Steven S. Gubser & Frans Pretorius: The Little Book of Black Holes

Black holes, predicted by Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity more than a century ago, have long intrigued scientists and the public with their bizarre and fantastical properties. Although Einstein understood that black holes were mathematical solutions to his equations, he never accepted their physical reality—a viewpoint many shared. This all changed in the 1960s and 1970s, when a deeper conceptual understanding of black holes developed just as new observations revealed the existence of quasars and X-ray binary star systems, whose mysterious properties could be explained by the presence of black holes. Black holes have since been the subject of intense research—and the physics governing how they behave and affect their surroundings is stranger and more mind-bending than any fiction. The Little Book of Black Holes by Steven S. Gubser and Frans Pretorius takes readers deep into the mysterious heart of the subject, offering rare clarity of insight into the physics that makes black holes simple yet destructive manifestations of geometric destiny. Read on to learn a bit more about black holes and what inspired the authors to write this book.

Your book tells the story of black holes from a physics perspective. What are black holes, really? What’s inside?

Black holes are regions of spacetime from which nothing can escape, not even light. In our book, we try to live up to our title by getting quickly to the heart of the subject, explaining in non-technical terms what black holes are and how we use Einstein’s theory of relativity to understand them. What’s inside black holes is a great mystery. Taken at face value, general relativity says spacetime inside a black hole collapses in on itself, so violently that singularities form. We need something more than Einstein’s theory of relativity to understand what these singularities mean. Hawking showed that quantum effects cause black holes to radiate very faintly. That radiation is linked with quantum fluctuations inside the black hole. But it’s a matter of ongoing debate whether these fluctuations are a key to resolving the puzzle of the singularity, or whether some more drastic theory is needed.

How sure are we that black holes exist?

A lot more certain than we were a few years ago. In September 2015, the LIGO experiment detected gravitational waves from the collision of two black holes, each one about thirty times the mass of the sun. Everything about that detection fit our expectations based on Einstein’s theories, so it’s hard to escape the conclusion that there really are black holes out there. In fact, before the LIGO detection we were already pretty sure that black holes exist. Matter swirling around gigantic black holes at the core of distant galaxies form the brightest objects in the Universe. They’re called quasars, and the only reason they’re dim in our sight is that they’re so far away, literally across the Universe. Similar effects around smaller black holes generate X-rays that we can detect relatively nearby, mere thousands of light years away from us. And we have good evidence that there is a large black hole at the center of the Milky Way.

Can you talk a bit about the formation of black holes?

Black holes with mass comparable to the sun can form when big stars run out of fuel and collapse in on themselves. Ordinarily, gravity is the weakest force, but when too much matter comes together, no force conceivable can hold it up against the pull of gravity. In a sense, even spacetime collapses when a black hole forms, and the result is a black hole geometry: an endless inward cascade of nothing into nothing. All the pyrotechnics that we see in distant quasars and some nearby X-ray sources comes from matter rubbing against itself as it follows this inward cascade.

How have black holes become so interesting to non-specialists? How have they been glorified in popular culture?

There’s so much poetry in black hole physics. Black hole horizons are where time stands still—literally! Black holes are the darkest things that exist in Nature, formed from the ultimate ashes of used-up stars. But they create brilliant light in the process of devouring yet more matter. The LIGO detection was based on a black hole collision that shook the Universe, with a peak power greater than all stars combined; yet we wouldn’t even have noticed it here on earth without the most exquisitely sensitive detector of spacetime distortions ever built. Strangest of all, when stripped of surrounding matter, black holes are nothing but empty space. Their emptiness is actually what makes them easy to understand mathematically. Only deep inside the horizon does the emptiness end in a terrible, singular core (we think). Horrendous as this sounds, black holes could also be doorways into wormholes connecting distant parts of the Universe. But before packing our bags for a trip from Deep Space Nine to the Gamma Quadrant, we’ve got to read the fine print: as far as we know, it’s impossible to make a traversable wormhole.

