Time for Gardening

Calling green thumb gardeners and novices alike—sprouting season is finally here. After the winter thaw, it is time to break out the trowels, shears, and your favorite nature guides. Princeton brings you five comprehensive titles to accompany this year’s gardening season. From bees and other bugs to all things botanical, we invite you to peruse this collection for yourself.

k7713As we find ourselves tilling our garden beds and anxiously awaiting the first sprouts, inevitably our hard work will be swarmed upon by those infamous invaders: garden pests. But which insects are bad bugs and which ones are good? How can you identify the insect that is eating your green peppers or tomatoes? Garden Insects of North America: The Ultimate Guide to Backyard Bugs by Whitney Cranshaw is the most comprehensive and user-friendly guide to the common insects and mites affecting yard and garden plants in North America.  In a manner no previous book has come close to achieving, through full-color photos and concise, clear, scientifically accurate text, it describes the vast majority of species associated with shade trees and shrubs, turfgrass, flowers or ornamental plants, vegetables, and fruits– 1,420 or them, including crickets, katydids, fruit flies, mealybugs, moths, maggots, borers, aphids, ants, bees and many, many more. For particularly abundant bugs adept at damaging garden plants, management tips are also included.

k10219For more on your garden’s fuzzier tenants, check out Princeton’s new guide, Bumble Bees of North America: An Identification Guide by Paul H. Williams, Robbin W. Thorp, Leif L. Richardson, and Sheila R. Colla. Learn how to identify bumble bees and how to attract them to your yard with this landmark publication. Gardeners will delight to discover chapters on “Attracting Bumble Bees” and “Bumble Bee Forage.” The authors describe how to insure your garden is full of the food sources, nest sites, and overwintering sites that bumble bees need, while a region by region listing of bumble bee foraging plants allows gardeners to easily plan bumble bee-friendly landscapes. Interested in learning more about bumble bees? Start reading the Introduction to Bumble Bees of North America here.

k9668This next book provides an in-depth look at spring-blooming wildflowers of the Northeast, from old favorites to lesser-known species. The exquisitely illustrated Spring Wildflowers of the Northeast: A Natural History by Carol Gracie features more than 500 full-color photos in a stunning large-sized format and delves deep into the life histories, lore, and cultural uses of more than 35 plant species. The rich narrative covers topics such as the naming of wildflowers; the reasons for taxonomic changes; pollination of flowers and dispersal of seeds; uses by Native Americans; related species in other parts of the world; herbivores, plant pathogens, and pests; medicinal uses; and wildflower references in history, literature, and art.

Are you ditching the garden gloves this season? Fear not—for nature lovers of all kinds, we bring you Trees of Western North America and Trees of Eastern North America by Richard Spellenberg, Christopher J. Earle & Gil Nelson.  Covering 630 and 825 species respectively, these are the most comprehensive, best illustrated, and easiest-to-use books of their kind. The easy-to-read descriptions present details of size, shape, growth habit, bark, leaves, flowers, fruit, flowering and fruiting times, habitat, and range. With superior descriptions, thousands of meticulous color paintings by David More, range maps that provide a thumbnail view of distribution for each native species, and an introduction to tree identification, forest ecology, and plant classification and structure, these books are a must have for anyone interested in learning more about the trees all around them. You can see what Trees of Eastern North America is like by checking out a sample entry here.

Capture

With the gardening season upon us, It’s helpful to be well informed before hitting the flower beds. We invite you to explore these titles on insects, flowers and trees from Princeton University Press to make the most of your gardening and time outdoors.

The fourth annual Princeton in Europe Lecture — Professor Diarmaid MacCulloch asks ‘What if Arianism had won?’

The most noticeable and remarkable thing about Western Europe in what we call the Middle Ages is its cultural and religious unity, united by a common alignment with the Pope in Rome, and a common language for worship and scholarship. Western Europeans tend to take this united medieval phase of their history for granted, but it is unique in human history for a region to be so dominated by a single form of monotheistic religion and its accompanying culture for a thousand-year period. The dominance of the Church which looked to the Bishop of Rome was a freak in human experience, albeit a freak with profound consequences for the present day.

With this exercise in counterfactual history, Diarmaid MacCulloch draws on his experience of writing and filming an overview history of Christianity to consider how easily matters might have been different in the Christian West. He identifies Martin of Tours as a key figure, but also speculates on the perfectly plausible event of an Arian outcome to Western Christianity’s emergence from the ruins of the Western Roman Empire.

For more information about this Lecture Series: http://press.princeton.edu/europe/content/pages/board/events/

Untranslatable Tuesdays – Polis

Cassin polis graphic

To mark the publication of Dictionary of Untranslatables: A Philosophical Lexicon, we are delighted to share a series of playful graphics by our design team which illustrate some of the most interesting terms from the Dictionary. For  week three in the “Untranslatable Tuesdays” series we present Polis (Greek):

POLIS, POLITEIA (GREEK)

ENGLISH               city-state, state, society, nation

FRENCH                 cité, État, société, nation

What’s your favourite untranslatable word?

