Looking back — a #TBT for #UPWeek

Upress week

 

This afternoon, we head back in time for University Press Week’s Throwback Thursday. Check out these six posts for a look back at the history, recent and not so recent, of university presses.

Temple University Press — The folks at Temple University discuss the development of their influential Asian History and Culture series.

Wesleyan University Press — Learn more about the great Wesleyan Poetry Series with this group of #tbt posts.

Harvard University Press — Late last year, Harvard University Press made roughly 3,000 previously unavailable backlist works available again. These titles go back as far as the late 1800s. (How cool!) While prepping the data, we kept a running list of titles that were really showing their age. This post will give you a few laughs as you are asked to name “Backlist Title from Harvard University Press - OR – Song by Theatrically Erudite Indie Band The Decemberists?”

University of Washington Press — Check out the “then and now” cover designs of these recently reissued Asian American classics.

University of Toronto Press — University of Toronto Press will be looking back at the publications of The Champlain Society, an historical society which publishes primary source archive material that explores Canada’s history. Their post highlights this year’s volume, as well as historical images from past publications.

MIT Press — Up at MIT, they take a look back at former press designer Muriel Cooper. She designed MIT Press’s iconic colophon 50 years ago in 1964.

Tim Chartier and the Mega Menger

math bytesHow many business cards are needed to complete a level 3 Menger Sponge? What is a level 3 Menger Sponge? Tim Chartier, author of Math Bytes: Google Bombs, Chocolate Covered Pi, and Other Cool Bits in Computing, explains.

In a Huffington Post article, A Million Business Cards Presents a Math Challenge, Chartier asks readers to go in their wallet and check for  business cards. If there aren’t any, “they may be part of a worldwide math challenge. Over the past month, people around the world have been building a mathematical structure out of more than a million business cards.” That mathematical structure is a Mega Menger, but before we get there, let’s discuss what a level 1 Menger Sponge is.

A level 1 Menger Sponge is a fractal consisting of twenty cubes. Each cube is made up of 6 business cards, so a level 1 Menger needs 120 business cards. A level 2 Menger is created using 20 level 1 Mengers, a level 3 Menger is made with 20 level 2 Mengers, so on and so on.

Here at the Press, we don’t have a million business cards to complete a Mega Menger, but we do have a lot of books. Using Chartier’s code (which you can play with here: http://lifeislinear.davidson.edu/sierpinski.html), we were able to create 2-D versions of a Menger Sponge called a Sierpinski Carpet using our jacket images. Below, see if you can figure out which books are featured in the fractal images below! Click the images to see the related title.

1.
zombies

2.
penguins

3.
amazons

4.
weeden

5.
copy

#UPWeek: Press Director Peter Dougherty participating in Collaboration in Scholarly Publishing today at 1 PM EST

Join the Association of American University Presses today, November 12, 2014, from 1pm-2pm ET, in celebrating scholarly presses by highlighting three exemplary collaborative projects in an online panel moderated by Jennifer Howard from The Chronicle of Higher Education.

The session will be presented on Google+: http://bit.ly/ZUCKr1

Ms. Howard will be joined by Barbara Kline Pope, Executive Director for Communications at National Academies Press and AAUP President, Peter Dougherty, Director of Princeton University Press, and Ron Chrisman, Director of the University of North Texas Press to discuss the projects they spearheaded for their respective presses. These three projects illustrate some of the best work being produced in publishing today and open the door to talk about other collaborations within science and the humanities.

  • Princeton University Press and Caltech’s Einstein Papers Project provides the first complete picture of Albert Einstein’s massive written legacy.
  • National Academies Press’s Academy Scope is a visualization of all of the reports that are available on NAP.edu, allowing readers to browse through the reports of the National Academies by topic area and seeing relationships between titles.
  • University of North Texas Press, University of North Texas Sub-Antarctic Biocultural Conservation Program, and University of Magallanes in Chile’s Magellanic Sub-Antarctic Ornithology project is the result of a decade of research conducted by scientists associated with the Omora Ethnobotanical Park in the Cape Horn Biosphere Reserve in Chile.