What inspired you to write this book? Was there a point in life where your interest in this topic was piqued?

We both feel extremely fortunate to have had great mentors, including Igor Klebanov, Curt Callan, Werner Israel, Matthew Choptuik, and Kip Thorne who gave us a lot of insight into black holes and general relativity. And we owe a big shout-out to our editor, Ingrid Gnerlich, who suggested that we write this book.

GubserSteven S. Gubser is professor of physics at Princeton University and the author of The Little Book of String Theory. Frans Pretorius is professor of physics at Princeton.

Read like a Nobel Prize-winning physicist

This morning Princeton University Press was thrilled to congratulate PUP author and celebrated physicist Kip Thorne on being a co-winner of the Nobel Prize in Physics for 2017. Dr. Thorne’s research has focused on Einstein’s general theory of relativity and astrophysics, with emphasis on relativistic stars, black holes, and especially gravitational waves. The latter observation, made in September 2015, validated a key prediction of Einstein’s general theory of relativity. Princeton University Press is honored to be the publisher of Dr. Thorne’s Modern Classical Physics, co-authored with Roger Blandford, and the new hardback edition of the renowned classic, Gravitation, co-authored with Charles Misner and the late John Wheeler, forthcoming this fall.

Over the years, we’ve published several Nobel winners, including:

  • Einstein
  • Richard Feynman (QED)
  • P.W. Anderson (the classic and controversial Theory of Superconductivity in the High-Tc Cuprates)
  • Paul Dirac (General Theory of Relativity)
  • Werner Heisenberg (Encounters with Einstein)

Interested in learning more about physics yourself? We put together the ultimate Nobel reading list. Click the graphic for links to each book.

PUP congratulates Kip S. Thorne, joint winner of the Nobel Prize in Physics

New Books Gravitation and Modern Classical Physics Publishing in October 2017

Princeton, NJ, October 3, 2017—Upon today’s announcement that Dr. Kip S. Thorne is the joint winner of the Nobel Prize in Physics for 2017, Princeton University Press would like to extend hearty congratulations to the celebrated physicist.

The Royal Swedish Academy recognizes Dr. Thorne, along with Rainer Weiss and Barry C. Barish, for decisive contributions to the LIGO detector and the observation of gravitational waves”.

Feynman Professor of Theoretical Physics, Emeritus at the California Institute of Technology, Dr. Thorne has focused his research on Einstein’s general theory of relativity and on astrophysics, with emphasis on relativistic stars, black holes, and especially gravitational waves. The latter observation, made in September 2015, validated a key prediction of Einstein’s general theory of relativity.

Princeton University Press is honored to be the publisher of Dr. Thorne’s Modern Classical Physics, co-authored with Roger Blandford, and the new hardback edition of the renowned classic, Gravitation, co-authored with Charles Misner and the late John Wheeler, publishing in October 2017.

According to Christie Henry, director of Princeton University Press, “Dr. Thorne’s creativity and brilliance have been as grounding to Princeton University Press’s publishing program in the physical sciences as gravitation is to the human experience.  His recently released Princeton University Press contributions, Gravitation and Modern Classical Physics, are vital to our mission of illuminating spheres of knowledge to advance and enrich the human conversation, and today we celebrate his commitment to science with the Nobel committee and readers across the universe.”

Since the publication of Albert Einstein’s The Meaning of Relativity in 1922, Princeton University Press has remained committed to publishing global thought leaders in the sciences and beyond. We are honored to count Dr. Thorne’s work as part of this legacy.

