Don’t forget to enter The Warbler Guide sweepstakes!

[Update -- all winners have been notified as of January 15, 2015. Thank you for entering our giveaway!]

Don’t let post-Holiday doldrums, back-to-work blahs, and wintery weather get you down. Look forward to spring, warblers, and birdwatching by entering The Warbler Guide Sweepstakes.

Our prize package includes a download of The Warbler Guide App, a copy of The Warbler Guide, a pair of Zeiss TERRA ED binoculars, and the audio companion for The Warbler Guide. The total value of this prize is $400.00.

How to win? There are numerous ways to win, including visiting The Warbler Guide’s Facebook page, emailing us at blog@press.princeton.edu, following @PrincetonNature. or @TheWarblerGuide on Twitter. Just follow the steps in the Rafflecopter box below. The winner will be selected on January 9, 2015.

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New Year, New Books

Books released during the week of January 5, 2015
American Insecurity: Why Our Economic Fears Lead to Political Inaction<br>Adam Seth Levine American Insecurity:
Why Our Economic Fears Lead to Political Inaction
Adam Seth Levine
“The worst economic crisis since the Great Depression, growing financial threats to the middle class, and the biggest political movement is the antigovernment Tea Party. What gives? The answer is that Americans buffeted by economic risks don’t give. They don’t give money or time to political organizations seeking to improve economic security. When you try to rally people to the cause, you inadvertently but powerfully deter their political participation. Levine has provided a compelling new account of a profound, and profoundly important, paradox.”–Jacob S. Hacker, author of The Great Risk Shift

Hardcover | 2015 | $29.95 / £19.95
eBook available

Government Paternalism: Nanny State or Helpful Friend?<br>Julian Le Grand & Bill New Government Paternalism:
Nanny State or Helpful Friend?
Julian Le Grand & Bill New
“This well-structured, clearly presented, and well-written book steers a sophisticated course between the extremes of antipaternalism and paternalism by identifying the boundaries between legitimate and illegitimate paternalism. The current debate on the policies that nudge individuals to make better decisions makes this discussion timely. There is no book available that treats the same subject with as much range.”–Alan Hamlin, University of Manchester

Hardcover | 2015 | $29.95 / £19.95
eBook available

Higher Education in the Digital Age<br>Updated edition<br>William G. Bowen <br>With a new foreword by Kevin M. Guthrie and a new appendix by the author Higher Education in the Digital Age
Updated edition
William G. Bowen
With a new foreword by Kevin M. Guthrie and a new appendix by the author
“A slim and highly readable volumne. . . . The collection of voices provides a thoughtful and provocative discussion of the emergence of online education.”–Richard D. Kahlenberg, The Century Foundation

Paperback | 2015 | $16.95 / £11.95
eBook available

Irrational Exuberance<br>Revised and Expanded Third edition<br>Robert J. Shiller Irrational Exuberance
Revised and Expanded Third edition
Robert J. Shiller
Praise for the previous edition: From review of Princeton’s previous edition: “Robert J. Shiller . . . has done more than any other economist of his generation to document the less rational aspects of financial markets.”–Paul Krugman, New York Times

Hardcover | 2015 | $29.95 / £19.95
eBook available

Locus of Authority: The Evolution of Faculty Roles in the Governance of Higher Education<br>William G. Bowen & Eugene M. Tobin Locus of Authority:
The Evolution of Faculty Roles in the Governance of Higher Education
William G. Bowen & Eugene M. Tobin
“Withering critiques of the academy appear daily, predicting the end of higher education as we know it. Bowen and Tobin step into this fray with insight, deep knowledge of the field, data, and a good eye for history. Their eminently sensible book convincingly argues that higher education institutions have evolved over time in response to pressures and challenges, and that they are capable of continuing this evolution.”–Lawrence S. Bacow, president emeritus, Tufts University

Hardcover | 2015 | $29.95 / £19.95
eBook available

The Papers of Thomas Jefferson: Retirement Series: Volume 11: 19 January to 31 August 1817<br>Thomas Jefferson<br>Edited by J. Jefferson Looney The Papers of Thomas Jefferson:
Retirement Series:
Volume 11: 19 January to 31 August 1817
Thomas Jefferson
Edited by J. Jefferson Looney
The 584 documents in this volume cover the period from 19 January to 31 August 1817, during which Jefferson devotes much time and energy to founding Central College, the predecessor of the University of Virginia.