 

November 12, 2014, 1pm-2pm ET

Collaboration in Scholarly Publishing

Presented on Google+

http://bit.ly/ZUCKr1

#UPWeek

#UPWeek Princeton at the movies

BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH stars in THE IMITATION GAME Photo: Jack English © 2014 The Weinstein Company. All rights reserved.

BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH stars in THE IMITATION GAME
Photo: Jack English © 2014 The Weinstein Company. All rights reserved.

Lights, camera, action!

Much as A Beautiful Mind introduced millions of readers to the singular genius of John Nash as portrayed by Russell Crowe in an Oscar-winning performance, The Imitation Game—starring Benedict Cumberbatch, Keira Knightley,Matthew Goode, Allen Leech, Charles Dance, among others, and arriving in theaters November 28—casts a spotlight on the accomplishments and contributions of Enigma code-breaker Alan Turing (1912–1954).

The movie draws inspiration from Andrew Hodges’s award-winning biography Alan Turing: The Enigma, which was originally published in 1983. Princeton University Press has released an updated, paperback movie edition complete with new material from the author that brings the story of Turing’s life current through the 2013 royal pardon of his conviction for homosexual activity. Movie-goers will no doubt be eager to learn more about Turing, an unlikely hero credited with turning the tide of World War II by cracking the German Enigma code, and Alan Turing: The Enigma offers the most authoritative and readable account of his life and work.

In celebration of #UPWeek, Princeton University Press sat down with mathematics editor, Vickie Kearn, to go behind the scenes of making a celebrated book into a major motion picture.

The Book

Alan Turing: The Enigma: The Book That Inspired the Film The Imitation Game
By Andrew Hodges

It is only a slight exaggeration to say that the British mathematician Alan Turing (1912-1954) saved the Allies from the Nazis, invented the computer and artificial intelligence, and anticipated gay liberation by decades–all before his suicide at age forty-one. This acclaimed biography of the founder of computer science, with a new preface by the author that addresses Turing’s royal pardon in 2013, is the definitive account of an extraordinary mind and life.

Capturing both the inner and outer drama of Turing’s life, Andrew Hodges tells how Turing’s revolutionary idea of 1936–the concept of a universal machine–laid the foundation for the modern computer and how Turing brought the idea to practical realization in 1945 with his electronic design. The book also tells how this work was directly related to Turing’s leading role in breaking the German Enigma ciphers during World War II, a scientific triumph that was critical to Allied victory in the Atlantic. At the same time, this is the tragic account of a man who, despite his wartime service, was eventually arrested, stripped of his security clearance, and forced to undergo a humiliating treatment program–all for trying to live honestly in a society that defined homosexuality as a crime.

Alan Turing: The Enigma is a gripping story of mathematics, computers, cryptography, and homosexual persecution.

Movie tie-in cover for Alan Turing: The Enigma

Movie tie-in cover for Alan Turing: The Enigma

Q&A with Mathematics Editor, Vickie Kearn

PUP: Tell us about when you first heard that a film based on Alan Turing: The Enigma would be produced. Were you excited? Nervous?

VK: This is a rather interesting story. In the fall of 2011, while planning for the  Princeton University 2012 Turing Centennial Celebration, Bob Sedgewick, a professor at Princeton, contacted me about publishing a book on Alan Turing’s work, including his thesis which he wrote for his PhD at Princeton University. During this time he mentioned that there was a fantastic biography of Alan Turing written by Andrew Hodges and that the book was out of print in the US and had been for some time.

I contacted Andrew and found that I already knew his agent so I contacted him to make sure the US rights for the book were still available. The agent told me that they were and that plans were underway for a revival of the play Breaking the Code by Hugh Whitmore, which was based on the Hodges book. He also told me that a centennial edition of the book was planned by Vintage, who holds the UK rights. This all sounded very exciting, and with the forthcoming centennial events, the timing was perfect.

Just one month later the agent told me that the movie rights had been picked up by Warner Brothers and that the details of the casting, director, etc. should be known by late January of 2012. Princeton University Press worked jointly with Vintage to have the centenary edition of Alan Turing: The Enigma published in time for the centennial Turing events in May 2012, and I had little time to think too much about the movie. Time passed and the movie deal fell apart.

