Japanese Tales of Lafcadio Hearn: Andrei Codrescu and Sean Cole

Japanese Tales of Lafcadio Hearn is a collection of 28 strange, ghost stories written by Hearn. Hearn was one of the nineteenth century’s best-known writers, his name celebrated alongside those of Mark Twain and Robert Louis Stevenson. He worked as a reporter in Cincinnati, New Orleans, and the West Indies before heading to Japan in 1890 on a commission from Harper’s. There, he married a Japanese woman from a samurai family, changed his name to Koizumi Yakumo, and became a Japanese subject. An avid collector of traditional Japanese tales, legends, and myths, Hearn taught literature and wrote his own tales for both Japanese and Western audiences. His Japanese tales have been most famously turned into the film, Kwaidan (1965), directed by Masaki Kobayashi.

Andrei Codrescu is a poet, novelist, essayist, and NPR commentator. His many books include Whatever Gets You through the NightThe Postmodern Dada Guide, and The Poetry Lesson.

Sean Cole is a producer, reporter and occasional guest host for This American Life. He’s worked in public radio for more than 20 years — also as a producer for Radiolab, a reporter for Marketplace and a contributor for many other programs and podcasts including 99% Invisible, Studio 360, and Only a Game. His poetry collections include The December Projectpublished by Boog Literature, Itty City by Pressed Wafer and One Train on Dusie press.

Rob Reich: Philanthropy, Democracy, and You

Rob Reich is a professor of political science and, by courtesy, professor of philosophy at the Graduate School of Education at Stanford University, where he directs the Center for Ethics in Society, co-directs the Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society, and is associate director of the Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence initiative. Focusing his work on ethics, public policy, and technology, Reich most recently authored Just Giving: Why Philanthropy is Failing Democracy and How It Can Do Better. A former sixth-grade teacher, he has received multiple teaching awards, including the Walter J. Gores Award. Reich serves on the boards of Boston Review magazine and the Spencer Foundation.

Book Launch Party – DIGITAL CASH by Finn Brunton

Please join us for the launch of DIGITAL CASH: The Unknown History of the Anarchists, Utopians, and Technologists Who Created Cryptocurrency. Programming will begin at 6:30p in the Internet Archive’s Great Room, followed by a reception and book signing. Books will be available for sale onsite.

In DIGITAL CASH (publishing June 25, 2019), Finn Brunton reveals how, since the 1920s, technological utopians and political radicals have turned to experimental money as they key to realizing their visions for the future: protecting privacy, bringing down governments, preparing for apocalypse, and launching a civilization of innovation and abundance that would make its creators immortal. This incredible story of the pioneers of cryptocurrency takes us from autonomous zones on the high seas to the world’s most valuable dump, from bank runs to idea coupons, from time travelers in a San Francisco bar to the pattern securing every twenty-dollar bill, and from marketplaces for dangerous secrets to a tank of frozen heads in Scottsdale, Arizona.

Time
Doors Open: 6:00 PM
In Conversation with Finn Brunton: 6:30 – 7:45 PM
Reception: 7:45 – 9:00 PM

Light refreshments will be served. Finn Brunton’s book will also be available for purchase and signing during the reception.

About the Author

Finn Brunton (finnb.net) is the author of Spam: A Shadow History of the Internet (2013) and Digital Cash: The Unknown History of the Anarchists, Technologists, and Utopians Who Created Cryptocurrency (2019), and the co-author of Obfuscation: A User’s Guide for Privacy and Protest (2015) and Communication (2019). He teaches in Media, Culture, and Communication at New York University.

 

The Internet Archive is located within 1-2 blocks of the following MUNI lines: 1 California, 2 Clement, 28 19th Ave and 38 Geary. There is also a paid parking lot at the Ross Dress-for-Less on Geary @ 16th ave.

Street parking in the neighborhood surrounding the Archive is free after 6pm. Please allow some additional time to find parking.

Socialist Roots and Writings: Michael Rosen in Conversation

The prolific and hilarious writer Michael Rosen brings his own childhood to light in his new memoir, So They Call You Pisher! As a child, he dreamt of a socialist revolution—until his parents decided to leave the party in 1957. In this event, Rosen discusses his career as a political campaigner and an acclaimed children’s poet, and how he fused the two in his collections of socialist fairy tales, Workers’ Tales: Socialist Fairy Tales, Fables, and Allegories from Great Britain, and Reading and Rebellion: An Anthology of Radical Writing for Children.

Join us for an evening of laughter, language, and politics with one of the today’s most charismatic living storytellers.