Hardcover | 2015 | $125.00 / £85.00

The Papers of Thomas Jefferson: Volume 41: 11 July to 15 November 1803<br>Thomas Jefferson<br>Edited by Barbara B. Oberg The Papers of Thomas Jefferson:
Volume 41: 11 July to 15 November 1803
Thomas Jefferson
Edited by Barbara B. Oberg
The Louisiana Purchase dominates the months covered in this volume. Jefferson departs for Monticello to enjoy a needed respite after the busy three and a half months he has just spent in the nation’s capital. Shortly before leaving Washington, he has a last meeting with his cabinet, after which he issues a proclamation to reconvene Congress on 17 October, three weeks early. It is the “great and weighty” business of the French government’s stunning offer to transfer all of the Louisiana Territory to the United States that necessitates this important gathering.

Hardcover | 2015 | $125.00 / £85.00

Prague, Capital of the Twentieth Century: A Surrealist History<br>Derek Sayer Prague, Capital of the Twentieth Century:
A Surrealist History
Derek Sayer
“[A] pleasure to read, luscious in a sultry kind of way.”–Marci Shore, Times Literary Supplement

Paperback | 2015 | $27.95 / £19.95
Hardcover | 2013 | $35.00 / £24.95
eBook available

Sleepwalking into a New World: The Emergence of Italian City Communes in the Twelfth Century<br>Chris Wickham Sleepwalking into a New World:
The Emergence of Italian City Communes in the Twelfth Century
Chris Wickham
“Wickham’s expert analysis and meticulous academic approach build on previous. Limited examinations and substantial documentation to turn established research on its head, as he presents a fresh look into how communes in the mid-12th century successfully prepared Italian power structures for the cultural significance they would later have.”–Publishers Weekly

Hardcover | 2015 | $29.95 / £19.95
eBook available

Books released during the week of December 29, 2014
The Age of the Crisis of Man: Thought and Fiction in America, 1933–1973<br>Mark Greif The Age of the Crisis of Man:
Thought and Fiction in America, 1933–1973
Mark Greif
“‘One of the striking features of the discourse of man to modern eyes, in a sense the most striking, is how unreadable it is, how tedious, how unhelpful. The puzzle is why it is unreadable.’ Thus, Mark Greif in his exhilarating study The Age of the Crisis of Man: Thought and Fiction in America 1933-1973. By ‘the discourse of man’ Greif means the vast midcentury literature on human dignity, from Being and Nothingness, to the ‘Family of Man’ photo exhibition, to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights–a discourse that Greif interrogates with verve, erudition, sympathy, and suspicion, and that he follows into the fiction of our time.”–Lorin Stein, Paris Review

Hardcover | 2014 | $29.95 / £19.95
eBook available

The Devil Wins: A History of Lying from the Garden of Eden to the Enlightenment<br>Dallas G. Denery II The Devil Wins:
A History of Lying from the Garden of Eden to the Enlightenment
Dallas G. Denery II
“In this exquisitely written book, Denery draws on centuries of rumination on the moral issues surrounding lying to address the question of how we should live in a fallen world. The serpent in the Garden of Eden led humankind astray with lies. The Devil is the father of lies. Premodern sources agonized constantly over the act of lying. Denery not only superbly narrates the long history of this obsession, but also locates the conditions that reveal an Enlightenment shift toward a not entirely comfortable modernity.”–William Chester Jordan, Princeton University

