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Nature Photography Day 2015

June 15th, 2015

Today, Monday, June 15, 2015 is the 10th annual Nature Photography Day! Hosted by The North American Nature Photography Association, it is dedicated to encouraging appreciation for nature and raising awareness of the challenges faced by the natural world through the capturing and sharing of pictures.

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Here at PUP, we have numerous titles dedicated to the natural world that are filled to the brim with beautiful pictures and illustrations of nature. Immerse yourself in different landscapes with books like The Arctic Guide, Britain’s Butterflies, and Birds of Botswana.

Finally, be sure to tweet your pictures to us @PrincetonNature. We love seeing them! If you’d like to be part of the conversation, use the hashtag #NaturePhotographyDay.

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World Oceans Day 2015

June 8th, 2015

In December 2008, the United Nations passed a resolution officially recognizing June 8th as World Oceans Day. It is organized and coordinated by The Ocean Project, an organization that focuses its efforts on advancing ocean conservation in partnership with zoos, aquariums, and museums around the world. World Oceans Day aims to raise awareness of the current health of the ocean and educate people on the myriad ways that we rely on this complex ecosystem. To learn more about World Oceans Day and their events, visit the website.

If you’d like to learn more about the world’s oceans, Princeton University Press publishes a number of titles on the subject, including Climate and the Oceans, The Extreme Life of the Sea, and The Great Ocean Conveyor.

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World Environment Day 2015

June 5th, 2015

Today, Friday, June 5 is World Environment Day. Organized by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), the honorary day is hosted by a different country each year. This year the host country is Italy, and the theme is “Seven Billion Dreams. One Planet. Consume with Care.”

So how is World Environment Day different from Earth Day? Earth Day was established in 1970 as part of a movement for greater environmental awareness in the United States, while World Environment Day was established in 1972 by the General Assembly of the United Nations. While Earth Day is a day to raise awareness for the environment as a whole, World Environment Day is thematic. Last year the theme was “Raise Your Voice Not the Sea Level,” with emphasis placed on the health of our oceans. This year UNEP has placed the focus on consuming resources responsibly.

Here at Princeton University Press, we publish a wide range of titles for those that appreciate our beautiful planet. These include A Pocket Guide to Sharks of the World, Birds of Australia, and Offshore Sea Life ID Guide West and East, among many others.

If you would like to follow along with World Environment Day, use the hashtags #WorldEnvironmentDay and #WED15 on Twitter, and don’t forget to tweet pictures to us @PrincetonNature. We’d love to see them!

#MammothMonday: PUP’s pups sound off on How to Clone a Mammoth

May 18th, 2015

The idea of cloning a mammoth, the science of which is explored in evolutionary biologist and “ancient DNA expert” Beth Shapiro’s new book, How to Clone a Mammoth, is the subject of considerable debate. One can only imagine what the animal kingdom would think of such an undertaking, but wonder no more. PUP staffers were feeling “punny” enough to ask their best friends:

 

Chester reads shapiro

Chester can’t get past “ice age bones”.

 

Buddy reads shapiro

Buddy thinks passenger pigeons would be so much more civilized… and fun to chase.

 

Tux reads shapiro

Tux always wanted to be an evolutionary biologist…

 

Stella reads Shapiro

Stella thinks 240 pages on a glorified elephant is a little excessive. Take her for a walk.

 

Murphy reads shapiro

A mammoth weighs how much?! Don’t worry, Murphy. The tundra is a long way from New Jersey.

 

Glad we got that out of our systems. Check out a series of original videos on cloning from How to Clone a Mammoth author Beth Shapiro here.

The Politics of Precaution takes home the prestigious Lynton Keith Caldwell Prize at APSA

September 5th, 2014

Our heartfelt congratulations go out to David Vogel, author of The Politics of Precaution: Regulating Health, Safety, and Environmental Risks in Europe and the United States. The book was named winner of the 2014 Lynton Keith Caldwell Prize given by the Science, Technology, and Environmental Politics Section of the American Political Science Association.