 

Michael Rosen

Michael Rosen is a Professor of Children’s Literature at Goldsmiths, University of London, where he co-devised and teaches an MA and was Children’s Laureate from 2007-2009. He is one of Britain’s best-loved writers and performance poets for children and adults and has also published over 200 books.

Carl Frey: The Technology trap: Capital, labour and power in the age of automation

Book launch for ‘The Technology Trap’ by Carl Frey, with response from Diane Coyle

Monday 24 June, 6-7.15pm, Resolution Foundation offices, Westminster

 

In the long run, rising living standards are driven by productivity improvements. But people don’t live in the long run. While technological innovations can boost output and living standards, they can also disrupt labour markets and shift power balances both between new and established firms, and between capital and labour.

In a critically-acclaimed new book, economist Carl Frey examines the impact of technological change on the world of work and the wider economy over the last 800 years, and then considers what the age of automation might mean for the future of work.

The Resolution Foundation is hosting an event at its Westminster headquarters to launch the book. We will hear from author Carl Frey on the key insights from the book, before a response from Diane Coyle, one of the UK’s leading economists. Both will then take part in an audience Q&A, chaired by RF Chief Executive Torsten Bell.

 

Speakers

Carl Frey, co-director of the Oxford Martin Programme on Technology and Employment, University of Oxford

Diane Coyle, Bennett Professor of Public Policy, University of Cambridge

Torsten Bell, Chief Executive of the Resolution Foundation (Chair)

John Quiggin – Economics in Two Lessons, in conversation with Peter Martin

A masterful introduction to the key ideas behind the successes and failures of free-market economics.
Since 1946, Henry Hazlitt’s bestselling Economics in One Lesson has popularized the belief that economics can be boiled down to one simple lesson: market prices represent the true cost of everything. But one-lesson economics tells only half the story. It can explain why markets often work so well, but it can’t explain why they often fail so badly—or what we should do when they stumble. As Nobel Prize-winning economist Paul Samuelson quipped, “When someone preaches ‘Economics in one lesson,’ I advise: Go back for the second lesson.” In Economics in Two Lessons, John Quiggin teaches both lessons, offering a masterful introduction to the key ideas behind the successes—and failures—of free markets.

Economics in Two Lessons explains why market prices often fail to reflect the full cost of our choices to society as a whole. For example, every time we drive a car, fly in a plane, or flick a light switch, we contribute to global warming. But, in the absence of a price on carbon emissions, the costs of our actions are borne by everyone else. In such cases, government action is needed to achieve better outcomes.

Two-lesson economics means giving up the dogmatism of laissez-faire as well as the reflexive assumption that any economic problem can be solved by government action, since the right answer often involves a mixture of market forces and government policy. But the payoff is huge: understanding how markets actually work’and what to do when they don’t.

Brilliantly accessible, Economics in Two Lessons unlocks the essential issues at the heart of any economic question.

John Quiggin – Economics in Two Lessons

John Quiggin – Economics in Two Lessons

Tuesday 25 June 2019
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM
In store at Avid Reader Bookshop
Ticket $10.00, Book (Economics in Two Lessons : Why Markets Work So Well and Why They Can Fail So Badly) $29.99
Tickets available until 25 June 2019 6:00 PM

This event commences at 6.30pm. Printed tickets are not issued and your booking will be on a door list under your surname.

A masterful introduction to the key ideas behind the successes – and failures – of free-market economics.

ABC Radio National’s Paul Barclay is in-conversation with John Quiggin discussing Economics in Two Lessons: Why Markets Work So Well and Why They Can Fail So Badly.

Since 1946, Henry Hazlitt’s bestselling Economics in One Lesson has popularized the belief that economics can be boiled down to one simple lesson: market prices represent the true cost of everything. But one-lesson economics tells only half the story. It can explain why markets often work so well, but it can’t explain why they often fail so badly—or what we should do when they stumble. As Nobel Prize–winning economist Paul Samuelson quipped, “When someone preaches ‘Economics in one lesson,’ I advise: Go back for the second lesson.” In Economics in Two Lessons, John Quiggin teaches both lessons, offering a masterful introduction to the key ideas behind the successes—and failures—of free markets.

Economics in Two Lessons explains why market prices often fail to reflect the full cost of our choices to society as a whole. For example, every time we drive a car, fly in a plane, or flick a light switch, we contribute to global warming. But, in the absence of a price on carbon emissions, the costs of our actions are borne by everyone else. In such cases, government action is needed to achieve better outcomes.