 

A bird book goes to Africa, part 2

Last year we posted about Rick Ludkin’s trip to Kenya to teach students about their avian neighbors. He returned this winter with more copies of The Birds of Kenya and Northern Tanzania, to continue his mission, though with a slight twist. Here’s part of his report:

This year was quite different from last year. In 2013 I spent most of my time with grade 6, 7, and 8 students teaching them how to use a field guide and binoculars and how to band birds we were catching. This year I did the same thing except that much more time was spent with the adults in the community. [Don't worry, the students weren't neglected; we ran the Bird Club every weekend for them.]

Working with the adult community was incredibly exciting. Most of them were completely unaware of the richness of their birdlife – and they began to take pride in the great variety around them. Most of the them had never used binoculars and it was a treat to watch their wonderment as they figured out how to use them. But I think it was their unbridled enthusiasm for their avian heritage that was the most rewarding for me.

Here are some pictures showing some of the action in the various events we ran for them. I trained a group of 5 local folks to help me with the banding, to run the bird club when I’m in Canada, and to run the workshops for the community.

Click the thumbnails above to view larger photos.

It is incredibly rewarding to know copies of The Birds of Kenya and Northern Tanzania are used in this positive outreach. Thank you, Rick, for all you are doing!

To learn more about Rick’s work in Kenya and his birding adventures in North America, check out his blog, Ruthven Park Nature Blog.

 

An Alternative Passover Menu from Merry “Corky” White, author of Cooking for Crowds

Many family memories of Passover include delicious shared food experiences. I asked Merry “Corky” White, the reigning expert on Cooking for Crowds, for advice on how to shake up the traditional fare and introduce some new flavors and ideas to the Passover table. Here is her alternative Passover menu.

white-m[1]Forget the brisket–or relegate it to a nice memory of a great aunt who did it well–and choose a Belgian beef stew– Carbonnades Flamandes. Serve with small boiled potatoes.

A second idea, equally good and homey is the Greek Beef Stifatho, made either with beef or with lamb, which has some Sephardic possibilities, in the cinnamon and cumin. Leave out the feta if you are keeping kosher. If rice can be on your menu, serve it with rice: if not, saffron-tinged mashed potatoes with olive oil.

Stuffed Cabbage would be also a nice dish, but use ground beef and substitute 3 Tb olive oil for salt pork in the version for six people.

The best possible dessert for Passover is a flourless hazelnut torte and strawberries. Unfortunately I have no flourless tortes in the book but if it is permissible to use dairy in a meat menu, then Strawberries with Sabayon Sauce will do beautifully. Or the Toasted Almond Parfait, again, if dairy is permitted.

If you try any of these recipes, please leave us a note below. We’d love to hear from you!

Quick Questions for Diane Coyle, author of GDP: A Brief but Affectionate History

Coyle_GDP_author photoDiane Coyle is an economist specializing in the economics of new technologies and in competition policy. She has missions to improve both the public understanding of economics and the teaching of economics to new generations. A Visiting Research Fellow at the Smith School of Enterprise and the Environment, University of Oxford, her previous books include The Economics of Enough and The Soulful Science: What Economists Really Do and Why It Matters.

We have just published GDP: A Brief but Affectionate History (“[A] little charmer of a book…” according to the Wall Street Journal). 

She writes an awesome blog called The Enlightened Economist that should be on your daily must-read list.

Now, on to the questions!

 

What inspired you to get into your field?

A brilliant tutor. I went to university with the aim of becoming a philosopher, planning for a career sitting in Parisian cafes thinking deep thoughts. But Peter Sinclair, now Professor of Economics at the University of Birmingham, inspired me with his enthusiasm for economics and its power to explain and perhaps even improve the world.


The way people think of ‘the economy’ has changed so much over time.


What is the biggest misunderstanding people have about what economists do?

Most people think that economics is mainly macroeconomic forecasting, and they think most economics is based on the assumption that we are all selfish and ultra-rational, and only care about money. A generation ago, a narrow approach to economics did dominate the subject, and there are still some economists who don’t see anything wrong with the reductionist version, but most of the economics practiced today is far, far more in touch with the ‘real world’. Unfortunately, the update hasn’t yet reached economics textbooks and courses – hence the importance of the INET CORE curriculum project.

What would you have been if not an economist?

A dancer – not that I’d have been good enough!

What was the most interesting thing you learned from writing GDP?

It was that the way people think of ‘the economy’ has changed so much over time. We have Angus Maddison’s figures based on calculations of GDP going back through time, but up until the mid-20th century this was not how people thought about the aggregate economy. GDP and Keynesian macroeconomics co-evolved.

What do you think is the book’s most important contribution?

To demystify GDP, which most people hear as gobbledygook on the news; and to remind or tell them that how we measure economic activity is the result of many conventions and judgments. There is no natural object called GDP out there – it is a human construction, and what it measures is not well-being or social welfare, but simply a specific definition of economic activity.

Describe your writing process. How long did it take you to finish your book? Where do you write?

I fit the research around day to day life but need to find chunks of time for writing. This means my patient family are used to me spending a couple of hours every day tapping away at my laptop when we’re on holiday. I managed one (short) book once on maternity leave, typing one handed with the baby on the other arm.