The Lynton Keith Caldwell Prize recognizes the best book on environmental politics and policy published in the past three years. The award was given last week at the annual APSA conference. You can learn more about the award and view a list of previous winners here.


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The Politics of Precaution:
Regulating Health, Safety, and Environmental Risks in Europe and the United States
David Vogel

Celebrate National Honey Bee Day with Noah Wilson-Rich!

July 30th, 2014

Noah Wilson-Rich, Ph.D., author of the upcoming The Bee: A Natural History, will be speaking at the Cape Cod Museum of Natural History for National Honey Bee Day on August 16.

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Wilson-Rich has been keeping bees on Cape Cod since 2010 and maintains two apiaries in Truro, where he conducts research on experimental vaccines that could potentially improve the health of honey bees. His talk at the museum will focus on this research, as well as the role of bees on Cape Cod and the importance of honey bees in sustainable gardening. He will also discuss his business, the Best Bees Company, a service based in Boston’s South End that installs and manages hives for honey bees for businesses and residents of eastern Massachusetts.

 thebeewilson-rich  The Bee: A Natural History by Noah Wilson-Rich

It’s Getting Hot in Here: Eric H. Cline’s New York Times Op-Ed on the Perils of Climate Change

May 28th, 2014

5-28 Bronze Age CollapseIn the eye of the storm – that is to say, in the unrelenting public discussion that is climate change – author Eric H. Cline’s latest Op-Ed for The New York Times packs quite a gale force.

Holding both ancient and contemporary society up to the proverbial light, Cline asks if we’re really all that different from our forebears and whether or not we’re capable of avoiding a similarly abrupt end.

Eric H. Cline, a Professor of classics and anthropology at George Washington University and the Director of the Capitol Archaeological Institute,  doesn’t hesitate to present these very early, and very scary repercussions of environmental catastrophe. He reminds readers that these events have acted as catalysts of warfare and harbingers of destruction since the days of old, or, more specifically, since the tail-end of the Late Bronze Age.

In his new book, 1177 B.C.: The Year Civilization Collapsed, Cline reveals that the thriving cultures within Egypt, Greece, and Mesopotamia didn’t necessarily succumb to the military prowess of the ‘Sea Peoples’ alone, but rather, fell victim to Mother Nature herself: earthquakes, changes in water temperature, drought, and famine hearkened in a period of rebellion, followed by complete ruin.


“We still do not know the specific details of the collapse at the end of the Late Bronze Age or how the cascade of events came to change society so drastically. But it is clear that climate change was one of the primary drivers or stressors, leading to the societal breakdown.”


The real question Cline seems to be getting at is: “Why not us?” We’re no more able to control the weather than they were – or are we? Recent debates about global warming suggest that we might just be able to put off our own demise, at least temporarily.

What happens if we don’t change our habits, however, is less certain; but Cline is fairly convinced, based on the evidence from his book, that it won’t be good. For him, the possibility of total collapse is far from the realm of the ridiculous, and his article is not so much a threat as it is a warning. Maybe if we know what brought our ancestors into the Dark Ages, we can stay in a light for just a little while longer.

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Eric H. Cline is the author of:

5-28 Cline 1177 B.C.: The Year Civilization Collapsed by Eric H. Cline Hardcover | 2014 | $29.95 / £19.95 | ISBN: 9780691140896
264 pp. | 6 x 9 | 10 halftones. 2 maps. | eBook | ISBN: 9781400849987
Reviews Table of Contents Prologue[PDF]

Today is World Water Day

March 22nd, 2013

Each year, World Water Day is held on the 22nd of March as an international means of emphasizing the importance of freshwater and advocating for the sustainable management of Earth’s water resources. According to UN Water, this year’s theme is International Year of Water Cooperation. Celebrations all over the globe are in full swing today. Check out the World Map of Events to get involved!

