1177 B.C.’s Eric Cline at the 2014 National Book Festival in Washington, D.C.

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When:
August 30, 2014 @ 1:40 pm – 2:25 pm
2014-08-30T13:40:00-04:00
2014-08-30T14:25:00-04:00
Where:
Walter E. Washington Convention Center
801 Mount Vernon Place Northwest
Washington, DC 20001
USA
Cost:
Free
Contact:
(888) 714-4696

Can’t get enough of 1177 B.C.: The Year Civilization Collapsed? Author Eric H. Cline will be among those reading from and signing copies of his book at this year’s National Book Festival in Washington, D.C.

Mr. Cline will be presenting his book on the Science stage of the Walter E. Washington Convention Center from 1:40 pm-2:25 pm and signing copies of the text from 3:00 pm-4:00 pm. There will be discussion aplenty, so come join us!

Eric H. Cline is professor of classics and anthropology and director of the Capitol Archaeological Institute at George Washington University. An active archaeologist, he has excavated and surveyed in Greece, Crete, Cyprus, Egypt, Israel, and Jordan. His many books include From Eden to Exile: Unraveling the Mysteries of the Bible and The Trojan War: A Very Short Introduction. His latest book, 1177 B.C.: The Year Civilization Collapsed, examines the causes of the end of the Late Bronze Age. 

Cline’s book tells the tale of how this end was brought about by multiple interconnected failures, ranging from invasion and revolt to earthquakes, drought, and the cutting of international trade routes. Bringing to life the vibrant multicultural world of these great civilizations, he draws a sweeping panorama of the empires and globalized peoples of the Late Bronze Age and shows that it was their very interdependence that hastened their dramatic collapse and ushered in a dark age that lasted centuries. A compelling combination of narrative and the latest scholarship, 1177 B.C. sheds new light on the complex ties that gave rise to, and ultimately destroyed, the flourishing civilizations of the Late Bronze Age—and that set the stage for the emergence of classical Greece.

Interested in learning a little more about the book? You can check out 1177 B.C.‘s prologue here.

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