Two-lesson economics means giving up the dogmatism of laissez-faire as well as the reflexive assumption that any economic problem can be solved by government action, since the right answer often involves a mixture of market forces and government policy. But the payoff is huge: understanding how markets actually work—and what to do when they don’t.

Brilliantly accessible, Economics in Two Lessons unlocks the essential issues at the heart of any economic question.

John Quiggin is the President’s Senior Fellow in Economics at the University of Queensland. His previous book, Zombie Economics: How Dead Ideas Still Walk Among Us, has been translated into eight languages. He has written for the New York Times and the Economist, among other publications, and is a frequent blogger for Crooked Timber and on his own website: www.johnquiggin.com. Twitter @JohnQuiggin

An Evening with Tom Seeley

Join the Urban Toronto Beekeepers’ and the Toronto District Beekeepers’ Associations for an evening with Professor Tom Seeley from Cornell University in New York.

Author of numerous books on bees including Honeybee DemocracyThe Wisdom of the Hive, and the just-released Lives of Bees, the Untold Story of the Honey Bee in the Wild, Seeley will talk about how he tracks wild bees to their hives in the Arnot Forest so he can study and learn from them, and how we might be able to follow wild bees ourselves. Copies of his books will be available for sale.

Designed to whet your appetite for all things bees, ahead of an all-day Saturday meeting on June 22nd at the lovely Humber Arboretum, this evening will inspire you to come out and celebrate these wonderful creatures!

Sharon Marcus in conversation with Jonathan Grossman

DRAMA OF CELEBRITY
BY SHARON MARCUS
in conversation with  JONATHAN GROSSMAN

Why do so many people care so much about celebrities? What are the privileges and pleasures of fandom? Do celebrities ever deserve the outsized attention they receive?

In this fascinating and deeply researched book, Sharon Marcus challenges everything you thought you knew about our obsession with fame. Icons are not merely famous for being famous; the media alone cannot make or break stars; fans are not simply passive dupes. Instead, journalists, the public, and celebrities themselves all compete, passionately and expertly, to shape the stories we tell about celebrities and fans. The result: a high-stakes drama as endless as it is unpredictable.

Drawing on scrapbooks, personal diaries, and vintage fan mail, Marcus traces celebrity culture back to its nineteenth-century roots, when people the world over found themselves captivated by celebrity chefs, bad-boy poets, and actors such as the “divine” Sarah Bernhardt (1844–1923), as famous in her day as the Beatles in theirs. Known in her youth for sleeping in a coffin, hailed in maturity as a woman of genius, Bernhardt became a global superstar thanks to savvy engagement with her era’s most innovative media and technologies: the popular press, commercial photography, and speedy new forms of travel.

Sharon Marcus is a founding editor of Public Books and the Orlando Harriman Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University. She is the author of the award-winning Between Women: Friendship, Desire, and Marriage in Victorian England (Princeton) and Apartment Stories: City and Home in Nineteenth-Century Paris and London.

Jonathan Grossman is at work on a book about the history and theory of standardization. His last book, Charles Dickens’s Networks: Public Transport and the Novel, analyzed the rise of public transport, the standardization of time and space, and the novel. A long term interest in the relation of community to systems and networks lies behind both projects. Grossman received the UCLA Senate Distinguished Teaching Award in 2014.

James O’Donnell: The War for Gaul

A new translation that captures the gripping power of one of the greatest war stories ever told–Julius Caesar’s pitiless account of his brutal campaign to conquer Gaul

Imagine a book about an unnecessary war written by the ruthless general of an occupying army–a vivid and dramatic propaganda piece that forces the reader to identify with the conquerors and that is designed, like the war itself, to fuel the limitless political ambitions of the author. Could such a campaign autobiography ever be a great work of literature–perhaps even one of the greatest? It would be easy to think not, but such a book exists–and it helped transform Julius Caesar from a politician on the make into the Caesar of legend. This remarkable new translation of Caesar’s famous but underappreciatedWar for Gaulcaptures, like never before in English, the gripping and powerfully concise style of the future emperor’s dispatches from the front lines in what are today France, Belgium, Germany, and Switzerland.

While letting Caesar tell his battle stories in his own way, distinguished classicist James O’Donnell also fills in the rest of the story in a substantial introduction and notes that together explain whyGaulis the “best bad man’s book ever written”–a great book in which a genuinely bad person offers a bald-faced, amoral description of just how bad he has been.

Complete with a chronology, a map of Gaul, suggestions for further reading, and an index, this feature-rich edition captures the forceful austerity of a troubling yet magnificent classic–a book that, as O’Donnell says, “gets war exactly right and morals exactly wrong.”

David G. Blanchflower: Not Working: Where Have All the Good Jobs Gone?