Hardcover | 2014 | $29.95 / £19.95
eBook available

The Fascinating World of Graph Theory<br>Arthur Benjamin, Gary Chartrand & Ping Zhang The Fascinating World of Graph Theory
Arthur Benjamin, Gary Chartrand & Ping Zhang
“In this attractive introduction to the world of graphs, the authors entice and enthuse readers through a number of fun problems which present various aspects of the subject. Many of these problems are familiar–the four-color problem, the Königsberg Bridge problem, and ‘instant insanity’–while others are less well known or of a more serious nature. This book can be used in different ways–as an entertaining book on recreational mathematics or as an accessible textbook on graph theory. I warmly recommend it.”–Robin J. Wilson, author of Introduction to Graph Theory

Hardcover | 2014 | $29.95 / £19.95
eBook available

The Match Girl and the Heiress<br>Seth Koven The Match Girl and the Heiress
Seth Koven
“Rutgers University historian Koven (Slumming) has fashioned a scholarly yet highly readable jewel that tackles the big issues of early-20th-century England in an intimate way. Through the lives of Muriel Lester and Nellie Dowell, he brilliantly illuminates the growth of global capitalism, a revolutionary ‘God is love’ Christian theology, war and pacifism, feminism and sexuality, and class and gender relations.”–Publishers Weekly, starred review

Hardcover | 2014 | $35.00 / £24.95
eBook available

Mathematics without Apologies: Portrait of a Problematic Vocation<br>Michael Harris Mathematics without Apologies:
Portrait of a Problematic Vocation
Michael Harris
“Michael Harris writes with all-absorbing exuberance and intensity about what it feels like from the inside to do mathematics, and he succeeds, for the uninitiated like myself, in conveying the motives and the pleasure that have impelled him and his precursors and peers to seek to understand. But Mathematics without Apologies is many things besides: it combines thoughtful personal memoir, sharp social chronicle, entertaining literary analysis, and jeux d’esprit reflecting on formulae for love or on the hidden structures in the fiction of Thomas Pynchon. Most importantly, however, Harris issues a clarion call for the autonomy of research in our time. He defends–fiercely and lucidly–the pursuit of understanding without recourse to commercial interests or other principles of utility. This is an original and passionate book; Michael Harris has fashioned much-needed luminous arguments for the cause of intellectual independence.”Marina Warner, professor of English and creative writing, Birkbeck, University of London, and author of Stranger Magic: Charmed States and the Arabian Nights

Hardcover | 2014 | $29.95 / £19.95
eBook available

Playing at Acquisitions: Behavioral Option Games<br>Han Smit & Thras Moraitis Playing at Acquisitions:
Behavioral Option Games
Han Smit & Thras Moraitis
“This book brings together the best insights from strategy, corporate finance, and psychology to explore in a real, fine-grained, and practical way how to derive winning acquisition strategies using both real options and game theory to optimally time and leverage investments. It is a must-read for serious practitioners and those aiming to get into the game.”–Dan Lovallo, University of California, Berkeley

Hardcover | 2014 | $55.00 / £37.95
eBook available

The Princeton Companion to Atlantic History<br>Edited by Joseph C. Miller Vincent Brown, Jorge Cañizares-Esguerra, Laurent Dubois & Karen Ordhal Kupperman, associate editors The Princeton Companion to Atlantic History
Edited by Joseph C. Miller
Vincent Brown, Jorge Cañizares-Esguerra, Laurent Dubois & Karen Ordhal Kupperman, associate editors
Between the fifteenth and nineteenth centuries, the connections among Africa, the Americas, and Europe transformed world history—through maritime exploration, commercial engagements, human migrations and settlements, political realignments and upheavals, cultural exchanges, and more. This book, the first encyclopedic reference work on Atlantic history, takes an integrated, multicontinental approach that emphasizes the dynamics of change and the perspectives and motivations of the peoples who made it happen. The entries—all specially commissioned for this volume from an international team of leading scholars—synthesize the latest scholarship on central themes, including economics, migration, politics, war, technologies and science, the physical environment, and culture.

