Bird Fact Friday– Black-tailed Godwit

For the next five weeks, David Lindo – author of How to Be an Urban Birder – will take over our Bird Fact Friday series. Check out these posts every week to learn about the different birds he’s encountered in his travels through the Concrete Jungle. In his first entry, he highlights the Black-tailed Godwit.

Photo credit: David Lindo

This elegant species is a member of the strongly migratory Limosa genus of the wader family. There are three other species in the Godwit family: the Bar-tailed, Hudsonian and Marbled. The latter two species are restricted to the Americas. Although the Hudsonian Godwit has turned up in the UK a few times the Marbled, which is also the world’s largest godwit, is yet to make footfall on British mud.

Black-tailed Godwits are currently Red Listed in the UK and is a very rare re-colonised breeding bird. They once regularly nested across large parts of Britain but draining of the fenland habitat that they favoured plus, the over-harvesting by bird catchers coupled with their reputation as being good for the table led to their demise. They returned to East Anglia as breeders as recently as 1952.

The Islandic race islandica individuals are quite distinctive. This race tends to be brighter brick-red around the neck and underparts and on migration they tend to end up in Portugal.

How to Be an Urban Birder
By David Lindo

Urban birding is fast becoming ornithology’s new rock ’n’ roll. Birds and birding have never been cooler—and urban birding is at the cutting edge.

How to Be an Urban Birder is the world’s first guide to the art of urban birding—which is so easy and great fun! Here, urban birding pioneer David Lindo tells you everything you need to know about birds and birding in towns and cities in the UK.

  • Includes a brief history of urban birding in the UK
  • Covers the best places to look for birds in towns and cities
  • Helps you get to know your urban birds
  • Gives useful tips on how to attract birds to your garden
  • Explains what gear you need and how to go about being an urban birde
  • Features hundreds of cool images and illustrations of birds in urban settings

 

Bird Fact Friday – the Lesser Black-Backed Gull

Adapted from pages 266 to 273 of Gulls of the World:

The Lesser Black-Backed Gull is a four-year gull, and resembles a dark-backed, more slender version of Herring Gull, with rounder head and slightly thinner bill that appears less blunt-tipped and slightly drooping. They have long, slender wings are often held lowered when relaxed. Their head and underbody is whitish with dark streaking to mottling and dark eye-mask, while their central hindbelly and vent may lack dark spotting. The darkest of these birds have rather uniform brown head and underbody. Meanwhile, their upperwing is dark brown with blackish flight feathers, only rarely with indication of paler inner webs to inner primaries. They have two solid dark wing-bars, formed by blackish centres to greater coverts and secondaries, and an underwing that is blackish-brown to barred grey-brown in contrast to paler flight feathers. Finally, their rump is white with dense dark spotting reaching upper mantle as slight paler wedge against darker scapulars, and their tail is black with narrow white bases and spots along edges of t6; sometimes with more extensive white at base and narrower black tail-bar.

A gull

An adult Lesser Black-Backed Gull (intermedius). It’s a rather dark individual
with blackish upperparts, almost concolorous with wing-tip. Photographed by the author in Copenhagen, Denmark.

In flight, they are dark enough to be mistaken at range for juvenile skua (especially Pomarine, which is similar in size and dark overall plumage). The majority retain juvenile plumage in first part of autumn, unlike Yellow-legged, Caspian and many Herring Gulls, which from Sep have renewed mantle and scapulars and have slightly worn coverts. They breed colonially along coasts and on islands, locally on islands in lakes and rivers, on moors and on buildings.

There was a large increase since the 1940s with the extension of breeding range from 1920, so it is able to manage competition with Herring Gull. Since the 1990s, they have been breeding in Greenland; they probably also breed in North America, where scarce visitors to East Canada and USA. Most of the European population is migratory, but some remain near breeding sites to winter in milder parts of West Europe. Birds leave breeding sites from late July, with several stops during southward journey. Most winters are spent in the West Mediterranean and Atlantic coastline between the South Iberian peninsula and Mauritania, with some reaching southwards to interior West Africa and Gulf of Guinea coasts.

