Voice of America features Steve and Tony Palumbi and Extreme Life of the Sea during #SharkWeek

Shark week is well underway and the celebrations and glamorizations of the most famous of ocean predators continues unabated. However, as the creators of Un-Shark Week and co-authors of The Extreme Life of the Sea, Steve and Tony Palumbi know there are other fascinating marine animals that are equally deserving of your attention. In this fantastic interview with Voice of America News, they highlight some cool facts about sharks as well as other extreme creatures that have adapted to survive and thrive in the harshest environments of the ocean.

 

bookjacket The Extreme Life of the Sea
Stephen R. Palumbi & Anthony R. Palumbi
Available as an ebook and an enhanced ebook.
Explore this title:

Reviews | Table of Contents | Prologue[PDF]

Hot off the Presses — Princeton University Press’s #NewBooks for this week

8-11 Art of DealArt of the Deal: Contemporary Art in a Global Financial Market
Noah Horowitz
With a new postscript by the author

“Art of the Deal is a crucial book on art and finance.”
–Blake Gopnik, Daily Beast

 

 

 

8-11 ConusConus of the Southeastern United States and Caribbean
Alan J. Kohn
Princeton Wild Guides

“World-class scholarship. This is a great book that takes readers on a scholarly grand tour from the earliest research history to the latest methodological approaches used to understand the biology and relationships of this intriguing group of gastropods. Kohn provides an amazing and unprecedented wealth of information.”–Rüdiger Bieler, coauthor of Seashells of Southern Florida

 

8-11 EntrepreneurialThe Entrepreneurial Group: Social Identities, Relations, and Collective Action
Martin Ruef

“Ruef explodes the myth of the lone entrepreneur, showing how those who start businesses assemble productive groups around themselves. He explains in a brilliant, original way how groups evolve into viable organizations and why some succeed while others fail. This is a must-read for anyone who wants to understand how entrepreneurs build businesses and why growing an enterprise is a team sport.”–Philip Anderson, INSEAD, director of the Rudolf and Valeria Maag International Centre for Entrepreneurship

 

8-11 Saved in AmericaGetting Saved in America: Taiwanese Immigration and Religious Experience
Carolyn Chen

“This book thus offers interesting points of view on the construction of identity and constitutes a good reference for understanding the family and religious traditions of the Taiwanese people: meaningful anecdotes, examples, and quotations, and a psychological approach.”–Hayet Sellami, China Perspectives

 

 

8-11 GoverningGoverning America: The Revival of Political History
Julian E. Zelizer

“Zelizer’s essays give the reader a good grasp of the ways that politics has unfolded over the past half century. And the range of topics gives a good sense of where the field lies at this point. The scholarship is impeccable, the sources appropriate, and the tone scholarly without being pedantic. As this collection of Zelizer’s finest work indicates, the discipline of history still has room for political history.”–John H. Barnhill, Canadian Journal of History

 

 

8-11 Moral DisquietMoral Disquiet and Human Life
Monique Canto-Sperber
Translated by Silvia Pavel

“[A]n extremely rich and wide-ranging work, written by one of the foremost contemporary moral philosophers in France. . . . Without at all sacrificing rigor, [Monique Canto-Sperber] demonstrates in a most resounding way that philosophy at its very best is plentiful in its resources to speak quite illuminatingly to the circumstances of life that agonize us so.”–Laurence Thomas, Ethics

 

 

8-11 presidential LeadershipPresidential Leadership and the Creation of the American Era
Joseph S. Nye, Jr.

“Sometimes the best presidential decisions are decisions not to act. This point is made in an excellent new book by Joseph Nye of Harvard University entitled Presidential Leadership and the Creation of the American Era.”–Gideon Rachman, Financial Times

 

 

 

8-11 TurthTruth
Alexis G. Burgess & John P. Burgess

Truth is remarkably succinct. . . . Yet it covers a great amount of ground with accessible discussions of a variety of topics. . . . [I]ntelligent and provocative.”–Michael P. Lynch, Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews

 

 

 

8-11 Black HoleWhat Does a Black Hole Look Like?
Charles D. Bailyn

“This book goes straight to the heart of astronomical intuition and evidence about black holes. Written in a highly accessible style, it provides enough information to educate an undergraduate astronomy or physics major without going into the many details required in a graduate class. I think students will greatly enjoy this book and derive significant insight from it.”–Coleman Miller, University of Maryland, College Park

 


Fun Fact Friday: Making Sense of Mandibles

Today’s fun fact for Beetles of Eastern North America by Arthur V. Evans takes an inside look at the stag beetle’s best accessory: his mandibles. Why do they have them? What do they use them for? Hold tight to find out!

