Bird Fact Friday — The Spinifex Pigeon

From page 62 of Birds of Australia:

A handsome, reddish inland species, Spinifex Pigeon is mostly ruddy-coloured and has a pointed rufous topknot and a striking face pattern: Bare red skin surrounds a pale eye, and the face is striped black and white, with some subtle blue markings too. Bold black bars are spread across the wings and sides of the mantle, and some subspecies also show a bold white bar across the chest. It is inconspicuous when it forages on the ground, and is well camoufl aged, as its reddish colouration mirrors the red dirt and the rocky outcrops within the arid landscapes it inhabits: rocky and hilly areas and spinifex grasslands within the north of the Outback.

The Spinifex Pigeon (Geophaps plumifera) is typically 7.5-9 inches tall.

It occurs patchily within the NT, c. and n. WA, far w. QLD, and far n. SA. Spinifex Pigeon is never far from water in its arid environment, and is therefore best located around shrinking water sources late in the dry season, when these nomadic birds become more concentrated.

Birds of Australia
By Iain Campbell, Sam Woods & Nick Leseberg
With photography by Geoff Jones

Australia is home to a spectacular diversity of birdlife, from parrots and penguins to emus and vibrant passerines. Birds of Australia covers all 714 species of resident birds and regularly occurring migrants and features more than 1,100 stunning color photographs, including many photos of subspecies and plumage variations never before seen in a field guide. Detailed facing-page species accounts describe key identification features such as size, plumage, distribution, behavior, and voice. This one-of-a-kind guide also provides extensive habitat descriptions with a large number of accompanying photos. The text relies on the very latest IOC taxonomy and the distribution maps incorporate the most current mapping data, making this the most up-to-date guide to Australian birds.

  • Covers all 714 species of resident birds and regularly occurring migrants
  • Features more than 1,100 stunning color photos
  • Includes facing-page species accounts, habitat descriptions, and distribution maps
  • The ideal photographic guide for beginners and seasoned birders alike

 

 

Bird Fact Friday – How do birds produce such varied songs?

From page 12 of Birds of South America: Passerines:

Have you ever stopped to notice the beauty of birdsong? It turns out birds are built for singing! Birds produce sound in the syrinx (as opposed to the larynx, where humans and other mammals produce sound) located deep in their chests where the trachea splits into two bronchi. Many birds can produce sound in both bronchi, making it possible for them to produce two notes at once. No wonder they have so much range!

Birds of South AmericaBirds of South America: Passerines
Ber van Perlo
Sample Entry

This comprehensive field guide to the birds of South America covers all 1,952 passerine species to be found south of Panama, including offshore islands such as Trinidad, the Galapagos, and the Falklands, and the islands of the Scotia Arc leading to the Antarctic mainland. It features 197 stunning color plates and detailed species accounts that describe key identification features, habitat, songs, and calls. All plumages for each species are illustrated, including males, females, and juveniles. This easy-to-use guide is the essential travel companion for experienced birdwatchers and novice birders alike.

Bird Fact Friday – Albatross

From page 26 of Offshore Sea Life ID Guide: West Coast:

The Black-footed Albatross is common offshore from spring to fall and uncommon in the winter. It often follows boats and scavenges. It is dark overall with a white noseband and a dusky bill. Older adults have white tail coverts; some birds bleach to whitish on their head and neck. It breeds in November and December, mostly in Hawaii.

Offshore Sea Life ID Guide: West Coast
Steve N.G. Howell & Brian L. Sullivan
Introduction

k10465Two-thirds of our planet lies out of sight of land, just offshore beyond the horizon. What wildlife might you find out there? And how might you identify what you see? This Offshore Sea Life ID Guide, designed for quick use on day trips off the West Coast, helps you put a name to what you see, from whales and dolphins to albatrosses, turtles, and even flyingfish. Carefully crafted color plates show species as they typically appear at sea, and expert text highlights identification features. This user-friendly field guide is essential for anyone going out on a whale-watching or birding trip, and provides a handy gateway to the wonders of the ocean.

• First state-of-the-art pocket guide to offshore sea life
• Over 300 photos used to create composite plates
• Includes whales, dolphins, sea lions, birds, sharks, turtles, flyingfish, and more
• Accessible and informative text reveals what to look for
• Great for beginners and experts alike

Bird Fact Friday – Rose-Crowned Fruit Dove

From the Pigeons and Doves section of Birds of Australia:

Rose Crowned Fruit Dove

© Birds of Australia, Pg. 69

The Rose-crowned Fruit Dove can be found in tropical areas, particularly within monsoon vine forests. It spends its time in the canopy of fruiting trees where it makes soft cooing calls. Despite it’s beautiful plumage, it’s hard to spot because of it’s size, it’s ability to blend in, and the fact that it tends to stay in one place for long stretches of time.

Birds of Australia: A Photographic Guide
Iain Campbell, Sam Woods & Nick Leseberg
Photography by Geoff Jones
Introduction
Sample Entry

k10338Australia is home to a spectacular diversity of birdlife, from parrots and penguins to emus and vibrant passerines. Birds of Australia covers all 714 species of resident birds and regularly occurring migrants and features more than 1,100 stunning color photographs, including many photos of subspecies and plumage variations never before seen in a field guide. Detailed facing-page species accounts describe key identification features such as size, plumage, distribution, behavior, and voice. This one-of-a-kind guide also provides extensive habitat descriptions with a large number of accompanying photos. The text relies on the very latest IOC taxonomy and the distribution maps incorporate the most current mapping data, making this the most up-to-date guide to Australian birds.
• Covers all 714 species of resident birds and regularly occurring migrants
• Features more than 1,100 stunning color photos
• Includes facing-page species accounts, habitat descriptions, and distribution maps
• The ideal photographic guide for beginners and seasoned birders alike