Gulls of the World
By Klaus Malling Olsen

With more than 50 gull species in the world, this family of seabirds poses some of the greatest field identification challenges of any bird group: age-related plumage changes, extensive variations within species, frequent hybridization, and complex distribution. 

Gulls of the World takes on these challenges and is the first book to provide a comprehensive look at these birds. Concise text emphasizes field identification, with in-depth discussion of variations as well as coverage of habitat, status, and distribution. Abundant photographs highlight identification criteria and, crucially, factor in age and subspecific field separation. Informative species accounts are accompanied by detailed color range maps.

Gulls of the World is the most authoritative photographic guide to this remarkable bird family.

  • The first book to provide in-depth coverage of all the world’s gull species
  • More than 600 stunning color photographs
  • Concise text looks at variations, habitat, status, and distribution
  • Informative species accounts and color range maps

 

 

 

Bird Fact Friday— Mediterranean Gull

Adapted from pages 68-71 of Gulls of the World:

The Mediterranean Gull is a three-year gull. They are medium-sized and compact with large squarish head, a deep parallel-edged bill with drooping tip, dark eyes and long legs. The largest males of this species are almost size of Common Gull and have the heaviest bills. Meanwhile, the smallest females are Black-headed Gull-sized with shorter, stubby bills. Settled birds look stocky with long legs; when relaxed, often appear compact and neckless with flat back. Swimming birds sit high on water.

In flight, these gulls are full-bodied with a short neck, ‘well-fed’ belly and shortish-looking wings, appearing rounded and in adults very pale. Flight with stiffer wing-beats than Black-headed and Common Gulls, somewhat recalling that of small egrets (particularly in the case of palewinged adults). May feed with short dips, but will also chase flying insects like Black-headed Gull.

A Mediterranean Gull.

Their most common call is a mellow yelping ee-ar or yee-ah, slightly reminiscent of male  Eurasian Wigeon Anas penelope, or small barking dog.

These gulls nest along coasts and lagoons with sparse vegetation, generally avoiding barren sand. They breed mainly from Black Sea region westwards; extension of breeding range from 1940s to scattered regions of S Europe northwards to Denmark and westwards to southern England.

Migration takes place mainly coastal with large concentrations around W Black Sea in September before leaving for winter quarters in S Black Sea and Mediterranean. Most of W European population gathers in N France following breeding season. They are regular visitors to Europe north of breeding range. Vagrant to Iceland, Norway, Finland, Estonia, Latvia, Macaronesia, Africa S to Senegal, The Gambia and Kenya, and Jordan, Iraq, Arabian Gulf and Kazakhstan.

Gulls of the World
By Klaus Malling Olsen

With more than 50 gull species in the world, this family of seabirds poses some of the greatest field identification challenges of any bird group: age-related plumage changes, extensive variations within species, frequent hybridization, and complex distribution. 

Gulls of the World takes on these challenges and is the first book to provide a comprehensive look at these birds. Concise text emphasizes field identification, with in-depth discussion of variations as well as coverage of habitat, status, and distribution. Abundant photographs highlight identification criteria and, crucially, factor in age and subspecific field separation. Informative species accounts are accompanied by detailed color range maps.

Gulls of the World is the most authoritative photographic guide to this remarkable bird family.

  • The first book to provide in-depth coverage of all the world’s gull species
  • More than 600 stunning color photographs
  • Concise text looks at variations, habitat, status, and distribution
  • Informative species accounts and color range maps

Bird Fact Friday — Pallas’s Gull

Adapted from pages 46-48 of Gulls of the World:

Pallas’s Gull is a four-year gull, but with initial rapid plumage development as in three-year gulls. The largest hooded gull by far, Pallas’s Gull is almost as large as Great Black-backed Gull, and dwarfs almost any other gull in its company. Its pear-shaped head has flat crown that peaks well behind dark eyes. These gulls have a long, heavy bill, while its head looks small relative to heavy, barrel-shaped body. In settled birds, the breast appears full, but their rear is attenuated with wings extending moderately beyond tail-tip. Loosely folded tertials create a prominent hump. Meanwhile, their legs are long and thin, with long visible tibia. 