Want to broaden your understanding of water systems and sustainability? Our Princeton Primers in Climate series are the ideal first place to turn to get the essential facts and to begin further investigation–whether in the classroom or in one’s own reading chair.

k9635The Cryosphere by Shawn J. Marshall

Introduction to the cryosphere and the broader role it plays in our global climate system. Looks at each component of the cryosphere and how it works–seasonal snow, permafrost, river and lake ice, sea ice, glaciers, ice sheets, and ice shelves. Marshall describes how snow and ice interact with our atmosphere and oceans and how they influence climate, sea level, and ocean circulation.

 

RandallAtmosphere, Clouds, and Climate by David Randall

David Randall looks at how the atmosphere regulates radiative energy flows and transports energy through weather systems such as thunderstorms, monsoons, hurricanes, and winter storms. Randall explains how these processes work, and also how precipitation, cloud formation, and other phase changes of water strongly influence weather and climate.

 

Vallis - oceansClimate and the Oceans by Geoffrey K. Vallis

Offers a short, self-contained introduction to the subject. This illustrated primer begins by briefly describing the world’s climate system and ocean circulation and goes on to explain the important ways that the oceans influence climate. Topics covered include the oceans’ effects on the seasons, heat transport between equator and pole, climate variability, and global warming.

 

Celebrate World Water Day! Today, enlighten yourself and inform others about the sustainable management of the world’s water supply.

 

So, what carnivore does Panthera president Luke Hunter think most “needs the spotlight for conservation efforts”?

December 5th, 2011

Hint — it is one of the Wizard of Oz trifecta…

Click through for the answer and to access a wonderful interview with one of the leading Big Cats conservation voices in the world (and coincidentally PUP author), Luke Hunter.

In a revealing interview with The Wildlife Conservation Examiner Cathy Taibbi, Hunter reveals that the African lion is in what he calls a “conservation blind-spot”. Because tours run through heavily populated areas, it gives the impression that lions are thriving and populous in the wild, but Hunter notes that these tours run through protected areas and that the story is quite different in unprotected regions. Lions compete for resources just like any other animal and unfortunately in farming areas, people and their livestock are easy pickings which creates dangerous conditions and threatens the economic viability of the farms themselves.

There are lots of other great tidbits in the interview which is available on the Examiner web site: http://www.examiner.com/wildlife-conservation-in-national/carnivores-of-the-world-interview-with-dr-hunter-author-president-panthera-review

Read along to discover how Luke Hunter was bitten by the big-cats bug when he was a toddler, whether there really is a difference between the puma and the cougar, and whether re-introduced wolf populations really are different from the wolves of an earlier period.

Click on the cat to the right to view a sample page from Carnivores of the World.

Antarctic Wildlife reminds us “why even the most remote places on Earth are worth defending.”

May 23rd, 2011

We publish field guides — lots and lots of field guides–and many of them are for fairly remote places in the world. One side benefit to publishing and reading these books is, as reviewer Brad Sylvester notes in his review of Antarctic Wildlife by James Lowen, they serve both as field guides to aid in identifying critters AND as conservation ambassadors to the world:

“It’s difficult to appreciate far off consequences of things like melting polar ice-caps, rising ocean levels, and other effects that happen far away or too slowly for the eye to see. That’s one reason why I think books like James Lowen’s Antarctic Wildlife, A Visitor’s Guide are so important,” says Sylvester. “They help provide context for and appreciation of the Antarctic as more than an abstract concept.”

Sylvester goes on to say that the Antarctic, “one of the Earth’s most critical and fragile habitats is in a state of flux, impacted by ocean acidification, climate change, ozone depletion and a host of man-made pressures.”

He concludes that books like this remind us “why even the most remote places on Earth are worth defending.”

Read more here at Yahoo! News: http://news.yahoo.com/s/ac/20110520/sc_ac/8508497_lowens_antarctic_wildlife_a_visitors_guide_adds_perspective.

You can also view some sample plates from this book here.