In the late summer of 2013, we learned that a new movie deal was struck and that Benedict Cumberbatch would be the lead actor. This was fantastic news, but I stayed rather calm because I knew by now that these things do fall apart. However, in late September I found out that Black Bear Pictures was the studio and that the movie was in pre-production. In April, we moved into high gear and began serious work on what would be in the movie edition of the book.

PUP: You worked directly with The Imitation Game’s film company and author Andrew Hodges during the making of the movie. What was your role, as editor of Alan Turing: The Enigma?

VK: I have worked with Andrew since 2011 and was very excited that we would be working on a new edition of his book and that we also would be collaborating again with Vintage in the UK. Because we decided to reset the book to improve the legibility, he had to proofread it again. That is a huge effort for a 750 page book. Everyone at the Weinstein Company has been fantastic. They respond quickly and have supported the publication of the book as much as we have supported the film. It has been a very exciting process.  As editor, it is my job to make certain that all the pieces come together at the right time. In publishing, there are many steps to make sure your book is a success. They include the review, editing, design, printing, and binding phases and then we begin the marketing, publicity, and sales events. Everything has to happen at a particular time to make the best use of the efforts of everyone at the press. We need a book cover for ads and that has to be approved by the movie company. I have learned that is a very complicated process. Each of the movie companies decides what will be on the cover. For example, the cover of our book and that for the Vintage edition are different.

Alan Turing plaque on Castro Street in San Francisco

Alan Turing plaque on Castro Street in San Francisco

PUP: What was your favorite part about that interaction?

VK: The PUP publicist of the book, Jessica Pellien, and I have worked so far with about a dozen different people at Vintage and the Weinstein Company. You might think this is a bit chaotic, but it isn’t. It does take a bit of choreography, but it is working well. I think that my favorite part about this whole process is seeing the work of dozens of people come together and then holding the first copy of the book in my hand.

PUP: What do you, as the editor of Andrew Hodges’ book, hope that viewers take away from the film?

VK: I hope that they will realize what a huge contribution Alan Turing made to ending WWII and to the development of computer science. I hope that when someone says, “Can you name a computer scientist?” that they will say Alan Turing as quickly as they might say Albert Einstein when asked to name a physicist. I hope that people will understand that human relationships and love between people does not have to be heterosexual. I hope that people who see the film will also read the book.

PUP: When it comes to movies based on books, do you like to read the book before or after you see the movie?

VK: I always prefer to read the book first. I hope that people who see the film will also read the book. They are two different experiences and both are incredibly enjoyable.

Watch the trailer for the The Imitation Game below. Get that edge over fellow movie-goers and check out Chapter One of Alan Turing: The Enigma here.

 

For more examples of university presses in pop culture, take a look at the posts below:

University of Wisconsin Press

University Press of Mississippi

Georgetown University Press

University Press of Kentucky

Penn Press

 

Enter to win a copy of Alan Turing: The Enigma, the Book That Inspired the Film The Imitation Game

Hodges_AlanTuring movie tie inOn November 28, The Imitation Game will open in limited release. In the film, Benedict Cumberbatch stars as Alan Turing, the genius British mathematician, logician, cryptologist and computer scientist who led the charge to crack the German Enigma Code that helped the Allies win WWII. Turing went on to assist with the development of computers at the University of Manchester after the war, but was prosecuted by the UK government in 1952 for homosexual acts which the country deemed illegal. The film is inspired by the award-winning biography Alan Turing: The Enigma by Andrew Hodges.

To celebrate the release of the film, Princeton University Press is pleased to announce the publication of a new edition of the book with a movie still cover and new material from the author that brings the story current through Turing’s pardon by the Queen. Enter our giveaway below to win a copy of the new edition of the book AND a $25.00 Fandango gift certificate.

This giveaway will run from November 11 through November 24 and is open to residents of the U.S. and Canada, aged 18 and older. No purchase is necessary. If you prefer to enter via email, please send a note to blog@press.princeton.edu. Please see complete terms and conditions below.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

University Press Week is next week! #UPWeek

Monday is the start of University Press Week! Join us as we highlight the extraordinary work of nonprofit scholarly publishers and their many contributions to culture, the academy, and an informed society.

What is #UPWeek you ask?