With regards to their in flight profile, it is front-heavy with triangular head, protruding breast and slender wings, like an oversized Caspian Gull. They fly ponderously and slowly with heron-like wing-beats, gliding on angled wings with little flexing at carpal joint. The birds are known for often lowering their bill in flight. They frequently catch fish by hovering and diving. Swimming birds sit higher on water than other large gulls.

A gull.

A Pallas Gull in Uttar Pradesh, India.

These gulls are not very vocal. Calls deep and short, on breeding sites a deep há-u. Flocks utter a goose-like ga-gaga. They also make a low, slightly nasal oow, similar to the calls of the Common Raven Corvus corax. Finally, their alarm call a barking whe-ow.

These gulls breed from Central Asia W to Ukraine and the S Caspian region, along with E to W Mongolia. They nest on barren islands in saline and fresh waters, generally in warm, dry steppe areas and mountain lakes. Colonies often relocate from year to year. Main winter areas are between E Mediterranean (westwards to Sicily) and Bay of Bengal along fish-rich coasts, rivers and lakes, also fish-ponds and reservoirs. Populations from Tibet winter mainly in Bangladesh. They are scarce southwards to Lake Turkana in Kenya and eastwards to Gulf of Thailand and Hong Kong. Regular visitor to SE Europe in increasing numbers from late 1980s, with most records May–Sep; majority recorded Hungary, Romania and Poland, probably after following Dnieper River system from Ukraine. Vagrant NW Africa, Canary Islands, Madeira, most European countries northwards to Norway, Uganda, Burundi, Vietnam, E China, Taiwan, Korea and Japan.

 

Gulls of the World
By Klaus Malling Olsen

With more than 50 gull species in the world, this family of seabirds poses some of the greatest field identification challenges of any bird group: age-related plumage changes, extensive variations within species, frequent hybridization, and complex distribution. 

Gulls of the World takes on these challenges and is the first book to provide a comprehensive look at these birds. Concise text emphasizes field identification, with in-depth discussion of variations as well as coverage of habitat, status, and distribution. Abundant photographs highlight identification criteria and, crucially, factor in age and subspecific field separation. Informative species accounts are accompanied by detailed color range maps.

Gulls of the World is the most authoritative photographic guide to this remarkable bird family.

  • The first book to provide in-depth coverage of all the world’s gull species
  • More than 600 stunning color photographs
  • Concise text looks at variations, habitat, status, and distribution
  • Informative species accounts and color range maps

 

Bird Fact Friday—Giant Hummingbirds

Adapted from page 156 of Birds of Chile:

The Andean Giant Hummingbird is from the North Andes, and is fairly common in precordillera, south of Tarapacá. Their wingbeats are slow and strong, which causes undulating flight broken by glides. Their flight is often seen in jerky, hovering bursts of ‘slow-motion’ fly-catching. These birds are slightly larger and longer-billed than the Chilean Giant Hummingbird (more info on that one below) – these two birds do not have any range overlap. Adults have broader, dark tail tips, and buffer under tails than the Chilean hummingbirds. Juvenile birds have whitish feather tips on wings. Both sexes are similar. Their call are high, shrill squeaks in a short series.