There is no natural object called GDP out there – it is a human construction.


Do you have advice for other authors?

Just start. Write a lot and read a lot, as writing is a craft skill. Read George Orwell on the English language if that’s the language you’re writing in. And for non-fiction, you have to find a system for organizing the ideas and material – I always find this the hardest part and there’s always a stage when I have pieces of paper with headings laid out over the floor of my study.

What are you reading right now?

Thomas Piketty’s Capital in the 21st Century, and The Infatuations by Javier Marias.

What is your next project?

I’m helping out on that project. I’m writing a new public policy economics course to teach to undergraduates at the University of Manchester. In terms of research, I’m interested in two aspects of digital change: the continuing reshaping of supply chains, through both organizational and geographic change; and the implementation of public policy. There’s no point doing a wonderful economic analysis of a policy issue if you don’t also think about the political economy and practicality of implementation.

 


 

bookjacket GDP: A Brief but Affectionate History
Diane CoyleHardcover | $19.95 / £13.95 | ISBN: 9780691156798
168 pp. | 5 1/2 x 8 1/2 | 2 halftones. 2 line illus. 2 tables.eBook | ISBN: 9781400849970

Reviews

Table of Contents

Sample the Introduction[PDF]

 
 
 
 
 

THIS IS MATH: Magic Squares, Circles, and Stars

If you have been following the opening of the windows in the Mathematical Awareness Month Poster, you might want to go back to window #1 and review Magic Squares. If you haven’t been there yet, please take a look at it. You will learn how to amaze your friends with your magical math abilities.

Magic squares come in many types, shapes, and sizes. Below you will see a magic square, a magic circle, and a magic star. If you would like to see hundreds more, you might want to check out The Zen of Magic Squares, Circles, and Stars: An Exhibition of Surprising Structures across Dimensions by Clifford Pickover.

Normal Magic Squares

This is a third-order normal magic square where all of the rows, columns, and diagonals add to 15.

 

squares

Is this the only solution to this magic square? Can you find others?

You could also have a 4 x 4 square or a 5 x 5 square and so on. How big of a square can you solve?

 

Magic Circles

Below you will see a magic circle composed of eight circles of four numbers each and the numbers on each circle all add to 18.  The thing that makes this magic circle special is that each number is at the intersection of four circles but no other point is common to the same four circles.

circles

Magic Stars

The magic star below is one of the simplest. They can get extremely complicated and also quite beautiful.

star

So, where’s the math?

Well, you should have noticed already that there are numbers on this page. However, there is more to math than numbers. Let’s add at least one equation.

If we go back to the normal magic square you should know that all these magic squares have the same number of rows and columns, they are n2. The constant that is the same for every column, row, and diagonal is called the magic sum and we will call it M.  Now we can figure out what that constant should be. If we use our 3 x 3 square above, we know that n = 3. If we plug our n into the given formula below we will find what our constant has to be.

equation

 Since our n = 3, the formula says M = [3 (32 + 1)]/2, which simplifies to 15. For normal magic squares of order n =  4, 5, and 6 the magic constants are, respectively: 34, 65, and 111. What would M be for n = 8? See if you can solve this square. (The figure for the normal square is from Wikipedia.)

 

 

 

 

 

Book Launch for Art Evans’s Beetles of Eastern North America at Stir Crazy Cafe on May 23, 2014

Beetles of Eastern North America_Poster_04 11 2014

Princeton University Press’s best-selling audio books

The Five Elements of Effective ThinkingWe’re changing things up a bit. Each week we list the best-selling titles according to BookScan, but today we’re focusing on our audio titles. These are Princeton University Press’s best-selling audio books for the final quarter of 2013. Click through to listen to samples or to add them to your book queue.

  1. The 5 Elements of Effective Thinking by Edward Burger & Michael Starbird
  2. Women Don’t Ask by Linda Babcock and Sara Laschever
  3. Einstein and the Quantum by A. Douglas Stone
  4. Lost Enlightenment by S. Frederick Starr
  5. The Founders’ Dilemmas by Noam Wasserman

 

Announcing the #PhotoBigDay

big day logoThe brainchild of Tom Stephenson and Scott Whittle, co-authors of The Warbler Guide, the Photo Big Day presents a fun, new challenge for birders of all levels. Big Days are established fundraising events — teams of four birders head out to spot as many birds as they can in the span of 24 hours. The big difference this time around is that every sighting has to be documented on film.

We are proud to be co-sponsoring and supporting this effort and we hope you will check out more information at the links below. Good luck to Team Warbler!!!

MORE INFORMATION:
http://www.bigbirdphotoday.org Find out about big photo days, start your own team, raise funds, and more!

http://www.listing.aba.org The official home of big day lists, allows ABA members to upload their totals and results and see records for any area, and will also be live blogging and tweeting the Big Photo Day!

http://www.warblerguide.com Scott Whittle and Tom Stephenson’s site, with info on the Big Photo Day, and much more

http://www.facebook.com/warblerguide For more updates and live posts from Team Warbler

Follow us on Twitter @thewarblerguide

And find out more with #PhotoBigDay