In the summer of 1978, President Jimmy Carter proclaimed a University Press Week “in recognition of the impact, both here and abroad, of American university presses on culture and scholarship.” That influence continues today, as does the increasing vitality of university press publishing programs, the many ways and means by which works are now produced and distributed, and the urgent need for articulate discourse in times pervaded by sound bites. Pretty cool, huh?

This year, we have a lot to celebrate.

All week long, 31 different university presses will be bringing you the latest and greatest news, including what’s trending in their offices, on their shelves, and in their plans for the future. Every day, tune in here for a new roundup of posts from university presses. We’ll visit MIT on out to the University of Washington, with many stops in between. This year’s topics include:

upress week topics

We begin the week with a look at what’s new in press collaboration, and then we’ll give you an inside look at our presses. Can you spot university presses in pop culture? Just you wait — on Wednesday, we’ll provide the latest scoop. Then on Thursday, we take a look back at some terrific projects that have put university presses on the map. On Friday, we’ll recommend some topics and authors for you to follow — in addition to a discussion of social media.

Gearing Up

So what can you do to prep for a week of enlightening posts and great conversations? Check out this map of university presses to find which is closest to you. When it comes to university presses, you’re among friends — lots of them. The AAUP has over 130 members, all sharing a common commitment to scholarship, the academy, and society.

See you back here on Monday!

Upress week

common commitments to scholarship, the academy, and society – See more at: http://www.aaupnet.org/#sthash.ZdvOvvjy.dpuf
common commitments to scholarship, the academy, and society – See more at: http://www.aaupnet.org/#sthash.ZdvOvvjy.dpuf
common commitments to scholarship, the academy, and society – See more at: http://www.aaupnet.org/#sthash.ZdvOvvjy.dpuf

Using the filter feature on The Warbler Guide App

Scott Whittle and Tom Stephenson revolutionized how birders study, find, hear, and see warblers with their acclaimed book The Warbler Guide. Now they have their sights set on bringing all the breakthrough features from the book, plus a host of app-only features, to your iPhone® and iPad® in the Warbler Guide App.

In this video, Scott introduces the app’s innovative filter function that allows users to narrow their search results by color, facial marks, wing bands, and song. Intuitive, visual, and interactive, this system allows users to find the bird they are seeing in the field quickly and easily.

The Warbler Guide App will be available in December 2014.


bookjacket Warbler Guide App
Tom Stephenson & Scott Whittle
APP | Spring 2015 | $12.99 | ISBN: 9781400849901

Princeton University Press announces selections for The Best Writing on Mathematics: 2014

The output of math writing has steadily increased in volume and quality with major articles appearing in math journals like Notices of the American Mathematical Society, Communications of the ACM, and Math Horizons; general-interest publications like Slate, American Scientist and Foreign Affairs; and still more in disciplinary journals like Physics Today, The American Statistician or Chance. Editor Mircea Pitici reads them all and selects the best of the best for this annual series. The Best Writing on Mathematics is an expertly curated annual celebration of important math writing (or speaking, as you will see below).

Among the many highlights of the 2014 edition are Kenneth Cukier and Viktor Mayer-Schönberger explaining “The Rise of Big Data” and its impact on the world; Sarah-Marie Belcastro describing her “Adventures in Mathematical Knitting;” Tanya Khovanova solving “Conway’s Wizards;” Jordan Ellenberg on a recent breakthrough in the study of prime numbers; Brian Hayes on “Crinkly Curves;” and Keith Devlin describing what makes a video game good for learning mathematics and showing why many games fall short of that goal. John Conway presents examples of arithmetical statements that are almost certainly true but likely unprovable; Carlo Séquin explores, compares, and illustrates distinct types of one-sided surfaces known as Klein bottles; and Stephen Pollard argues that mathematical practice, thinking, and experience transcend the utilitarian value of mathematics. Also included here, for the first time in print, is the text of a talk given by Francis Edward Su on the occasion of receiving the 2013 Haimo Award for Distinguished Teaching.

We hope you will join us in celebrating these excellent articles and speeches from the previous year!