An Andean Giant Hummingbird

An Andean Giant Hummingbird

A Chilean Giant Hummingbird

A Chilean Giant Hummingbird.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Meanwhile, the Chilean Giant Hummingbird is typically seen in Central Chile, where it is a fairly common breeding visitor in material, open woodland, and gardens from south Atacama to south Araucanía. Despite having no range overlap, their habits are similar to the Andean Giant Hummingbird. These birds often feed at Puya and Eycalyptus trees, and perch atop Puya trees, along with phone wires. The nests for these birds are often conspicuous. Their calls are loud, sharp seek! noises, and slightly whining tseeich chee-chee

Birds of Chile
A Photo Guide
By Steve N. G. Howell & Fabrice Schmitt

This is the first modern-style photographic field guide to the birds of Chile, an increasingly popular destination with birders and naturalists. Compact and easy to carry, pack, and use, Birds of Chileis ideal for curious naturalists and experienced birders alike, providing everything anyone needs to identify the birds they see. Clear photographs and brief, facing-page species accounts highlight what to look for and how to quickly identify species. The photos include both close-ups and birds-in-habitat images to further aid real-life identification. An introduction and maps provide an overview of Chile’s geographic regions and their distinctive birdlife. Birds of Chile is also a great resource for birding in nearby countries, especially Argentina, Bolivia, and Peru.

  • The first field-friendly photographic guide to the birds of Chile
  • More than 1,000 real-life photos and brief, facing-page text make bird identification easy
  • Overview and maps describe the distinct bird regions of Chile
  • Perfect for curious naturalists and experienced birders alike
  • Compact and easy to carry and pack
  • Also a great resource for birding in Argentina, Bolivia, and Peru

 

Bird Fact Friday – the Andean and Austral Negrito

Adapted from page 189 of Birds of Chile:

The Austral Negrito is frequently found in central or southern Chile. These birds are common summer residents from eastern Aysén, and south to Tierra del Fuego. They are fairly common from northern Chiloé to southern Atacama, mainly near the coast. Additionally, they are local in Andes. During the winter, these birds withdraw north, when they are common in Central Chile, and rare north of Arica. They prefer open areas, from sandy beaches to grassy plains, lakeshores, and riverbanks. They’re also rather quiet, with soft, high chips at times, and in display flight males give high, accelerating chips and a high slurred tssiu that carries well. Sexes are similar while immature, while the adult male is darker.

andean negrito

An adult male Andean Negrito (Lessonia oreas).

an austral negrito

An adult male Austral Negrito (Lessonia rufa).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Andean Negrito inhabits the North Andes, and is fairly common but somewhat local to Coquimbo. They frequently live in bogs, adjacent to open ground. Their calls are quiet, slightly frog like peeks. Both sexes have whitish wing patches, but female are paler. Their habits are very similar to the Austral Negrito. 

Birds of Chile
A Photo Guide
By Steve N. G. Howell & Fabrice Schmitt

This is the first modern-style photographic field guide to the birds of Chile, an increasingly popular destination with birders and naturalists. Compact and easy to carry, pack, and use, Birds of Chileis ideal for curious naturalists and experienced birders alike, providing everything anyone needs to identify the birds they see. Clear photographs and brief, facing-page species accounts highlight what to look for and how to quickly identify species. The photos include both close-ups and birds-in-habitat images to further aid real-life identification. An introduction and maps provide an overview of Chile’s geographic regions and their distinctive birdlife. Birds of Chile is also a great resource for birding in nearby countries, especially Argentina, Bolivia, and Peru.

  • The first field-friendly photographic guide to the birds of Chile
  • More than 1,000 real-life photos and brief, facing-page text make bird identification easy
  • Overview and maps describe the distinct bird regions of Chile
  • Perfect for curious naturalists and experienced birders alike
  • Compact and easy to carry and pack
  • Also a great resource for birding in Argentina, Bolivia, and Peru

Bird Fact Friday – the Tyrant Birds of Chile

Adapted from page 187 of Birds of Chile

The Patagonian Tyrant is found in central and southern Chile, and is an uncommon summer resident from Maule to the Tierra del Fuego. In the winter, they are fairly common from Biobío to Coquimbo, and become uncommon south of the Lake District. These birds breed in native forests and edge, as well as the woodland and gardens during the winter. Breeding birds go to the mid-upper levels of tall trees, at times forming small flocks in fruiting trees. Their songs are varied arrangements of high, thin, plaintive or penetrating whistles (s-weeu s-weeu w-syiu or swii-ii w-syiin). Their calls are thin, whining, drawn out whistles (pssiiiiiiiiui). These birds are understated, “soft-faced” flycatcher with a rounded head and dark cheek patch, along with rusty wingbars. There are no similar species in Chile.