Hardcover | 2014 | $65.00 / £44.95
eBook available

Sea of Storms: A History of Hurricanes in the Greater Caribbean from Columbus to Katrina<br>Stuart B. Schwartz Sea of Storms:
A History of Hurricanes in the Greater Caribbean from Columbus to Katrina
Stuart B. Schwartz
“In this magisterial study, the histories of colonization, state formation, empire, slavery, and emancipation come into sharp relief when viewed through the eye of the hurricane. Sea of Storms is a tightly focused study that delivers perspectives as sweeping as the history of the Caribbean itself.”–Jorge Cañizares-Esguerra, University of Texas at Austin

Hardcover | 2014 | $35.00 / £24.95
eBook available

Sexing the World: Grammatical Gender and Biological Sex in Ancient Rome<br>Anthony Corbeill Sexing the World:
Grammatical Gender and Biological Sex in Ancient Rome
Anthony Corbeill
“Demonstrating wide reading and a command of lesser-known texts and sources, this enjoyable book offers a highly original and interesting look at gender in both Latin grammar and Roman society. It explores the grammar of nouns where gender is fluid, and takes into consideration poetic intent and Roman cultural-sexual history. There is no other book quite like it.”–Michael Fontaine, Cornell University

Hardcover | 2014 | $45.00 / £30.95
eBook available

Boris likes fairy tales, too!

The Brothers Grimm can now count the Mayor of London among their growing list of fans. At a recent book signing in Oxford, Boris Johnson proclaimed that he had heard good things about The Original Folk and Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm, which came out in November and has proved a popular choice for Christmas. In fact, the Mayor of London said that he would be giving a copy of the book as a Christmas gift himself, although the identity of the lucky recipient remains a mystery!

Boris

The Original Folk and Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm is the first ever full translation into English of Jacob and Wilhelm’s original versions of their famous tales. Gory, dark, disturbing and, yes, grim, the originals were first published in 1812 and 1815 and have since been overshadowed by the later versions of the stories that we know today.

The lastest in physics and astrophysics

Be among the first to browse and download our new physics and astrophysics catalog!

You may also sign up with ease to be notified of forthcoming titles at http://press.princeton.edu/subscribe/. (Your e-mail address will remain confidential!)

If you’re heading to the annual American Astronomical Society meeting in Seattle, WA January 4th–8th, come visit us at booth 413. See you there!

New Economics and Finance Catalog!

Be among the first to browse and download our new economics and finance catalog!

Of particular interest is Climate Shock: The Economic Consequences of a Hotter Planet by Gernot Wagner and Martin Weitzman. If you had a 10 percent chance of having a fatal car accident, you’d take necessary precautions. If your finances had a 10 percent chance of suffering a severe loss, you’d reevaluate your assets. So if we know the world is warming and there’s a 10 percent chance this might eventually lead to a catastrophe beyond anything we could imagine, why aren’t we doing more about climate change right now? We insure our lives against an uncertain future—why not our planet?

In Climate Shock, Wagner and Weitzman explore in lively, clear terms the likely repercussions of a hotter planet, drawing on and expanding from work previously unavailable to general audiences. They show that the longer we wait to act, the more likely an extreme event will happen. A city might go underwater. A rogue nation might shoot particles into the Earth’s atmosphere, geoengineering cooler temperatures. Zeroing in on the unknown extreme risks that may yet dwarf all else, the authors look at how economic forces that make sensible climate policies difficult to enact, make radical would-be fixes like geoengineering all the more probable. What we know about climate change is alarming enough. What we don’t know about the extreme risks could be far more dangerous. Wagner and Weitzman help readers understand that we need to think about climate change in the same way that we think about insurance—as a risk management problem, only here on a global scale.

More of our leading titles in economics and finance can be found in the catalog. You may also sign up with ease to be notified of forthcoming titles at http://press.princeton.edu/subscribe/. (Your e-mail address will remain confidential!)

If you’re heading to the annual Allied Social Sciences Association meeting in Boston, MA January 3rd–5th, come visit us at booth 314.