Complete list of selections for

The Best Writing on Mathematics: 2014

(presented in the order of the Table of Contents)

Mathematics and the Good Life, Stephen Pollard (originally appearing in Philosophia Mathematica)

The Rise of Big Data: How It’s Changing the Way We Think about the World, Kenneth Cukier and Viktor Mayer-Schönberger (originally appearing in Foreign Affairs)

Conway’s Wizards, Tanya Khovanova (originally appearing on The Mathematical Intelligencer)

On Unsettleable Arithmetical Problems, John H. Conway (originally appearing in The American Mathematical Monthly)

Crinkly Curves, Brian Hayes (originally appearing in American Scientist)

Why Do We Perceive Logarithmically? Lav R. Varshney and John Z. Sun (originally appearing in Significance)

The Music of Math Games, Keith Devlin (originally appearing in American Scientist)

The Fundamental Theorem of Algebra for Artists, Bahman Kalantari and Bruce Torrence (originally appearing in Math Horizons)

The Arts–Digitized, Quantified, and Analyzed, Nicole Lazar (originally appearing in Chance)

On the Number of Klein Bottle Types, Carlo H. Séquin (originally appearing in Journal of Mathematics and the Arts)

Adventures in Mathematical Knitting, Sarah-Marie Belcastro (originally appearing in American Scientist)

The Mathematics of Fountain Design: A Multiple-Centers Activity, Marshall Gordon (originally appearing in Teaching Mathematics and Its Applications)

Food for (Mathematical) Thought, Penelope Dunham (originally appearing in PRIMUS)

Wondering about Wonder in Mathematics, Dov Zazkis and Rina Zazkis (originally appearing in Wonder-full)

The Lesson of Grace in Teaching, Francis Edward Su (originally appearing on Mathematical Yawp)

Generic Proving: Reflections on Scope and Method, Uri Leron and Orit Zaslavsky (originally appearing in For the Learning of Mathematics)

Extreme Proofs I: The Irrationality of 2, John H. Conway and Joseph Shipman (originally appearing in Mathematical Intelligencer)

Stuck in the Middle: Cauchy’s Intermediate Value Theorem and the History of Analytic Rigor, Michael J. Barany (originally appearing in Notices of the AMS)

Plato, Poincaré, and the Enchanted Dodecahedron: Is the Universe Shaped Like the Poincaré Homology Sphere? Lawrence Brenton (originally appearing in Math Horizons)

Computing with Real Numbers, from Archimedes to Turing and Beyond, Mark Braverman (originally appearing in Communications of the ACM)

Chaos at Fifty, Adilson E. Motter and David K. Campbell (originally appearing in Physics Today)

Twenty-Five Analogies for Explaining Statistical Concepts, Roberto Behar, Pere Grima, and Lluís Marco-Almagro (originally appearing in The American Statistician)

College Admissions and the Stability of Marriage, David Gale and Lloyd S. Shapley (originally appearing in The American Mathematical Monthly)

The Beauty of Bounded Gaps, Jordan Ellenberg (originally appearing on Slate)

We welcome suggestions, comments, and materials for consideration for future volumes. To provide feedback, please contact editor Mircea Pitici.


bookjacket

The Best Writing on Mathematics 2014
Edited by Mircea Pitici

#NewBooks from Princeton University Press

Books released during the week of October 27, 2014
Alan Turing: The Enigma: The Book That Inspired the Film <i>The Imitation Game</i><br>Andrew Hodges<br>With a foreword by Douglas Hofstadter and a new preface by the author Alan Turing: The Enigma:
The Book That Inspired the Film The Imitation Game
Andrew Hodges
With a foreword by Douglas Hofstadter and a new preface by the author


“One of the finest scientific biographies ever written.”–Jim Holt, New Yorker
Alan Turing's Systems of Logic: The Princeton Thesis<br>Edited and introduced by Andrew W. Appel Alan Turing’s Systems of Logic:
The Princeton Thesis
Edited and introduced by Andrew W. Appel


“This book presents the story of Turing’s work at Princeton University and includes a facsimile of his doctoral dissertation, ‘Systems of Logic Based on Ordinals,’ which he completed in 1936. The author includes a detailed history of Turing’s work in computer science and the attempts to ground the field in formal logic.”–Mathematics Teacher
One Hundred Semesters: My Adventures as Student, Professor, and University President, and What I Learned along the Way<br>William M. Chace One Hundred Semesters:
My Adventures as Student, Professor, and University President, and What I Learned along the Way
William M. Chace