A Patagonian Tyrant (Coloramphus parvirostris) perched on a tree.

A Patagonian Tyrant (Coloramphus parvirostris) perched on a tree.

Meanwhile, the Spectacled Tyrant can be found in central and southern Chile, where it is fairly common, particularly from Atacama to Chiloé, or Aysén to Magallanes, in the summer. They inhabit marshes with tall rushes, brushy fields, damp grassy plains with scattered bushes, and other locations typically near water. The males perch atop bushes and have near-vertical display flight, swooping back to perch with a flourish. Females often hide in vegetation, and are overlooked easily. In display flight, male wings make low, booming drrrrup that may suggest a bullfrog. These birds are distinctive and attractive; males have white wing flashes, while these flashes are rusty on females. Additionally, males from Aysén have bigger white wing patches. Juveniles have dark eyes, and are uniformly smaller. There are no similar species in Chile.

To catch a glimpse of the Spectacled Tyrant, along with an additional photo of the Patagonian Tyrant, head over to our Instagram

Birds of Chile
A Photo Guide
By Steve N. G. Howell & Fabrice Schmitt

This is the first modern-style photographic field guide to the birds of Chile, an increasingly popular destination with birders and naturalists. Compact and easy to carry, pack, and use, Birds of Chile is ideal for curious naturalists and experienced birders alike, providing everything anyone needs to identify the birds they see. Clear photographs and brief, facing-page species accounts highlight what to look for and how to quickly identify species. The photos include both close-ups and birds-in-habitat images to further aid real-life identification. An introduction and maps provide an overview of Chile’s geographic regions and their distinctive birdlife. Birds of Chile is also a great resource for birding in nearby countries, especially Argentina, Bolivia, and Peru.

  • The first field-friendly photographic guide to the birds of Chile
  • More than 1,000 real-life photos and brief, facing-page text make bird identification easy
  • Overview and maps describe the distinct bird regions of Chile
  • Perfect for curious naturalists and experienced birders alike
  • Compact and easy to carry and pack
  • Also a great resource for birding in Argentina, Bolivia, and Peru

Bird Fact Friday — Flamingos

Adapted from page 116 of Birds of Chile:

Flamingos are unmistakable, social wading birds. They are often associated with hot climates, but 3 species breed in the North Andes, where lakes often freeze at night. Juveniles are typically dirty whitish and brownish, with dark streaking. 1st-years are whitish overall with little pink, but attain fully pink adult plumage in 2–3 years. Within mixed-species flocks, each species tends to group together. They nest colonially in remote areas, building raised mud cup nests on ground.

An adult Chilean flamingo.

More specifically, the Chilean Flamingo is widespread throughout the country, but fairly common in the North Andes, south of Atacama. They wade in shallow, saline lakes, with non-breeders also at fresh lakes, sheltered inshore waters. Their calls suggest geese, and is made while in flight,  sounding like a honking 3-syllable ah ah-ah. The first note is quieter, last note more emphatic. Feeding birds typically give quieter bleating and honking calls. While immature Chilean flamingos soon develop pale eyes, adults are distinctive: they are pale pink with reddish-pink bustle, have red ‘knees’ on grayish legs, and pale eyes. First years are appreciably smaller than adults. 

To see what an juvenile flamingo looks like, head to our Instagram.