Join us Sunday, January 4th at 4:00 p.m. for a glass of wine to celebrate the publication of Mastering ‘Metrics: The Path from Cause to Effect. See you there!

New History Catalog!

Be among the first to browse and download our new history catalog!

Of particular interest is Konrad Jarausch’s Out of Ashes: A New History of Europe in the Twentieth Century. A stunning achievement, Out of Ashes explores the paradox of the European encounter with modernity in the twentieth century, shedding new light on why it led to cataclysm, inhumanity, and self-destruction, but also social justice, democracy, and peace.

Also be sure to note Ronald Suny’s “They Can Live in the Desert but Nowhere Else”: A History of the Armenian Genocide. Starting in early 1915, the Ottoman Turks began deporting and killing hundreds of thousands of Armenians in the first major genocide of the twentieth century. By the end of the First World War, the number of Armenians in what would become Turkey had been reduced by ninety percent—more than a million people. A century later, the Armenian Genocide remains controversial but relatively unknown, overshadowed by later slaughters and the chasm separating Turkish and Armenian versions of events. In this definitive narrative history, Suny cuts through nationalist myths, propaganda, and denial to provide an unmatched account of when, how, and why the atrocities of 1915–16 were committed.

And don’t miss out on Peter Baldwin’s The Copyright Wars: Three Centuries of Trans-Atlantic Battle. Today’s copyright wars can seem unprecedented. Sparked by the digital revolution that has made copyright—and its violation—a part of everyday life, fights over intellectual property have pitted creators, Hollywood, and governments against consumers, pirates, Silicon Valley, and open-access advocates. But while the digital generation can be forgiven for thinking the dispute between, for example, the publishing industry and Google is completely new, the copyright wars in fact stretch back three centuries—and their history is essential to understanding today’s battles. The Copyright Wars—the first major trans-Atlantic history of copyright from its origins to today—tells this important story.

More of our leading titles in history can be found in the catalog. You may also sign up with ease to be notified of forthcoming titles at http://press.princeton.edu/subscribe/. (Your e-mail address will remain confidential!)

If you’re heading to the annual American Historical Association meeting in New York, NY January 2nd–5th, come visit us at booth 305.

Join us Sunday, January 4th 4:30–5:30 p.m. for a glass of wine to celebrate the publication of The Princeton Companion to Atlantic History and The Match Girl and the Heiress. See you there!

New Philosophy Catalog!

Be among the first to browse and download our new philosophy catalog!

Of particular interest is Jason Stanley’s How Propaganda Works. Our democracy today is fraught with political campaigns, lobbyists, liberal media, and Fox News, all using language to influence the way we think and reason about public issues. Even so, many of us believe that propaganda and manipulation aren’t problems for us—not in the way they were for the totalitarian societies of the mid-twentieth century. In How Propaganda Works, Stanley demonstrates that more attention needs to be paid. He examines how propaganda operates subtly, how it undermines democracy—particularly the ideals of democratic deliberation and equality—and how it has damaged democracies of the past.

Also be sure to note Carlos Fraenkel’s Teaching Plato in Palestine: Philosophy in a Divided World. This book is part intellectual travelogue, part plea for integrating philosophy into our personal and public life. Philosophical toolkit in tow, Fraenkel invites readers on a tour around the world as he meets students at Palestinian and Indonesian universities, lapsed Hasidic Jews in New York, teenagers from poor neighborhoods in Brazil, and the descendants of Iroquois warriors in Canada. They turn to Plato and Aristotle, al-Ghazālī and Maimonides, Spinoza and Nietzsche for help to tackle big questions: Does God exist? Is piety worth it? Can violence be justified? What is social justice and how can we get there? Who should rule? And how shall we deal with the legacy of colonialism? Fraenkel shows how useful the tools of philosophy can be—particularly in places fraught with conflict—to clarify such questions and explore answers to them.