Did you know? Photo Credit: Arthur V. Evans, Beetles of Eastern North America

The common name “stag beetle” refers to the large antlerlike mandibles found in some males, such as the giant stag beetle Lucanus elaphus (See middle frame at right). Mandible size within a species is “directly proportionate to the size of the body and regulated by genetic and environmental factors.”

Why do they have them?
Males use these oversized mouthparts to fight with rival males over who gets to take the lady beetle to dinner. You can find these beetles in moist habitats where there are plenty of things dying, like  a swamp. An area with decomposing wood is the ideal hideaway for these critters, since they drink tree sap and flower nectar, and munch on decaying deciduous and coniferous wood. But that’s good new for us: no home damagers here!

Bonus Fact:
The Family Lucanidae supposedly got its name when Pliny the Elder noted that Nigidius (a scholar of the Late Roman Republic and a friend of Cicero) called the stag beetle lucanus after the Italian region of Lucania, where they were turned into amulets for children. The scientific name of Lucanus cervus is the former word, plus cervus, deer.

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Arthur V. Evans is the author of:

Evans_Beetles Beetles of Eastern North America by Arthur V. Evans
Paperback | 2014 | $35.00 / £24.95 | ISBN: 9780691133041 | 560 pp. | 8 x 10 | 1,500+ color illus. 31 line illus. | eBook | ISBN: 9781400851829 | Reviews  Table of Contents  Preface[PDF]  Sample Entry[PDF]

Hot off the Presses — Princeton University Press’s #NewBooks for this week

8-6 Against SecurityAgainst Security: How We Go Wrong at Airports, Subways, and Other Sites of Ambiguous Danger
Harvey Molotch (With a new preface by the author)

“Mr. Molotch . . . present(s) a vivid picture of the ways in which poorly designed security measures can deform everyday life and defeat themselves.”–Jordan Ellenberg, Wall Street Journal

 

 

 

8-7 GarveyThe Age of Garvey: How a Jamaican Activist Created a Mass Movement and Changed Global Black Politics
Adam Ewing

“At last, an account of Garveyism worthy of its historic influence. Taking a unique approach to the twentieth century’s first black power movement, Ewing shows how Garveyism became a dynamic force in the politics of the interwar years. His superlative book bridges the genres of intellectual, social, and cultural history to serve as a model for the study of transnationalism.”–Vincent Brown, author of The Reaper’s Garden

 

 
8-7 Aristotle's EthicsAristotle’s Ethics: Writings from the Complete Works
Aristotle
Revised, edited, and with an introduction by Jonathan Barnes & Anthony Kenny

Reviews from The Complete Works of Aristotle: “This new edition makes a landmark of scholarship available in a very usable form.”–Library Journal

 

 

 

8-7 Atlas of CitiesAtlas of Cities
Edited by Paul Knox
With a foreword by Richard Florida

“This is an atlas with a difference. It broaches the complexity of the urban experience directly and in a beautifully persuasive graphical way, showing how this great variety of city types and features can be explained both chronologically and geographically. A wonderful book of new insights about how our contemporary cities have evolved.” –Michael Batty, author of The New Science of Cities

Sample this book: http://press.princeton.edu/chapters/i10307.pdf

8-7 Bee BookThe Bee: A Natural History
Noah Wilson-Rich
With contributions from Kelly Allin, Norman Carreck & Andrea Quigley
Earth is home to more than 20,000 bee species, from fluorescent-colored orchid bees and sweat bees to flower-nesting squash bees and leaf-cutter bees. This book takes an incomparable look at this astounding diversity, blending an engaging narrative with practical, hands-on discussions of such topics as beekeeping and bee health. It explores our relationship with the bee over evolutionary time, delving into how it came to be, where it stands today, and what the future holds for humanity and bees alike.