Thorne

For more information, please contact:

Julia Haav, Assistant Publicity Director

Julia_Haav@press.princeton.edu, 609.258.2831

 

Michael Strauss: America’s Eclipse

Welcome to the UniverseOn Monday, August 21, people all across the United States will witness one of the rarest and most spectacular of all astronomical phenomena: a total solar eclipse. This occurs when the position of the Moon and the Sun in the sky align perfectly, such that the Moon’s shadow falls onto a specific point on the Earth’s surface. If you are lucky enough to be standing in the shadow, you will see the Sun’s light completely blocked by the Moon: the sky will become dark, and the stars and planets will become visible. But because the apparent sizes of the Moon and the Sun are almost the same, and because everything is in motion—the Moon orbits Earth, and Earth rotates around its axis and orbits the Sun—the Moon’s shadow moves quickly.  During the eclipse, the Moon’s shadow will cross the United States at a speed of 1800 miles per hour, taking about 90 minutes to travel from the Pacific Coast in Oregon to touch the Atlantic in South Carolina.  This means that totality, the time when the Sun’s disk is completely covered as seen from any given spot along the eclipse path, is very brief: 2 minutes and 40 seconds at best.

If you are standing along the eclipse path, it takes about 2.5 hours for the Moon to pass across the Sun.  That is, you will see the disk of the Sun eaten away, becoming an ever-narrowing crescent. During this time, you can only look at the Sun with eclipse glasses (make sure they are from a reputable company!), which block the vast majority of the light from the Sun.  It is also fun to look at the dappled shadows underneath a leafy tree; if you look closely, you’ll see that the individual spots of light are all crescent-shaped. A bit more than an hour after the Moon begins to cover the Sun, you reach the point of totality, and the sky becomes dark. It is now safe to remove your eclipse glasses.

Experiencing a few minutes of darkness in the middle of the day is pretty cool. But what makes the eclipse really special is that with the light of the Sun’s disk blocked out, the faint outer atmosphere of the Sun, its corona, becomes visible to the naked eye. The corona consists of tenuous gas extending over millions of miles, with a temperature of a few million degrees. It is shaped by the complex magnetic field of the Sun, and may exhibit a complex arrangement of loops and filaments: indeed, observations of the solar corona during eclipses have been one of the principal ways in which astronomers have learned about its magnetic field. The sight is awe-inspiring; those who have experienced it say that it is as a life-changing experience.

As the Moon starts to move off the disk, the full brightness of the Sun becomes visible again, and you must put your eclipse glasses back on to protect your eyes. The Sun now appears as a narrow and ever-widening crescent. A bit more than an hour later, the Sun’s disk is completely uncovered.

The shadow of the Moon will be about 70 miles in diameter at any given time. That means that if you are not standing in that 70-mile-wide path as the shadow crosses the country, you will only see a partial solar eclipse, in which you will see the Sun appearing as a crescent.  Again, be sure to wear eclipse glasses to look at the Sun!

Solar eclipses happen roughly once or twice a year somewhere on Earth’s surface, but because  of the narrowness of the eclipse path, the number of people standing in the path is usually relatively small. This one, crossing the entire continental US, is special in this regard: tens of millions of people live within a few hours of the eclipse path. This promises to be the most widely seen and recorded eclipse in history! I have never seen a total eclipse of the Sun before, and am very excited to be traveling with my family to Oregon, where we have our fingers crossed for good weather. So, to all those who have the opportunity to stand in the Moon’s shadow, get yourself a pair of eclipse glasses, and prepare yourself to be awed.

Michael A. Strauss is professor of astrophysics at Princeton University. He is the coauthor (with Neil deGrasse Tyson and J. Richard Gott) of Welcome to the Universe: An Astrophysical Tour.

Anna Frebel: Solar Eclipse 2017

Next Monday, the U.S. will witness an absolutely breathtaking natural spectacle. One worthy of many tweets as it is of the astronomical kind—quite literally. I’m talking about the upcoming total solar eclipse where, for a short couple of minutes, the Moon will move directly into our line of sight to perfectly eclipse the Sun.

During the so-called “totality,” when the Sun is fully covered, everything around you will take on twilight colors. It will get cooler, the birds will become quieter, and you’ll get this eerie feeling that something is funny is going on. No wonder that in ancient times, people thought the world would end during such an event.