Birds of Chile
A Photo Guide
By Steve N. G. Howell & Fabrice Schmitt

This is the first modern-style photographic field guide to the birds of Chile, an increasingly popular destination with birders and naturalists. Compact and easy to carry, pack, and use, Birds of Chile is ideal for curious naturalists and experienced birders alike, providing everything anyone needs to identify the birds they see. Clear photographs and brief, facing-page species accounts highlight what to look for and how to quickly identify species. The photos include both close-ups and birds-in-habitat images to further aid real-life identification. An introduction and maps provide an overview of Chile’s geographic regions and their distinctive birdlife. Birds of Chile is also a great resource for birding in nearby countries, especially Argentina, Bolivia, and Peru.

  • The first field-friendly photographic guide to the birds of Chile
  • More than 1,000 real-life photos and brief, facing-page text make bird identification easy
  • Overview and maps describe the distinct bird regions of Chile
  • Perfect for curious naturalists and experienced birders alike
  • Compact and easy to carry and pack
  • Also a great resource for birding in Argentina, Bolivia, and Peru

Bird Fact Friday — The Owls of Chile

Adapted from pages 142-143 of Birds of Chile:

The Magellanic (Lesser) Horned Owl is a very large owl with barred underparts; there are no similar species to it in Chile. They are widespread and common throughout virtually all of Chile, from the Patagonian steppe to city parks. They are mainly nocturnal, but in Patagonia can be seen in daytime, as on roadside fence posts. Their songs are two deep hoots, followed by, or run into, a quavering purr (hoo-hoo’urr-rr-rr). But, at a distance, only the hoo-hoo is audible. 

Meanwhile, the Rufous-legged Owl is mainly found in central or southern Chile, typically seen in old growth forests. They hunt at clearings and edges from low to mid-level perches, making roots and calls mainly at upper-to-mid levels. Its song is a varied series of pulsating barks run into low hoots, intensifying and then fading abruptly. These calls have a slightly maniacal quality; they’re a short series of resonant hoots (wuh-wuh wuh-wuh) followed by a rasping shriek. They are distinctive due to their rounded head, dark eyes, and voice.

A perched Magellanic Horned Owl.

The Peruvian (Pacific) Pygmy-Owl is the only pygmy-owl in northern Chile. These owls live on oasis valleys and farmland, in villages, and usually with some taller trees. They hunt from perches, low to high, including roadside wires, but are often mobbed noisily by smaller birds. They fly fast and are slightly undulating. Their song is a rapid tooting noise, almost too fast to whistle, with 10 notes/1.6-2.2 seconds (huihuihui). Their call is a high, chipping twitter. Their plumage is gray to brown overall.

Finally, the Austral Pygmy-Owl is native to central and southern Chile, commonly seen in the Tierra del Fuego, but some withdraw to the north and downslope in winter. These birds live in the woodland and forest, but can be seen in town parks, farmland, and semi-open country (at least in winter). Behaviorally, they are very similar to the Peruvian Pygmy-Owl. Their songs are fairly rapid, ringing toots, easily whistled at 10 notes/2.4-2.8 seconds, often with occasional changes in pitch and tempo (whih’whih’whih…). Their calls are high, chipping twitters. Their plumage is typically brown to rusty brown. 

To see photos of all these owls, head to our Instagram.

Birds of Chile
A Photo Guide
By Steve N. G. Howell & Fabrice Schmitt

This is the first modern-style photographic field guide to the birds of Chile, an increasingly popular destination with birders and naturalists. Compact and easy to carry, pack, and use, Birds of Chile is ideal for curious naturalists and experienced birders alike, providing everything anyone needs to identify the birds they see. Clear photographs and brief, facing-page species accounts highlight what to look for and how to quickly identify species. The photos include both close-ups and birds-in-habitat images to further aid real-life identification. An introduction and maps provide an overview of Chile’s geographic regions and their distinctive birdlife. Birds of Chile is also a great resource for birding in nearby countries, especially Argentina, Bolivia, and Peru.

