#NewBooks from Princeton University Press

Books released during the week of October 27, 2014
Alan Turing: The Enigma: The Book That Inspired the Film <i>The Imitation Game</i><br>Andrew Hodges<br>With a foreword by Douglas Hofstadter and a new preface by the author Alan Turing: The Enigma:
The Book That Inspired the Film The Imitation Game
Andrew Hodges
With a foreword by Douglas Hofstadter and a new preface by the author


“One of the finest scientific biographies ever written.”–Jim Holt, New Yorker
Alan Turing's Systems of Logic: The Princeton Thesis<br>Edited and introduced by Andrew W. Appel Alan Turing’s Systems of Logic:
The Princeton Thesis
Edited and introduced by Andrew W. Appel


“This book presents the story of Turing’s work at Princeton University and includes a facsimile of his doctoral dissertation, ‘Systems of Logic Based on Ordinals,’ which he completed in 1936. The author includes a detailed history of Turing’s work in computer science and the attempts to ground the field in formal logic.”–Mathematics Teacher
One Hundred Semesters: My Adventures as Student, Professor, and University President, and What I Learned along the Way<br>William M. Chace One Hundred Semesters:
My Adventures as Student, Professor, and University President, and What I Learned along the Way
William M. Chace


“Chace here recounts a young man’s maturation and offers insight into the challenges of university administration. . . . Chace is a gifted storyteller, appealingly honest in analyzing what he did well and where he went wrong.”–Evelyn Beck, Library Journal
Birds of Australia: A Photographic Guide<br>Iain Campbell, Sam Woods & Nick Leseberg<br>With photography by Geoff Jones Birds of Australia:
A Photographic Guide
Iain Campbell, Sam Woods & Nick Leseberg
With photography by Geoff Jones


Birds of Australia is an excellent book. The text is comprehensive, the content is effectively organized and researched, and the scholarship is sound. The photographic plates are of a very high quality.”–Peter S. Lansley, senior ecologist, Brett Lane & Associates
The History of American Higher Education: Learning and Culture from the Founding to World War II<br>Roger L. Geiger The History of American Higher Education:
Learning and Culture from the Founding to World War II
Roger L. Geiger


“An encyclopedic history of American colleges and universities. . . . A well-researched, detailed tome.”–Kirkus Reviews

Rahul Sagar’s Secrets and Leaks wins 2014 Louis Brownlow Book Award

secretsThe National Academy of Public Administration (NAPA) recently announced its decision to award Rahul Sagar with the 2014 Louis Brownlow Book Award–the top book prize in the field of public administration.

Sagar’s book, Secrets and Leaks: The Dilemma of State Secrecy “examines the complex relationships among executive power, national security, and secrecy,”  and was chosen by the award committee for its “provocative and compelling arguments” and “for excellence in public administration literature, having provided new insights, fresh analysis and original ideas that contribute to the understanding of the role of public institutions and how they serve the public.” Sagar will receive his award (and give a plenary address) at the NAPA fall meeting in Washington, DC on Thursday, November 13th.

Congratulations Rahul Sagar on the awesome accomplishment!

Angela Stent on 25th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall and her book The Limits of Partnership

angela stentOn November 9th, 2014, the world will join Berlin in celebrating the 25th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall. Also on that day, PBS will air  Angela Stent’s American Forum discussion of the fall, as well as her book, The Limits of Partnership: U.S.-Russian Relations in the Twenty-First Century. The discussion, to take place today at 11:00AM at the University of Virginia Miller Center, can be live streamed here (for those of you who can’t wait until November 9th!).

Win a copy of Alan Turing: The Enigma, The Book That Inspired the Film The Imitation Game and tickets to see the movie

Hodges_AlanTuring movie tie inOn November 21, The Imitation Game will open in limited release. In the film, Benedict Cumberbatch stars as Alan Turing, the genius British mathematician, logician, cryptologist and computer scientist who led the charge to crack the German Enigma Code that helped the Allies win WWII. Turing went on to assist with the development of computers at the University of Manchester after the war, but was prosecuted by the UK government in 1952 for homosexual acts which the country deemed illegal. The film is inspired by the award-winning biography Alan Turing: The Enigma by Andrew Hodges.

To celebrate the release of the film, Princeton University Press is pleased to announce the publication of a new edition of the book with a movie still cover and new material from the author that brings the story current through Turing’s pardon by the Queen. Enter our giveaway below to win a copy of the new edition of the book AND a $25.00 Fandango gift certificate.