I have witnessed this twice before. 1999 in Munich, Germany, and 2002 in Ceduna, Australia. Like so many others, I traveled there with great anticipation to see the Sun disappear on us. In both cases, however, it was cloudy for hours before totality which caused frustration and even anxiety in the crowd. But nature happened to be kind. A few minutes before totality, the clouds parted to let us catch a glimpse. We experienced how the disk of the Sun finally fully vanished just after seeing the last little rays of light peeking through that produced a famous “diamond ring” image. We could also see the glowing corona surrounding the black Sun. All the while, nature around us transformed into what felt like a cool and breezy late summer evening. A few minutes later, everything was back to normal and the clouds covered it all once again like nothing had ever happened. The exact same cloud scenario happened both times—how lucky was that?

As for next Monday, I sincerely hope the clouds will stay home. I know so many folks who will travel from far and wide into the totality zone to experience this “Great American Eclipse.” It is actually fairly narrow, only about 100 miles wide, but stretches diagonally across the entire U.S.. For many, this will be a once in a lifetime opportunity to see such a rare event and I’m sure this experience will stay with them for years to come. It sure did for me.

I will actually not travel into the totality zone. Instead, I’ll be watching and talking about the partial eclipse that we can see up here in Massachusetts with my three year old son and his preschool class. A partial eclipse lasts for a couple of hours and occurs when the alignment between Earth, Moon, and Sun is just a bit “off.” Generally, this can happen when these three bodies are indeed not going to perfectly align. Or, when a person on Earth is close but not right in the totality zone, it causes a misalignment between the observer, the Moon, and the Sun. In both cases, the Sun is not going to get fully covered. Nevertheless, it is still a marvelous event and great for children and anyone interested to learn about solar eclipses and astronomy. And luckily enough, everyone in the U.S., Canada, and Mexico can watch a partial eclipse, no matter where you are located.

Solar eclipses don’t happen randomly. There are part of long lasting cycles that stem from the motion of the Moon around the Earth and the alignment of its orbit with respect to the Sun. This eclipse is part of the famous Saros cycle 145, and so was the 1999 eclipse I saw in Munich. It produces eclipses every 18 years, 11 days and 8h. Subsequent Saros eclipses are visible from different parts of the globe.The extra 8 hours in the cycle mean that from one eclipse to the next, the Earth must rotate an additional ~8 hours or ~120º. Hence, this eclipse is ~120º westward from continental Europe which is the continental U.S.. The next one will be visible from China in 2035. Each of the many Saros series typically lasts 12 to 13 centuries. Series 145 began in 1639 and will end in 3009 after 77 eclipses.

There are 4 to 6 total eclipses every year but not all are visible on land. Actually, from about any given point on Earth, once every 150 years an eclipse is visible. Now, it’s our turn. So if you’re not already traveling into the totality zone, make sure you still watch the partial eclipse—never without eclipse glasses, though, partial or total eclipse alike! Looking into the Sun causes serious longterm damage to your eyes but also your camera. So equip your camera with glasses, too! Alternatively, you can just watch the Sun’s shadow on a wall to observe how the Sun gets eaten away piece by piece by the incoming Moon. Ask your work if you can take a few minutes off. It’s a worthy cause. Actually, a well-timed bathroom break is almost long enough to catch totality or a glimpse of partial coverage. Eclipses are simply too rare and too beautiful to miss!

Get your eclipse glasses, rearrange your schedule (just a little bit), and make sure your kids or grandkids, friends and neighbors are seeing it too. Because, actually, the tides of the oceans on Earth are slowing down Earth’s rotation which make the Moon spiral outward and away from us by 1 inch per year. This means that the Moon will appear smaller and smaller with time, and in the far future, there won’t be any total eclipses possible anymore.

FrebelAnna Frebel is the Silverman (1968) Family Career Development Assistant Professor in the Department of Physics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She has received numerous international honors and awards for her discoveries and analyses of the oldest stars. She is the author of Searching for the Oldest Stars: Ancient Relics from the Early Universe.