And don’t miss out on Seana Valentine Shiffrin’s Speech Matters: On Lying, Morality, and the Law. To understand one another as individuals and to fulfill the moral duties that require such understanding, we must communicate with each other. We must also maintain protected channels that render reliable communication possible, a demand that, Shiffrin argues, yields a prohibition against lying and requires protection for free speech. This book makes a distinctive philosophical argument for the wrong of the lie and provides an original account of its difference from the wrong of deception.

More of our leading titles in philosophy can be found in the catalog. You may also sign up with ease to be notified of forthcoming titles at http://press.princeton.edu/subscribe/. (Your e-mail address will remain confidential!)

If you’re heading to the annual American Philosophical Association meeting in Philadelphia, PA December 27th-30th, come visit us at the Princeton booth. See you there!

The “It’s not too late to get a cool present,” edition of holiday round-ups

Christmas is well underway in many parts of the world, but it isn’t too late to find the perfect gift for the ancient history buff or naturalist on your list. You can “gift” apps through the app store, and we have a couple of recommendations.

Barrington-atlas-app-icon
Download at iTunes App Store
The Barrington Atlas App takes all the wonderful maps from the coveted print version of The Barrington Atlas (list price $425.00) and puts them into a digital, searchable, zoomable, bookmarkable, fits-in-the-palm-of-your-handable format for just $19.99. If you have a colleague, friend, or family member who relishes their National Geographic and Smithsonian magazine collections and plans vacations around the latest exhibit at the British Museum — this app will not disappoint. Don’t just take our word for it. The New York Times Book Review’s Applied Reading columnist, Jude Biersdorfer, wrote of the app: “Available in book form since 2000, this impressive tome has been converted into an engrossing iPad app. Spanning 16 centuries, it includes the text from the print edition and all 102 maps, now as high-resolution images that fill the screen. . . . Getting lost here is educational.”If the recipient possesses more of a natural history bent, we have two recommendations:
Warbler-app-iconDownload at iTunes App Store First, The Warbler Guide App launched this week and it will wow with 3D visuals, comparison song files, and expert information from Tom Stephenson and Scott Whittle, co-authors of the award-winning “bible” of warblers, The Warbler Guide. Maybe you know someone who already owns the book and you’re not sure if the app will be useful? This video explains why the app will be a sure-fire hit with any fan of the book. Don’t just take our word for it: Dan Tallman writes, “This amazing app is available at the iTunes Store for $12.99 for iPhones and iPads , and it is worth every penny….Some people say, ‘There is nothing new on this Earth,’ but they have never seen The Warbler Guide App. This app is a fast, intuitive way to identify the warblers of the United States and Canada by visuals and/or song. You can quickly access images of all species with comparisons to similar warblers.”
Mammals-of-North-America-APP icon
Download at iTunes App Store
Download at iTunes App Store
If you’re looking for something with fewer feathers, we recommend the Mammals of North America app (iTunes | Android). This app is based on our best-selling guide of the same name from Roland W. Kays & Don E. Wilson. The app featured everything from bears and mice to beavers and racoons. Users will admire the stellar illustrations and enjoy listening to animal sounds. This is your chance to find out what the fox really does say, and the skunk, and the badger. Well you get the point. 

Fragile by Design, The Limits of Partnership, and others among Bloomberg Businessweek’s favorite books of 2014

Happy new year 2014It’s nearing the end of the year and that means everyone is taking a look back at the best and worst of the past twelve months. Bloomberg Businessweek recently published a “Best Books of ’14,” list to their site, and five Princeton University Press titles were selected as some of the best of the year!