 

8-7 SlaveryBetween Slavery and Capitalism: The Legacy of Emancipation in the American South
Martin Ruef

“It would seem difficult to add any new knowledge to the history of the southern economy after the Civil War. But Martin Ruef has done just that. By arguing that the reconstruction of the southern economy was an uncertain and conflict-riven process, he suggests that the options that were pursued were a complex social construction that reflected the relative power of planters and their former slaves. Put simply, producing a labor market involved the construction of a new model of racial employment in the South. Ruef’s book uses previously unexploited data sources to examine the construction of this market from the bottom up and shows how this affected the life chances of African Americans for at least two generations.”–Neil D. Fligstein, University of California, Berkeley

8-7 Family ValuesFamily Values: The Ethics of Parent-Child Relationships
Harry Brighouse & Adam Swift

“Family Values is an important book on a neglected topic by two excellent scholars. It advances an original argument, and does so clearly and accessibly. Highly recommended.”–Stephen Macedo, Princeton University

 

 

 

8-7 GreenGreen: The History of a Color
Michel Pastoureau

“Beautifully illustrated.”–Daily Mail

 

 

8-7 Hidden ProcessesHidden Markov Processes: Theory and Applications to Biology
M. Vidyasagar

“This book provides a terrific introduction to an important and widely studied field–Markov processes (including hidden Markov processes)–with a particular view toward applications to problems in biology. With a wonderful balance of rigor, intuition, and choice of topics, the book gives a unique treatment of the subject for those interested in both fundamental theory and important applications.”–Sanjeev Kulkarni, Princeton University

 

 

 

8-7 OriginsThe Origins and History of Consciousness
Erich Neumann
With a foreword by C.G. Jung
Translated by R.F.C. Hull

“There can be no doubt that [Neumann] has brought to his task a remarkable . . . knowledge of classical mythology, some considerable acquaintance with the comparative study of religion, and a deep understanding of those psychological views and theories evolved by C. G. Jung.”–The Times Literary Supplement

 

 

8-7 ParadoxesParadoxes of Liberal Democracy: Islam, Western Europe, and the Danish Cartoon Crisis
Paul M. Sniderman, Michael Bang Petersen, Rune Slothuus & Rune Stubager

“Taking its starting point from the infamous Danish cartoon crisis and the clash of democratic values and Muslim fundamentalism that followed, this engagingly written, methodologically sophisticated, and creative study of public opinion adds substantially to a growing body of research into this ‘clash of civilizations’. The views of the Danish majority, far from scapegoating and vilifying the Muslim minority, distinguished carefully and intelligently between upholding the rights of this minority to live as Danish citizens while at the same time restricting freedoms for those associated with the threat of fundamentalist violence. This superb analysis of the nuances of public morality convincingly eschews simple answers to important and complex questions.”–Geoffrey Evans, University of Oxford

8-7 PenguinsPenguins: The Ultimate Guide
Tui De Roy, Mark Jones & Julie Cornthwaite

“The imagery in this book is incredible. Penguins is not only attractive and entertaining, but also an authoritative and easy-to-use reference. It is unlike any other book on the subject.”—Alvaro Jaramillo, author of Birds of Chile

 

 

8-7 EvangelicalThe Politics of Evangelical Identity: Local Churches and Partisan Divides in the United States and Canada
Lydia Bean

The Politics of Evangelical Identity is a bracing corrective to the perception of evangelicals as theological stooges mesmerized by the spell of conservative masterminds. Bean persuasively argues that the appeal of conservatives in the evangelical base has far more to do with how they connect the political to everyday spiritual and religious practices. Her path-clearing and transformative book brilliantly engages the political perspectives, moral passions, and religious beliefs of evangelicals from a practical, grounded perspective.”–Michael Eric Dyson, Georgetown University

 

8-7 ProfaneProfane Culture
Paul E. Willis
With a new preface by the author

A classic of British cultural studies, Profane Culture takes the reader into the worlds of two important 1960s youth cultures—the motor-bike boys and the hippies. Both groups were involved in an unequal but heroic fight to produce meaning and their own cultural forms in the face of a larger society dominated by the capitalist media and commercialism. They were pioneers of cultural experimentation, the self-construction of identity, and the curating of the self, which, in different ways, have become so widespread today.