PUP Celebrates The Total Eclipse with Three Giveaways

In celebration of the solar eclipse on August 21, Princeton University Press will be hosting three giveaways. If you’d like the chance to learn more about astronomy after next week’s solar event, you’re in luck. We’ll be giving away three of our favorite books via Goodreads:

These giveaways will run through Tuesday, August 22.

Welcome to the Universe Searching for the Oldest Stars The Cosmic Cocktail

Welcome to the Universe microsite receives a Webby

We’re pleased to announce that the accompanying microsite to Welcome to the Universe by Neil DeGrasse Tyson, Michael A. Strauss, and J. Richard Gott has won a People’s Choice Webby in the Best Use of Animation or Motion Graphics category. Congratulations to Eastern Standard, the web designer, on a beautifully designed site.

Winning a Webby is especially gratifying because it honors how much fun we had making the site. We knew we wanted an unconventional approach that would mirror both the complexity and accessibility of the book it was meant to promote. Our wonderful in-house team and creative partners, Eastern Standard took on this challenge, and we are so happy with the results.
—Maria Lindenfeldar, Creative Director, Princeton University Press 

Creating this microsite was a wonderful experiment for us at Princeton University Press.  We wanted to explore how we, as a publisher, could present one of our major books to the public in a compelling way in the digital environment.  Ideally, we had a vision of creating a simple site with intuitive navigation that would give readers an inviting mini-tour through the topics of the book, Welcome to the Universe, by Neil deGrasse Tyson, Michael Strauss, and Richard Gott.  The animation was meant to be subtle, but meaningful, and to gently encourage user interaction, so that the focus would always remain immersing the reader in the content of the book – what we feel is the most interesting part!  We were very happy with how it turned out and now all the more thrilled and honored that the site was chosen for a Webby!
—Ingrid Gnerlich, Science Publisher, Princeton University Press

Welcome to the Universe microsite nominated for a Webby

We’re thrilled to announce that the microsite for Welcome to the Universe by Neil DeGrasse Tyson, Michael A. Strauss, and J. Richard Gott, designed by Eastern Standard, has been nominated for a Webby in the Best Use of Animation or Motion Graphics category. Be sure to check it out and vote for the best of the internet!

webby

 

Browse Our Physics & Astrophysics 2017 Catalog

We invite you to explore our Physics & Astrophysics 2017 Catalog:

PUP will be at the 229th Meeting of the American Astronomical Society in Grapevine, Texas from January 3 to January 7. Come and visit us at booth #200! Also, follow #AAS229 and @PrincetonUnivPress on Twitter for updates and information on our new and forthcoming titles throughout the meeting.

Welcome to the Universe is a personal guided tour of the cosmos by three of today’s leading astrophysicists: Neil deGrasse Tyson, Michael A. Strauss, and J. Richard Gott. Breathtaking in scope and stunningly illustrated throughout, this book is for those who hunger for insights into our evolving universe that only world-class astrophysicists can provide.

Tyson et al Welcome to the Universe

In Fashion, Faith, and Fantasy in the New Physics of the Universe, acclaimed physicist and bestselling author Roger Penrose argues that fashion, faith, and fantasy, while sometimes productive and even essential in physics, may be leading today’s researchers astray in three of the field’s most important areas—string theory, quantum mechanics, and cosmology.

Penrose Fashion

An accessible blend of narrative history and science, Strange Glow describes mankind’s extraordinary, thorny relationship with radiation, including the hard-won lessons of how radiation helps and harms our health. Timothy Jorgensen explores how our knowledge of and experiences with radiation in the last century can lead us to smarter personal decisions about radiation exposures today.

Jorgensen Strange Glow

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Exclusive interview with Neil deGrasse Tyson, Michael A. Strauss, and J. Richard Gott on their NYT bestseller, Welcome to the Universe

UniverseWe’re thrilled to announce that Welcome to the Universe, a guided tour of the cosmos by three of today’s leading astrophysicists, recently made the New York Times extended bestseller list in science. Inspired by the enormously popular introductory astronomy course that Neil deGrasse Tyson, Michael A. Strauss, and J. Richard Gott taught together at Princeton, this book covers it all—from planets, stars, and galaxies to black holes, wormholes, and time travel. The authors introduce some of the hot topics in astrophysics in today’s Q&A:


What is the Cosmic Perspective?