This giveaway will run from November 11 through November 24 and is open to residents of the U.S. and Canada, aged 18 and older. No purchase is necessary. If you prefer to enter via email, please send a note to blog@press.princeton.edu. Please see complete terms and conditions below.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Chris Hedges interviews Sheldon Wolin on The Real News.com

Journalist Chris Hedges of The Real News.com sat down with political philosopher and author of Democracy Incorporated: Managed Democracy and the Specter of Inverted Totalitarianism, Sheldon Wolin for a three hour interview to discuss the relationship between democracy and the citizenry. Broken up into roughly twenty minute segments, the first of eight interviews can be seen below.

 


bookjacket

Democracy Incorporated:
Managed Democracy and the Specter of Inverted Totalitarianism
Sheldon S. Wolin
With a new preface by the author

Winner of the 2008 Lannan Notable Book Award, Lannan Foundation

Derek Sayer’s Prague, winner of 2014 George L. Mosse Prize, American Historical Association

pragueThe American Historical Association recently announced its 2014 prize winners, and congratulations are in order (again) for Derek Sayer and his book Prague, Capital of the Twentieth Century: A Surrealist History. 

Prague will be the recipient of the George L. Mosse Prize, an award given to “an outstanding major work of extraordinary scholarly distinction, creativity, and originality in the intellectual and cultural history of Europe since 1500.” The award ceremony will be held at AHA’s Annual Meeting in New York on Friday, January 2nd.

For the full list of 2014 prize winners, click here. Again, congratulations to Derek Sayer on yet another noteworthy (and blog worthy) achievement!

PUP News of the World — October 23, 2014

NewsOfTheWorld_Banner

Each week we post a round-up of some of our most exciting national and international PUP book coverage. Reviews, interviews, events, articles — this is the spot for coverage of all things “PUP books” that took place in the last week. Enjoy!


Do Zombies Dream of Undead Sheep?

Just in time for your spooky Halloween week, the living dead has been spotted lurking in your local bookstore. But where? Check in the neuroscience section. Yes, you read that right.

With their endless wandering, lumbering gait, insatiable hunger, antisocial behavior, and apparently memory-less existence, zombies are the walking nightmares of our deepest fears. What do these characteristic behaviors reveal about the inner workings of the zombie mind? Could we diagnose zombism as a neurological condition by studying their behavior?

In Do Zombies Dream of Undead Sheep?: A Neuroscientific View of the Zombie Brain, neuroscientists and zombie enthusiasts Timothy Verstynen and Bradley Voytek apply their neuro-know-how to dissect the puzzle of what has happened to the zombie brain to make the undead act differently than their human prey.

Do Zombies Dream of Undead Sheep? is featured on Nerdist. Science editor Kyle Hill writes:

“Neuroscientists and zombie enthusiasts Timothy Verstynen and Bradley Voytek have recently come out with a new book called Do Zombies Dream of Undead Sheep?, in which they apply their neuroscience backgrounds to an investigation of the undead. It’s filled with pages of increasingly nerdy explorations of zombie behavior, and I highly recommend it, but what really caught my eye was the authors’ conclusion: All the walking dead have Consciousness Deficit Hypoactivity Disorder, or CDHD.”

Don’t be scared… check out this TED-Ed talk by Verstynen and Voytek (“Diagnosing a zombie: Brain and behavior”).

Do Zombies Dream of Undead Sheep? was also featured on the blog of the NPR-affiliate in San Diego KPBS and featured in U-T San Diego.

It’s all fun until someone gets bitten. While you still can, take a look at the introduction.

now 10.23

Cowardice

“Are you afraid to finish your book?” So begins a recent piece in the Times Higher Education by PUP author Chris Walsh. He continues:

My colleague was in the habit of needling his fellow scholars with this question. It struck particularly deep with me, because my book was about being afraid – or rather, it was about being excessively afraid and therefore failing to do what you should do. It was about cowardice.

For twenty years, Walsh has studied the topic of cowardice. What exactly is cowardice? When terrorists are called cowards, does it mean the same as when the term is applied to soldiers? And what, if anything, does cowardice have to do with the rest of us? His new book, fittingly named Cowardice: A Brief History, brings together sources from court-martial cases to literary and film classics such as Dante’s Inferno, The Red Badge of Courage, and The Thin Red Line, to recount the great harm that both cowards and the fear of seeming cowardly have done.

Walsh traces the idea of cowardice’s power to its evolutionary roots. But he also shows that this power has faded, most dramatically on the battlefield. Misconduct that earlier might have been punished as cowardice has more recently often been treated medically, as an adverse reaction to trauma, and Walsh explores a parallel therapeutic shift that reaches beyond war, into the realms of politics, crime, philosophy, religion, and love.