  • The first field-friendly photographic guide to the birds of Chile
  • More than 1,000 real-life photos and brief, facing-page text make bird identification easy
  • Overview and maps describe the distinct bird regions of Chile
  • Perfect for curious naturalists and experienced birders alike
  • Compact and easy to carry and pack
  • Also a great resource for birding in Argentina, Bolivia, and Peru

 

Bird Fact Friday — Hummingbirds

Adapted from pages 158-159 of Birds of Chile:

The Oasis Hummingbird is identifiable by its distinctive small hummer, long, slightly arched bill, and rusty rump. Males have long forked tail, and a messy gorget. These hummingbirds are found in North Chile, mainly in oasis valleys. They are also vagrant south of Santiago. While these birds can often be spotted perched on phone wires, they can also be seen in gardens, desert scrubs, and orchards. They are larger than most hummingbirds. Their call sounds like a tickling chip, that’s somewhat lower and harder than other hummingbirds. 

A male Oasis Hummingbird (Rhodopis vesper).

 

An adult Sparkling Violet-ear (Colibri coruscans).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Meanwhile, the Sparkling Violet-ear is a rather large and green hummingbird, with no similar species in Chile. Immature birds are duller with reduced violet heads, while adults can be identified by their broad, dark tail band. These birds are frequently seen North of the Andes, but are scarce in Arica. They are typically seen near agricultural areas with flowering Eucalyptus and gardens. Their songs, which they sing from mid-upper level perches, are metallic, rhythmic chirping (tchi-chin tchi-chin) which is repeated tirelessly. Their sexes are indistinguishable. 

Birds of Chile
A Photo Guide
By Steve N. G. Howell & Fabrice Schmitt

This is the first modern-style photographic field guide to the birds of Chile, an increasingly popular destination with birders and naturalists. Compact and easy to carry, pack, and use, Birds of Chile is ideal for curious naturalists and experienced birders alike, providing everything anyone needs to identify the birds they see. Clear photographs and brief, facing-page species accounts highlight what to look for and how to quickly identify species. The photos include both close-ups and birds-in-habitat images to further aid real-life identification. An introduction and maps provide an overview of Chile’s geographic regions and their distinctive birdlife. Birds of Chile is also a great resource for birding in nearby countries, especially Argentina, Bolivia, and Peru.

  • The first field-friendly photographic guide to the birds of Chile
  • More than 1,000 real-life photos and brief, facing-page text make bird identification easy
  • Overview and maps describe the distinct bird regions of Chile
  • Perfect for curious naturalists and experienced birders alike
  • Compact and easy to carry and pack
  • Also a great resource for birding in Argentina, Bolivia, and Peru

 

Bird Fact Friday – the Parakeets of Chile

Adapted from pages 152-153 of Birds of Chile:

The Slender-billed Parakeet is endemic to the Lake District, from Araucanía to Chiloé. It is fairly common in farmland, other semi-open areas with forest patches and scattered tall trees. They frequently travel in scattered pairs or flocks, often numbering in the 100s, even 1000s. The feed in trees and on the ground, digging with its bills for seeds. They typically fly at a treetop level, but are also known for going high overhead, especially when in large flocks. Varied raucous and shrieky calls at times suggest lapwings. They are identifiable by their long, slender bill hook, and bright red face patch.

The Austral Parakeet resembles the Slender-billed Parakeet, though the latter has brighter blue wings. These birds are typically found in South or Central Chile, and are fairly common north of Maule. They are native to forests and woodland, and live adjacently to farmland with forest patches. They typically live in pairs or small flocks, rarely exceeding 100 birds. They do not mix with the Slender-billed Parakeet. These parakeets typically feed in trees or on the ground, and fly mostly near treetop height. Their calls are varied, raucous screeches. 

Monk Parakeets are found in central Chile, where they are local but increasingly escaped cage birds, mainly in Santiago and Valparaíso. They are found in parks, urban and rural areas with taller trees, and they frequently feed in trees and on the ground. They nest colonially in bulky stick nests at mid-upper levels in trees. They can be identified by their are rasping shrieks, or lower, more gravelly calls. These birds have a distinct look due to their ashy-gray faces and chests; no other species in Chile look like this.

