pace. Pairs will often engage in powerful duets, especially when rival pairs are nearby, and the noise can be deafening. It is common to see this bird feeding its young, which are similar to the adults but heavily spotted and lack the strong face pattern. If you are very lucky, you may also see adults feeding a dark, heavily barred fledgling that is far larger than itself – this will be a juvenile Red-chested Cuckoo, a species that routinely lays its eggs in robin chat nests.

Birds of the Masai Mara
By Adam Scott Kennedy

Birds of the Masai Mara is a remarkably beautiful photographic guide featuring the bird species likely to be encountered by visitors to the popular Masai Mara National Reserve in Kenya. With an eye-catching layout, easy-to-use format, and no-jargon approach, the book contains more than 300 stunning photographs covering over 200 species of birds and is accessible and informative, rather than purely identification-based. A handy, brief introduction provides visitors with background on the habitats of the national park, and the guide’s habitat-based approach makes it simple to identify any bird species according to where it is found. Based on the firsthand experiences of the author, Birds of the Masai Mara is an ideal companion to all those visiting the national reserve and to bird aficionados interested in learning more about the region.

  • The only photographic guide to focus solely on the bird species of the Masai Mara National Reserve
  • More than 300 remarkable photographs covering over 200 species
  • Accessible text explores bird species behavior and species etymology
  • A brief and handy introduction examines the habitats of the Masai Mara
  • Easy-to-use habitat-based layout makes exciting birdwatching easy

First published in 2012.

 

 

Bird Fact Friday — The Variegated Fairywren

It’s Black Bird Fact Friday, so let’s celebrate with a look at another beautiful bird.

From page 230 of Birds of Australia:

Australia’s most widespread fairywren. Like males of several other fairywrens, the male Variegated has a blue crown contiguous with a pointed blue ear patch, a black throat and upper breast, a white lower breast, and a large chestnut shoulder patch. The blue markings are not uniform and have a bright, shimmering iridescent quality. There are distinct subspecies, which differ in the intensity of the blue crown colour. The males can be separated from those of Lovely, Blue-breasted, and Red-winged Fairywrens by the light blue edges at the sides of the breast, lacking in those species.

A female Variegated Fairywren (Malurus lamberti). Photo credit: Geoff Jones.

Females differmuch more among subspecies; over most of Australia they are sandy brown above and buff below, with a white-tipped blue tail and chestnut lores and eye rings that create a masked appearance. Superb Fairywren females differ in lacking a fine white tip to the tail. Variegated females from Arnhem Land (NT) and the Kimberley region (WA) are white below and have black wings and beautiful powder-blue upperparts. Small groups of this common bird generally favour undergrowth and clearings within habitats such as open woodlands, eucalypt forests, mallee, mulga, and even rainforest edges in e.Australia. Variegated is found all over mainland Australia except the s. and n. extremities.

Birds of Australia
By Iain Campbell, Sam Woods & Nick Leseberg
With photography by Geoff Jones

Australia is home to a spectacular diversity of birdlife, from parrots and penguins to emus and vibrant passerines. Birds of Australia covers all 714 species of resident birds and regularly occurring migrants and features more than 1,100 stunning color photographs, including many photos of subspecies and plumage variations never before seen in a field guide. Detailed facing-page species accounts describe key identification features such as size, plumage, distribution, behavior, and voice. This one-of-a-kind guide also provides extensive habitat descriptions with a large number of accompanying photos. The text relies on the very latest IOC taxonomy and the distribution maps incorporate the most current mapping data, making this the most up-to-date guide to Australian birds.

  • Covers all 714 species of resident birds and regularly occurring migrants
  • Features more than 1,100 stunning color photos
  • Includes facing-page species accounts, habitat descriptions, and distribution maps
  • The ideal photographic guide for beginners and seasoned birders alike

Bird Fact Friday — Red-Rumped Parrot

From page 194 of Birds of Australia:

The male Red-Rumped Parrot is a bright green parrot with a red rump, lemon-yellow belly and vent, and a subtle blue wash on the shoulder and forehead. It is told from male Mulga Parrot by its lack of red on the nape and vent and absence of a yellow shoulder patch. Females are dull brownish-green with little colour except some green on the rump. The lack of any strong shoulder mark or reddish nape patch separates this species from female Mulga Parrot.

A male Red-Rumped Parrot (Psephotus haematonotus)

Red-rumped parrot is most likely to be found in pairs or small flocks. It readily perches in the open, is often conspicuous and approachable, and is more regularly found around country towns than Mulga Parrot. Red-rumped is a common species of the south-east, where it occurs in farmlands with scattered trees and grassy and other open woodlands, often around watercourses.

Birds of Australia
By Iain Campbell, Sam Woods & Nick Leseberg
With photography by Geoff Jones

Australia is home to a spectacular diversity of birdlife, from parrots and penguins to emus and vibrant passerines. Birds of Australia covers all 714 species of resident birds and regularly occurring migrants and features more than 1,100 stunning color photographs, including many photos of subspecies and plumage variations never before seen in a field guide. Detailed facing-page species accounts describe key identification features such as size, plumage, distribution, behavior, and voice. This one-of-a-kind guide also provides extensive habitat descriptions with a large number of accompanying photos. The text relies on the very latest IOC taxonomy and the distribution maps incorporate the most current mapping data, making this the most up-to-date guide to Australian birds.

  • Covers all 714 species of resident birds and regularly occurring migrants
  • Features more than 1,100 stunning color photos
  • Includes facing-page species accounts, habitat descriptions, and distribution maps
  • The ideal photographic guide for beginners and seasoned birders alike