NDT: A view bigger than your own that offers a humbling, yet enlightening, and occasionally empowering outlook on our place as humans in time, space, on Earth and in the Universe. We devote many pages of Welcome to the Universe to establishing our place in the cosmos – not only declarations of that place, but also the reasons and the foundations for how we have come to learn how we fit in that place. When armed with a cosmic perspective, many earthly problems seem small, yet you cultivate a new sense of belonging to the universe. You are, in fact, a participant in the great unfolding of cosmic events.

What are some of the takeaways from the book?

NDT: If you read the entire book, and if we have succeeded as authors, then you should walk away with a deep sense of the operations of nature, and an appreciation for the size and scale of the universe; how and why planets form; how and why we search for planets orbiting around other stars, and alien life that may thrive upon them; how and why stars are born, live out their lives and die; what galaxies are and why they are the largest organizations of stars in the universe; the large scale structure of galaxies and space-time; the origins and future of the universe, Einstein’s relativity, black holes, and gravitational waves; and time travel. If that’s not enough, you will also learn about some of the continued unsolved mysteries in our field, such as dark matter, dark energy, and multiverses.

This book has more equations than do most popular books about astrophysics.  Was that a deliberate decision?

MAS: Yes.  The book’s subtitle is “An Astrophysical Tour,” and one of our goals in writing it was to show how observations, the laws of physics, and some high school mathematics can combine to yield the amazing discoveries of modern astrophysics: A Big Bang that happened 13.8 billion years ago (we show you how that number is determined), the dominant role dark matter has in the properties of galaxies (we tell you how we came to that conclusion), even the fact that some planets orbiting other stars have conditions conducive for liquid water to exist on their surface, thought to be a necessary prerequisite for life. Our goal is not just to present the wonders of the universe to the reader, but to have the reader understand how we have determined what we know, and where the remaining uncertainties (and there are plenty of them!) lie.

So your emphasis is on astrophysics as a quantitative science, a branch of physics?

MAS:  Yes.  We introduce the necessary physics concepts as we go: we do not expect the reader to know this physics before they read the book.  But astrophysicists are famous (perhaps notorious!) for rough calculations, “to astrophysical accuracy.”  We also lead the reader through some examples of such rough calculations, where we aim to get an answer to “an order of magnitude.”  That is, we’re delighted if we get an estimate that’s correct to within a factor of 2, or so.  Such calculations are useful in everyday life, helping us discriminate the nonsensical from the factual in the numerical world in which we live.

Can you give an example?

MAS: Most people in everyday discourse don’t think much about the distinction between “million,” “billion,” “trillion,” and so on, hearing them all as “a really big number,” with not much difference between them.  It is actually a real problem, and the difference between Federal budget items causing millions vs. billions of dollars is of course huge.  Our politicians and the media are confusing these all the time.  We hope that the readers of this book will come away with a renewed sense of how to think about numbers, big and small, and see whether the numbers they read about in the media make sense.

Is time travel possible?

JRG: In 1905 Einstein proved that time travel to the future is possible. Get on a rocket and travel out to the star Betelgeuse 500 light-years away and return at a speed of 99.995 % the speed of light and you will age only 10 years, but when you get back it will be the year 3016 on Earth. Even though we have not gone that fast or far, we still have time travelers among us today. Our greatest time traveler to date is the Russian cosmonaut Gennady Padalka, who by virtue of traveling at high speed in low Earth orbit for 879 days aged 1/44 of a second less than if he had stayed home. Thus, when he returned, he found Earth to be 1/44 of a second to the future of where he expected it to be. He has time traveled 1/44 of a second to the future. An astronaut traveling to the planet Mercury, living there for 30 years, and returning to Earth, would time travel into the future by 22 seconds. Einstein’s equations of general relativity, his theory of curved spacetime to explain gravity, have solutions that are sufficiently twisted to allow time travel to the past. Wormholes and moving cosmic strings are two examples. The time traveler can loop back to visit an event in his own past. Such a time machine cannot be used to journey back in time before it was created. Thus, if some supercivilization were to create one by twisting spacetime in the year 3000, they might use it to go from 3002 back to 3001, but they couldn’t use it go back to 2016, because that is before the time loop was created. To understand whether such time machines can be realized, we may need to understand how gravity works on microscopic scales, which will require us to develop a theory of quantum gravity. Places to look for naturally occurring time machines would be in the interiors of rotating black holes and at the very beginning of the universe, where spacetime is strongly curved.