Cowardice is also reviewed on a Psychology Today blog. Glenn Altschuler writes:

“… a fresh and fascinating examination of the use of the term on – and off – the primal theater of cowardice, the battlefield.  Drawing on research in evolutionary biology as well as an informed interpretation of American history and literature, Walsh analyzes the relationship between courage and cowardice, the tendency to characterize men and not women as cowards, and the distinction between physical and moral cowardice.  Most important, Walsh argues, provocatively and persuasively, that over the past century the idea of cowardice has faded in significance, especially in military settings, and reappeared with somewhat different connotations.”

Check out this coverage of Cowardice in Inside Higher Ed, and preview the introduction for yourself.

 

Derek Sayer’s Prague receives honorable mention for the 2014 Wayne S. Vucinich Book Prize

pragueThe Wayne S. Vucinich Book Prize is awarded to the “most important contribution to Russian, Eurasian, and East European studies in any discipline in the humanities or social sciences,” by The Association for Slavic, Eastern European, and Eurasian Studies (ASEEES).

This year, Derek Sayer, author of Prague, Capital of the Twentieth Century: A Surrealist History, received an honorable mention for the award, along with Valerie Kivelson for her book Desperate Magic: The Moral Economy of Witchcraft in Seventeenth-Century Russia (Cornell University Press). Kate Brown and Plutopia: Nuclear Families, Atomic Cities, and the Great Soviet and American Plutonium Disasters (Oxford University Press) took home first place.

For the list of winners and honorable mentions for other ASEEES awards, click here. Congratulations to Derek Sayer on the noteworthy achievement!

Princeton University Press’s #NewBooks for this week

Books released during the week of October 14, 2014
Economic Interdependence and War<br>Dale C. Copeland Economic Interdependence and War
Dale C. Copeland

“A landmark study, Economic Interdependence and War presents a novel and compelling argument about trade expectations and the prospects for peace and war among the great powers. This well-written and accessible book buttresses its argument with an extraordinarily valuable historical analysis of great-power interactions from the 1790s to the present day, and a superior intellectual engagement of the quantitative literature.”–Joseph Grieco, Duke University

Relentless Reformer: Josephine Roche and Progressivism in Twentieth-Century America<br>Robyn Muncy Relentless Reformer
Josephine Roche and Progressivism in Twentieth-Century America
Robyn Muncy

“Josephine Roche finally has her due, thanks to Robyn Muncy’s sparkling political biography. Policewoman and business owner, labor-relations and public-health pioneer, political insider and female outsider, Roche emerges warts and all as a slayer of inequality. More than an exercise in recovery, Relentless Reformer challenges conventional wisdom on the detrimental impact of private welfare on public programs as it charts the persistence of a democratic, state-centric progressivism over the course of the twentieth century.”–Eileen Boris, Hull Professor of Feminist Studies, University of California, Santa Barbara

Clear and Simple as the Truth has author Steven Pinker’s seal of approval

simple truthSteven Pinker, author of How the Mind Works, The Blank Slate, and The Sense of Style: The Thinking Person’s Guide to Writing in the 21st Century, was recently featured in The New York Times Sunday Book Review to, well, review books (among other things). Pinker covers everything from the current books sitting beside his bed on his nightstand to his dream literary dinner party, but one question and answer caught the Press’s attention in particular.

When asked if there were “any unexpected gems you came across” while researching his latest book “The Sense of Style,” Pinker names Mark Turner and Francis Noël Thomas’s Clear and Simple as the Truth. “Their model of ‘classic prose’ — the writer directs the reader’s gaze to something in the world — elegantly captures the differences between vigorous and turgid writing,” explains Pinker in the interview.

Not long after the Times interview (literally one day later) Pinker was published in The Chronicle Review of Higher Education for his explanation of why academics stink at writing. Here, Pinker turns to Turner and Thomas for help framing his argument. “In a brilliant little book called Clear and Simple as the Truth, the literary scholars Francis-Noël Thomas and Mark Turner argue that every style of writing can be understood as a model of the communication scenario that an author simulates in lieu of the real-time give-and-take of a conversation.”

“They distinguish, in particular, romantic, oracular, prophetic, practical, and plain styles, each defined by how the writer imagines himself to be related to the reader, and what the writer is trying to accomplish…Among those styles is one they single out as an aspiration for writers of expository prose. They call it classic style, and they credit its invention to 17th-century French essayists such as Descartes and La Rochefoucauld.”

For the New York Times Sunday Book Review, click here, and to read the rest of Pinker’s article in The Chronicle of Higher Education, click here.