Mervyn King, former governor of the Bank of England, got things going; “Charles Calomiris and Stephen Haber’s Fragile by Design is a magnificent study of the economics and politics of banking.”fragile

Bjorn Wahlroos, Chairman of Nordea Bank AB (NDA), selected Edmund S. Phelps’s Mass Flourishing: How Grassroots Innovation Created Jobs, Challenge, and Change and wrote, “[Phelps] redraws many political front lines and provides us with an answer to those who believe more public funding for investment and innovation is the road forward for our stagnant economies. It is a marvelous book that deserves to be read by everyone, but particularly by those entrusted with the design of the European future.”mass flourishing

Jeffrey Lacker, president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond selected both Fragile by Design: The Political Origins of Banking Crises and Scarce Credit by Calomiris and Haber and Human Capitalism: How Economic Growth has Made Us Smarter–and More Unequal by Brink Lindsey as his must reads of the year.human

“[Fragile by Design is] hands down the best single book for understanding the historical journey that laid the groundwork for the financial crisis.”

“[Lindsey] argues the case that economic inequality is more deeply intertwined with human capital accumulation and the process of economic growth than you thought.”

Dan Fuss, vice chairman of Loomis Sayles & Co., named The Limits of Partnership: U.S.-Russian Relations in the Twenty-First Century by Angela E. Stent as his choice for favorite book of 2014, while Satyajit Das, author of Traders, Guns, and Money selected The Transformation of the World: A Global History of the Nineteenth Century by Jürgen Osterhammel to round out the list of PUP titles. “Professor Jorgen Osterhammel’s fine book is anything but a linear recitation of events. Instead, it swoops, shimmies, and carves ellipses and spirals through the facts to give readers a remarkable picture of the 19th century, which has shaped much of the present world.”

angela stent world

Congratulations to all the PUP authors on the list! The rest of the article can be found, here.

 

“On the twelfth day…” The Twelve Grimm Days of Christmas

We are delighted to share these stories from The Complete First Edition of The Original Folk and Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm with our readers. This series will run for 12 days and each story is accompanied by original art from Andrea Dezsö.

twelve brothers

The Twelve Brothers

Once upon a time there was a king who had twelve children, all boys. Moreover, he didn’t want to have a daughter and said to his wife: “If you give birth to our thirteenth child, and it’s a girl, I shall have the twelve boys killed. However, if it’s a boy, then they’ll all remain alive and stay together.” The queen thought of talking him out of this, but the king refused to hear anything more about this topic.

“If everything turns out like I said, they must die. I’d rather chop off their heads myself than let a girl be among them.”

The queen was sad about this because she loved her sons with all her heart and didn’t know how she could save them. Finally, she went to the youngest, who was her favorite, and revealed to him what the king had decided.

“Dearest child,” she said, “go into the forest with your eleven brothers. Stay there, and don’t come home. One of you should keep watch on a tree and look over here toward the tower. If I give birth to a little son, I’ll raise a white flag on top of the tower. However, if it’s a little daughter, I’ll raise a red flag. If you all see that it’s red, then save yourselves. Flee into the wide world, and may our dear Lord protect you. I’ll get up every night and pray that you won’t freeze in the winter and are able to warm yourselves by a fire and that when it’s hot in the summer, you can rest in a cool forest and sleep.”

After she gave her blessing to her sons, they went out into the forest, where they frequently looked toward the tower. One of them had to sit on top of a high tree and constantly keep watch. Soon a flag was hoisted, but it wasn’t a white one. It was a blood-red flag that foreshadowed their doom. As soon as the brothers caught sight of it, they all became angry and cried out: “Why should we lose our lives because of a girl?”

Then they all swore to remain in the middle of the forest and to keep on their guard, and if a maiden were to appear, they would kill her without mercy.

Soon after this they searched for a cave where the forest was the darkest, and that’s where they began to live. Every morning eleven of the brothers went off to hunt. One of them had to remain home, cook, and keep house. Whenever they encountered a maiden, she was treated without mercy and lost her life. This is how they lived for many years.

In the meantime their little sister grew up and was the only child left at home. One day there was a large amount of washing to do, and among the clothes there were twelve shirts for boys.

“Whose shirts are these?” the princess asked the washerwoman. “They’re much too small for my father.”