Sample this book: http://press.princeton.edu/chapters/s10358.pdf

8-7 ReflectionA Reflection of Reality: Selected Readings in Contemporary Chinese Short Stories
Chih-p’ing Chou, Liping Yu & Joanne Chiang

“Chinese instruction is not only about teaching linguistic forms and their usages, but also about helping students obtain knowledge of Chinese culture and society. This timely book successfully achieves both of these goals by exposing students to literary works and language materials that are vivid and rich. A Reflection of Reality sets a model for teaching Chinese.”—Lening Liu, Columbia University

Sample this book: http://press.princeton.edu/chapters/s10387.pdf

8-7 Silent SexThe Silent Sex: Gender, Deliberation, and Institutions
Christopher F. Karpowitz & Tali Mendelberg

“This pathbreaking book brings us the latest research on why, in most public situations, women don’t speak up as much as men. It’s not just confidence–institutions matter, too. Sensitive and compelling, The Silent Sex is a must-read for anyone who cares about gender equality.”–Jane Mansbridge, Harvard Kennedy School

 

 

 

8-7 LinearTopics in Quaternion Linear Algebra
Leiba Rodman

“This is a very serious treatise by an author who is a powerful researcher and a clear expositor. I know of no other book that treats both the basic theory and advanced material as carefully and as comprehensively as this one. Topics in Quaternion Linear Algebra is a singular contribution of considerable value.”—Douglas R. Farenick, author of Algebras of Linear Transformations

Sample this book: http://press.princeton.edu/chapters/s10408.pdf

 

 

8-7 GenderWhy Gender Matters in Economics
Mukesh Eswaran

“This thoughtful, energetic, creative, and engaging book does a terrific job reviewing and explaining some of the most interesting economic research on gender in recent years. It fills an important gap in the gender and economics literature.”—Nancy Folbre, professor emeritus of economics, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Sample this book: http://press.princeton.edu/chapters/s10362.pdf

 

8-7 Why TolerateWhy Tolerate Religion?
Brian Leiter
With a new preface by the author

“A model of clarity and rigour and at points strikingly original, this is a book that anyone who thinks seriously about religion, ethics and politics will benefit from reading.”–John Gray, New Statesman

 

 

 

In the News: Ghaziani Goes Global with ‘There Goes the Gayborhood?’

8-6 AminGayborhoods. Rising Rents. De-Gaying. ‘Straightening.’

What does it all mean?

Princeton University Press author and associate professor of Sociology Amin Ghaziani has dedicated his life’s work to defining these terms and to bringing the study of sexuality to the forefront of sociology. Naturally, the intent of his latest book, There Goes the Gayborhood? is no different.

In many respects, the book is an ode to the enclaves which have historically acted as havens of support, providing community and allowing those with common sociopolitical goals to coalesce in their quest for equality, meanwhile striking rich friendships and developing culturally vibrant and economically robust neighborhoods.

Throughout the book, Ghaziani analyzes deep demographic data looking for trends of same-sex and straight households moving in and out of traditionally gay neighborhoods like San Francisco’s Castro district, Chicago’s Boystown, and New York’s Chelsea and Hell’s Kitchen neighborhoods. His findings show that gay neighborhoods are becoming decidedly less “gay”—the number of gay men who live in gay neighborhoods has declined eight per cent while the number of lesbians has dropped 13 per cent in the last 10 years. He also found that other areas of the country are becoming more diverse with same-sex reported households in 93% of the counties in America.

The amount of media attention to Ghaziani’s book, and particularly to his unique sociological diagnosis of this issue, has been nearly as overwhelming as his findings. Mainstream media outlets like Time Magazine,  Yahoo! News, Chicago NPR’s “Morning Shift,” Huffington Post’s “Gay Voices” and Huffington Post: Live, and the Chicago Tribune, among others, have responded accordingly to the radical realization of “straightening.” Salon has also paid due diligence to the dilemma, asking, “[A]s demographics shift, is it a sign of acceptance of a community – or the dilution of it? Is it possible, as the New York Times so damningly put it, that “gay neighborhoods face the prospect of becoming passe?””


“Gay neighborhoods have been crucial to the struggle for freedom, and have produced globally important contributions, from politics to poetry to music and fashion,” Ghaziani says. “[I]t is critical that we continue to find meaningful ways to preserve these culturally important spaces.”


Fortunately, Ghaziani’s own commentary in the Advocate rejects the claim that ‘gayborhoods’ are growing increasingly obsolete, no longer a necessary comfort to the gay community. He says that, “[t]here is a fine line between acceptance and the closet, just as there is between integration into the mainstream and the cultural loss of what makes gay people unique.” Although LGBT individuals have become “incorporated into the societal mainstream,” there’s no reason to dismiss such an integral and distinctive feature of the gay community.