Do we live in a multiverse?

JRG: A multiverse seems to be a natural consequence of the theory of inflation. Inflation explains beautifully the pattern of slightly hotter and colder spots we see in the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation. It explains why the universe is so large and why it is as smooth as it is and still has enough variations in density to allow gravity to grow these into galaxies and clusters of galaxies by the present epoch. It also explains why the geometry of the universe at the present epoch is approximately Euclidean. Inflation is a period of hyperactive accelerated expansion occurring at the beginning of our universe. It is powered by a large vacuum energy density and negative pressure permeating empty space that is gravitationally repulsive. The universe doubles in size about every 3 10-38 seconds. With this rate of doubling, it very quickly grows to enormous size: 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 64, 128, 256, 512, 1024… That explains why the universe is so large. When the high density vacuum state decays, it doesn’t do so all at once. Like water boiling in a pot, it does not turn into steam all at once, but should form bubbles. Each expanding bubble makes a universe. The inflationary sea should expand forever, creating an infinite number of bubble universes, ours being one of them. Other distant bubble universes are so far away, and the space between us and them is expanding so fast, that light from them may never reach us. Nevertheless, multiple universes seem a nearly inevitable consequence of inflation.

What discovery about the universe surprises or inspires you the most?

JRG: Perhaps the most amazing thing about the universe is that it is comprehensible to intelligent, carbon-based life forms like ourselves. We have been able to discover how old the universe is (13.8 billion years) and figure out many of the laws by which it operates. The object of this book is to make the universe comprehensible to our readers.

Don’t miss this C-Span video on the book, in which the authors answer questions about the universe, including how it began and the likelihood of intelligent life elsewhere.

Neil deGrasse Tyson is director of the Hayden Planetarium at the American Museum of Natural History. He is the author of many books, including Space Chronicles: Facing the Ultimate Frontier, and the host of the Emmy Award–winning documentary Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey. Michael A. Strauss is professor of astrophysics at Princeton University. J. Richard Gott is professor of astrophysics at Princeton University. His books include The Cosmic Web: Mysterious Architecture of the Universe (Princeton).

Neil DeGrasse Tyson & Stephen Colbert: Make America Smart Again

On November 9, Neil DeGrasse Tyson joined Stephen Colbert on The Late Show to talk about Welcome to the Universe and to blow his own mind. Watch the clip here:

 

The companion website to Welcome to the Universe launches today

Welcome to the UniverseWe’re thrilled to launch this beautiful companion website to the highly anticipated new book, Welcome to the Universe by Neil DeGrasse Tyson, Michael Strauss, and Richard Gott.

If you’ve ever wondered about the universe and our place in it, then this elegant mini-tour of the cosmos is for you. Divided into three parts called ‘Stars, Planets and Life,’ ‘Galaxies,’ and ‘Einstein and the Universe,’ the site is designed to take you on a journey through the major ideas in Welcome to the Universe. We hope you learn something new and exciting about outer space. If you find something interesting and would like to share, please do! The site is set up to make sharing interesting tidbits on social media easy. Want to learn more? The site also includes information on where to learn more about each topic. Keep an eye out for the book in October 2016.

 

Welcome to the Universe: An Astrophysical Tour by Neil deGrasse Tyson, Michael A. Strauss & J. Richard Gott from Princeton University Press on Vimeo.