It was then that the washerwoman told her that she had once had twelve brothers, but they had mysteriously gone away. Nobody knew where because the king had wanted to have them killed, and the twelve shirts belonged to the twelve brothers. The little sister was astonished that she had never heard of her twelve brothers, and during the afternoon as the clothes were drying and she was sitting in the meadow, she recalled the words of the washerwoman. After giving considerable thought to what she had heard, she stood up, took the twelve shirts, and went into the forest where her brothers were living.

The little sister made her way straight to the cave that served as her brothers’ dwelling. Eleven of them were out hunting, and only one of them who had to cook was at home. When he caught sight of the maiden, he composed himself and drew his sword.

“Kneel down! Your red blood will flow this very second!”

But the maiden pleaded: “Dear sir, let me live. I’ll stay with you and serve you honestly. I’ll cook and keep house.”

She spoke these words to the youngest brother, and he took pity on her because of her beauty and spared her life. Later, when his eleven brothers returned home and were astonished to find a maiden alive in their cave, he said to them: “Dear brothers, this girl came to our cave, and when I wanted to cut her to pieces, she pleaded for her life so much and said that she would serve us faithfully and keep house that I spared her life.”

The others thought that this would be a great benefit to them because now all twelve of them could go hunting, and they were satisfied with this arrangement. Then the maiden showed them the twelve shirts and told them that she was their sister. Indeed, they were all very happy about this and were glad that they hadn’t killed her.

Now the little sister took over all the household chores, and when the brothers went out hunting, she gathered wood and herbs, kept the fire going, made up the beds nice and white and clean, and did everything with zeal and without getting tired.

One day, when she was finished with all the work, she took a walk in the woods and came to a place where there were twelve large beautiful white lilies. Since they pleased her so much, she plucked all twelve of them. No sooner did she do this than an old woman stood before her.

“Oh, my daughter,” she said, “why didn’t you let the twelve budding flowers just stand there? They’re your twelve brothers. Now they’ve been changed into ravens and are lost forever.”

The little sister began to weep and said, “Isn’t there any way that I can save them?”

“No, there isn’t any way in the world except one that’s so difficult you won’t be able to rescue them. You must spend the next twelve years with- out speaking. If you say one single word, even if there’s only an hour left, everything will be in vain, and your brothers will die that very moment.”

Well, the little sister responded by climbing a tall tree in the forest, where she took a place. She wanted to sit there twelve years without say- ing a word to free her brothers. But it so happened that a king was out riding and hunting in the forest, and as he rode by the tree, his dog stood still and barked. So the king stopped, looked up, and was very amazed by the princess’s beauty. He called to her and asked her whether she wanted to become his wife. However, she remained silent and only nodded a bit with her head. So the king himself dismounted, helped her down from the tree, and lifted her up before him onto his horse. Then he brought her home to his castle. Meanwhile the princess did not utter one word, and the king thought that she was mute. They would have lived happily with one another if it hadn’t been for the king’s mother, who began to slander the young queen in front of her son.

“She’s a common beggar that you’ve dug up from nowhere, and she’s doing the most disgraceful things behind your back!”

Since the young queen couldn’t defend herself, the king was led astray and finally believed what his mother said. So, he sentenced his wife to death, and a enormous fire was built in the courtyard, where she was to be burned to death.

Soon the queen was standing in the flames that grazed the fringes of her dress. One minute was left before the twelve years of her silence would be completed. There was a noise in the air, and twelve ravens swooped down into the courtyard. As soon as they touched the ground, they became twelve handsome princes who instantly put out the fire’s flames and led their sister to safety. Then she spoke once again and told the king how everything had happened and how she had to save her twelve brothers. Indeed, they were all pleased that everything turned out so well.

Now they had to decide what they should do with the evil mother-in- law. Well, they stuck her into a barrel full of boiling oil and poisonous snakes, and she died a ghastly death.


bookjacket

The Original Folk and Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm:
The Complete First Edition
Jacob & Wilhelm Grimm, Translated and edited by Jack Zipes
Illustrated by Andrea Dezsö
Art credit: Andrea Dezsö