“Chace here recounts a young man’s maturation and offers insight into the challenges of university administration. . . . Chace is a gifted storyteller, appealingly honest in analyzing what he did well and where he went wrong.”–Evelyn Beck, Library Journal
Birds of Australia: A Photographic Guide<br>Iain Campbell, Sam Woods & Nick Leseberg<br>With photography by Geoff Jones Birds of Australia:
A Photographic Guide
Iain Campbell, Sam Woods & Nick Leseberg
With photography by Geoff Jones


Birds of Australia is an excellent book. The text is comprehensive, the content is effectively organized and researched, and the scholarship is sound. The photographic plates are of a very high quality.”–Peter S. Lansley, senior ecologist, Brett Lane & Associates
The History of American Higher Education: Learning and Culture from the Founding to World War II<br>Roger L. Geiger The History of American Higher Education:
Learning and Culture from the Founding to World War II
Roger L. Geiger


“An encyclopedic history of American colleges and universities. . . . A well-researched, detailed tome.”–Kirkus Reviews

Win a copy of Alan Turing: The Enigma, The Book That Inspired the Film The Imitation Game and tickets to see the movie

Hodges_AlanTuring movie tie inOn November 21, The Imitation Game will open in limited release. In the film, Benedict Cumberbatch stars as Alan Turing, the genius British mathematician, logician, cryptologist and computer scientist who led the charge to crack the German Enigma Code that helped the Allies win WWII. Turing went on to assist with the development of computers at the University of Manchester after the war, but was prosecuted by the UK government in 1952 for homosexual acts which the country deemed illegal. The film is inspired by the award-winning biography Alan Turing: The Enigma by Andrew Hodges.

To celebrate the release of the film, Princeton University Press is pleased to announce the publication of a new edition of the book with a movie still cover and new material from the author that brings the story current through Turing’s pardon by the Queen. Enter our giveaway below to win a copy of the new edition of the book AND a $25.00 Fandango gift certificate.

This giveaway will run from November 11 through November 24 and is open to residents of the U.S. and Canada, aged 18 and older. No purchase is necessary. If you prefer to enter via email, please send a note to blog@press.princeton.edu. Please see complete terms and conditions below.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

PUP News of the World — October 23, 2014

NewsOfTheWorld_Banner

Each week we post a round-up of some of our most exciting national and international PUP book coverage. Reviews, interviews, events, articles — this is the spot for coverage of all things “PUP books” that took place in the last week. Enjoy!


Do Zombies Dream of Undead Sheep?

Just in time for your spooky Halloween week, the living dead has been spotted lurking in your local bookstore. But where? Check in the neuroscience section. Yes, you read that right.

With their endless wandering, lumbering gait, insatiable hunger, antisocial behavior, and apparently memory-less existence, zombies are the walking nightmares of our deepest fears. What do these characteristic behaviors reveal about the inner workings of the zombie mind? Could we diagnose zombism as a neurological condition by studying their behavior?

In Do Zombies Dream of Undead Sheep?: A Neuroscientific View of the Zombie Brain, neuroscientists and zombie enthusiasts Timothy Verstynen and Bradley Voytek apply their neuro-know-how to dissect the puzzle of what has happened to the zombie brain to make the undead act differently than their human prey.

Do Zombies Dream of Undead Sheep? is featured on Nerdist. Science editor Kyle Hill writes:

“Neuroscientists and zombie enthusiasts Timothy Verstynen and Bradley Voytek have recently come out with a new book called Do Zombies Dream of Undead Sheep?, in which they apply their neuroscience backgrounds to an investigation of the undead. It’s filled with pages of increasingly nerdy explorations of zombie behavior, and I highly recommend it, but what really caught my eye was the authors’ conclusion: All the walking dead have Consciousness Deficit Hypoactivity Disorder, or CDHD.”

Don’t be scared… check out this TED-Ed talk by Verstynen and Voytek (“Diagnosing a zombie: Brain and behavior”).

Do Zombies Dream of Undead Sheep? was also featured on the blog of the NPR-affiliate in San Diego KPBS and featured in U-T San Diego.