David G. Blanchflower, professor at Dartmouth College, will present his noteworthy new book, Not Working: Where Have All the Good Jobs Gone?, at a launch event at the Peterson Institute for International Economics (PIIE) on June 14, 2019.

Not Working is about those who cannot find full-time work at a decent wage—the underemployed—and how their plight is contributing to widespread despair, a worsening drug epidemic, and the unchecked rise of right-wing populism. Blanchflower draws on his acclaimed work in the economics of labor and well-being to explain why today’s post-recession economy is vastly different from what came before. The book is a candid report on how the young and the less skilled are among the worst casualties of underemployment, how immigrants are taking the blame, and how the epidemic of unhappiness and self-destructive behavior will continue to spread unless we deal with it.

David G. Blanchflower has been the Bruce V. Rauner Professor of Economics at Dartmouth College since 2001. He is also professor of economics at the University of Stirling, and a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. He was member of the Monetary Policy Committee of the Bank of England, from June 2006 to June 2009. He was made a Commander of the British Empire (CBE) in the Queen’s Birthday Honours List in June 2009 for services to the Monetary Policy Committee and economics.

Book Launch & Discussion: Ottoman Baroque: The Architectural Refashioning of Eighteenth-Century Istanbul

On Friday June 28th The Royal Asiatic Society will host a joint book launch of Ünver Rüstem’s Ottoman Baroque: The Architectural Refashioning of Eighteenth-Century Istanbul and Chanchal B. Dadlani’s From Stone to Paper: Architecture as History in the Late Mughal Empire. Chairing the discussion will be Dr. Sussan Babaie (Andrew W. Mellon Reader in the Arts of Iran and Islam, The Courtauld Institute of Art).

With its idiosyncratic yet unmistakable adaptation of European Baroque models, the eighteenth-century architecture of Istanbul has frequently been dismissed by modern observers as inauthentic and derivative, a view reflecting broader unease with notions of Western influence on Islamic cultures. In Ottoman Baroque—the first English-language book on the topic—Ünver Rüstem provides a compelling reassessment of this building style and shows how between 1740 and 1800 the Ottomans consciously coopted European forms to craft a new, politically charged, and globally resonant image for their empire’s capital.

 

Rüstem reclaims the label “Ottoman Baroque” as a productive framework for exploring the connectedness of Istanbul’s eighteenth-century buildings to other traditions of the period. Using a wealth of primary sources, he demonstrates that this architecture was in its own day lauded by Ottomans and foreigners alike for its fresh, cosmopolitan effect. Purposefully and creatively assimilated, the style’s cross-cultural borrowings were combined with Byzantine references that asserted the Ottomans’ entitlement to the Classical artistic heritage of Europe. Such aesthetic rebranding was part of a larger endeavor to reaffirm the empire’s power at a time of intensified East-West contact, taking its boldest shape in a series of imperial mosques built across the city as landmarks of a state-sponsored idiom.

 

Copiously illustrated and drawing on previously unpublished documents, Ottoman Baroquebreaks new ground in our understanding of Islamic visual culture in the modern era and offers a persuasive counterpoint to Eurocentric accounts of global art history.

 

Reviews

Ottoman Baroque takes a reflective and fine-grained look at a major stylistic turn in Ottoman architecture that has previously been dismissed and misunderstood in modern scholarship. Ünver Rüstem boldly reclaims the topic with an alternative and highly original critical perspective.”—Ahmet Ersoy, Boğaziçi University

“Ünver Rüstem’s book offers a highly original mapping of local and foreign perceptions of the Ottoman Baroque’s aesthetic syncretism. By attending to the changing architectural ambitions of imperial mosque construction in the Ottoman capital, Istanbul, Rüstem’s study deftly navigates this period of robust artistic dialogue and cross-cultural transfer. Historiographically attuned, visually compelling, and thoughtfully written, this is a must-read for anyone engaged with the global Baroque.”—Mary Roberts, The University of Sydney

 

Bio

Ünver Rüstem is Assistant Professor of Islamic Art and Architecture at Johns Hopkins University. His research centers on the Ottoman Empire in its later centuries and on questions of cross-cultural exchange and interaction. He received his PhD from Harvard University and has held fellowships at Columbia University, the University of Cambridge, and Harvard University. In addition to his new book, he has published articles and chapters on subjects ranging from the reception of illustrated Islamic manuscripts to the symbolic deployment of ceremonial in the context of Ottoman architecture. At present, he is working on a new book project that explores the role of costume in Ottoman interactions with Western Europe during the early modern and modern periods.