Finally, the Burrowing Parakeet is native to Central Chile, often found in the Andean foothills from south Atacama to Male. These birds are typically seen in open woodland and farmland with nearby bluffs or cliffs, where they nest colonially in burrows. They typically roam in pairs or small flocks, on the ground or in trees. They are known for their laughing calls, singly or in a series. These parakeets also have a distinct, unmistakable look, with a dark green face, white chest, yellow-red underparts, and dark wings.

Fly over to our Instagram to see photos of these four birds.

 

 

Birds of Chile
A Photo Guide
By Steve N. G. Howell & Fabrice Schmitt

This is the first modern-style photographic field guide to the birds of Chile, an increasingly popular destination with birders and naturalists. Compact and easy to carry, pack, and use, Birds of Chile is ideal for curious naturalists and experienced birders alike, providing everything anyone needs to identify the birds they see. Clear photographs and brief, facing-page species accounts highlight what to look for and how to quickly identify species. The photos include both close-ups and birds-in-habitat images to further aid real-life identification. An introduction and maps provide an overview of Chile’s geographic regions and their distinctive birdlife. Birds of Chile is also a great resource for birding in nearby countries, especially Argentina, Bolivia, and Peru.

  • The first field-friendly photographic guide to the birds of Chile
  • More than 1,000 real-life photos and brief, facing-page text make bird identification easy
  • Overview and maps describe the distinct bird regions of Chile
  • Perfect for curious naturalists and experienced birders alike
  • Compact and easy to carry and pack
  • Also a great resource for birding in Argentina, Bolivia, and Peru

Bird Fact Friday: Seedeaters

Adapted from pages 220-221 of Birds of Chile:

The Chestnut-throated Seedeater is fairly common in the oasis valleys of Arica, as well as Northern lowlands. These birds – which are typically 10.5-11cm in length – flock in agricultural areas with brushy hedgerows and weedy fields. They can often be found singing on phone wires, with a song that is squeaky and slightly tinny. This song’s tempo varies from leisurely to rapid and bubbly; at times it’s prolonged. Their call is either a nasal cheh or a slightly smacking tchip. Males can be identified with their gray head and back in breeding plumage; females have faint streaking on their breast and a big, pinkish bill. Male juveniles resemble females, but are buffer.

A female Chestnut-throated Seedeater (Sporophila telasco).

A male Band-tailed Seedeater (Catamenia analis).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Band-tailed Seedeater is found in the North Andes, and is fairly common in the precordillera of Arica. They can be seen in shrubby slopes and agricultural areas or villages, while they frequently feed in bushes and on the ground, often with other seed-eating birds in recently cut alfalfa fields. Their song is varied short buzzes and buzzy, ringing trills; at times it becomes a high, chipping twitter. Their call is a high, slightly buzzy tzzip or tzzip-zzip. Both sexes have stubby, yellowish bills, a rusty vent, and a white band at the base of their tail best seen in flight.

Birds of Chile
A Photo Guide
By Steve N. G. Howell & Fabrice Schmitt

This is the first modern-style photographic field guide to the birds of Chile, an increasingly popular destination with birders and naturalists. Compact and easy to carry, pack, and use, Birds of Chile is ideal for curious naturalists and experienced birders alike, providing everything anyone needs to identify the birds they see. Clear photographs and brief, facing-page species accounts highlight what to look for and how to quickly identify species. The photos include both close-ups and birds-in-habitat images to further aid real-life identification. An introduction and maps provide an overview of Chile’s geographic regions and their distinctive birdlife. Birds of Chile is also a great resource for birding in nearby countries, especially Argentina, Bolivia, and Peru.

  • The first field-friendly photographic guide to the birds of Chile
  • More than 1,000 real-life photos and brief, facing-page text make bird identification easy
  • Overview and maps describe the distinct bird regions of Chile
  • Perfect for curious naturalists and experienced birders alike
  • Compact and easy to carry and pack
  • Also a great resource for birding in Argentina, Bolivia, and Peru