It’s all fun until someone gets bitten. While you still can, take a look at the introduction.

now 10.23

Cowardice

“Are you afraid to finish your book?” So begins a recent piece in the Times Higher Education by PUP author Chris Walsh. He continues:

My colleague was in the habit of needling his fellow scholars with this question. It struck particularly deep with me, because my book was about being afraid – or rather, it was about being excessively afraid and therefore failing to do what you should do. It was about cowardice.

For twenty years, Walsh has studied the topic of cowardice. What exactly is cowardice? When terrorists are called cowards, does it mean the same as when the term is applied to soldiers? And what, if anything, does cowardice have to do with the rest of us? His new book, fittingly named Cowardice: A Brief History, brings together sources from court-martial cases to literary and film classics such as Dante’s Inferno, The Red Badge of Courage, and The Thin Red Line, to recount the great harm that both cowards and the fear of seeming cowardly have done.

Walsh traces the idea of cowardice’s power to its evolutionary roots. But he also shows that this power has faded, most dramatically on the battlefield. Misconduct that earlier might have been punished as cowardice has more recently often been treated medically, as an adverse reaction to trauma, and Walsh explores a parallel therapeutic shift that reaches beyond war, into the realms of politics, crime, philosophy, religion, and love.

Cowardice is also reviewed on a Psychology Today blog. Glenn Altschuler writes:

“… a fresh and fascinating examination of the use of the term on – and off – the primal theater of cowardice, the battlefield.  Drawing on research in evolutionary biology as well as an informed interpretation of American history and literature, Walsh analyzes the relationship between courage and cowardice, the tendency to characterize men and not women as cowards, and the distinction between physical and moral cowardice.  Most important, Walsh argues, provocatively and persuasively, that over the past century the idea of cowardice has faded in significance, especially in military settings, and reappeared with somewhat different connotations.”

Check out this coverage of Cowardice in Inside Higher Ed, and preview the introduction for yourself.

 

Congratulations to Jean Tirole, recipient of 2014 Nobel Prize in Economic Science

Around this time last year the Press could not have been more excited. Why? Two of the three 2013 Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences awards went to PUP authors Lars Peter Hansen and Robert J. Shiller, authors of Robustness and Irrational Exuberance, respectively. To see just how excited we were, click here, here, or here. Amazingly enough, there was no shortage of excitement at the Press following this year’s announcement of the 2014 Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences award as Jean Tirole, author of Financial Crises, Liquidity, and the International Monetary System, The Theory of Corporate Finance, and co-author of Balancing the Banks: Global Lessons from the Financial Crisis, is the sole recipient.


“If we had more researchers like Jean Tirole it would be a very good thing for the world.”


The official Nobel Prize press release states Jean Tirole, head of economics at Toulouse University in France, won The Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel for 2014, “for his analysis of market power and regulation,” but this is just a fraction of the contribution he has made to economic theory and its real world implications. In an interview (which can be seen below) Chairman of the Committee for the Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel, Tore Ellingsen, praised Tirole for his tireless efforts to better understand and explain how governments could regulate industries dominated by monopolies. When asked if it was difficult to choose a winner for the award this year, Ellingsen explained, “Yes and no. It’s been clear for some time now that Jean Tirole is a worthy recipient, but the question has been for what, alone or with whom, and when?” The interview concludes with wishful thinking; “If we had more researches like Jean Tirole it would be a very good thing for the world.”

Tirole has been an active member and contributor to economic theory since the 1980′s, and although “his work is largely theoretical…it has translated easily to practical use.” As a New York Times article further notes, “[Tirole's] work is also wide ranging. A description of his influence published by the prize committee cited more than 60 papers, an unusually large number.”

Peter J. Dougherty, Director of Princeton University Press had the following to say about Tirole’s impact on the field of economics and his much deserved recognition. “Jean Tirole’s 2006 book, The Theory of Corporate Finance, marked an important moment in economics as well as in the history of Princeton’s economics list. We extend our most heartfelt congratulations to Professor Tirole on the occasion of his Nobel prize.”

Again, on behalf of all of us at PUP, we would like to congratulate and thank Jean Tirole for keeping the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences award in house. And who knows, maybe next year we’ll be posting about a three-peat… fingers crossed!