And that’s not all the coverage. Not even close. The book has received recognition from French and German news outlets as well, in addition to an array of exclusively gay media sites like Pink News (Europe’s largest gay news service), Towleroad, and Joe.My.God, and we’re sure that the buck won’t stop there.

Even with this blitz of interest, though, it’s important to bear in mind the essence of Ghaziani’s argument: he is fundamentally fighting for these communities and seeking ways to preserve them without naively denying the realities of urban change. All neighborhoods change, of course, and gayborhoods are no exception. But they are evolving in unique ways as the long arc of the moral universe bends toward justice.

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Amin Ghaziani is the author of:

TGTG There Goes the Gayborhood? by Amin Ghaziani
Hardcover | 2014 | $35.00 / £24.95 | ISBN: 9780691158792 | 360 pp. | 6 x 9 | 5 halftones. 2 line illus. 15 tables. 6 maps.| eBook | ISBN: 9781400850174 | Reviews Table of Contents  Introduction[PDF]

Princeton University Press at the Ecological Society of America annual meeting

If you’re heading to the Ecological Society of America annual meeting in Sacramento, CA August 10th-15th, come visit us at booth 303!

Louis Gross, co-author of Mathematics for the Life Sciences, will be speaking in the demo area of the exhibit hall at noon on Wednesday, August 13th. All are welcome to then join us at the booth that evening at 5:00 for wine, cheese, and a book signing!

The life sciences deal with a vast array of problems at different spatial, temporal, and organizational scales. The mathematics necessary to describe, model, and analyze these problems is similarly diverse, incorporating quantitative techniques that are rarely taught in standard undergraduate courses. This textbook provides an accessible introduction to these critical mathematical concepts, linking them to biological observation and theory while also presenting the computational tools needed to address problems not readily investigated using mathematics alone.

Follow us on Twitter @PrincetonUPress for updates on the meeting and new and forthcoming titles.

Also be sure to browse our biology catalog, which lists many books for sale at our booth:

See you in Sacramento!

Princeton University Press’s best-selling books for the past week

These are the best-selling books for the past week.

1177 BC: The Year Civilization Collapsed by Eric H. Cline
shtetl The Golden Age Shtetl: A New History of Jewish Life in East Europe by Yohanan Petrovsky-Shtern
Fawcett_Liberalism_S14
Liberalism: The Life of an Idea by Edmund Fawcett
Fernandez_Everyday cover Everyday Calculus: Discovering the Hidden Math All around Us by Oscar E. Fernandez
Carlson_Tesla jacket Tesla: Inventor of the Electrical Age by W. Bernard Carlson
thebox
The Box: How the Shipping Container Made the World Smaller and the World Economy Bigger by Marc Levinson
OnBullshit On Bullshit by Harry G. Frankfurt
The Five Elements of Effective Thinking The 5 Elements of Effective Thinking by Edward B. Burger and Michael Starbird
I Ching The I Ching or Book of Changes, edited by Hellmut Wilhelm, translated by Cary F. Baynes
SouloftheWorld
The Soul of the World by Roger Scruton

 

Fun Facts about Caribbean Wildlife

Raffaele_WildlifeCaribbeanS14Did you know…

  • Residents of colonial Cuba could be punished for insulting the Cuban Trogon, a red-breasted bird whose plumage was seen as representing the red sash worn by Spanish kings.
  • Ackee with salt fish is Jamaica’s national dish, but the fruit can be highly poisonous if harvested or cooked incorrectly
  • The earliest attempt to import breadfruit into the Caribbean was thwarted by a famous mutiny — the one on the H.M.S. Bounty, which was carrying the seedlings among its cargo.
  • You can tell which way the wind blows on a given island by looking at the coconut palm trees, which often leans in the direction of the prevailing breeze.
  • The Caribbean is home to dozens of species of bats, about half of which are endemic to the islands.
  • The Red Junglefowl found in the Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico and the Grenadines is actually the feral offspring of formerly domesticated roosters and chickens.
  • Crocodiles are native to Cuba, Jamaica, the Dominican Republic, and Haiti.
  • Barracudas have been known to attack divers wearing sparkly clothing, which they can mistake for prey.
  • The black grouper can grow to four feet long and change its sex from female to male.
  • The Caribbean spiny lobster can swim backwards by flipping its tail.

Whether you are traveling to the Caribbean by plane or by cruise ship, make sure you pack a copy of Wildlife of the Caribbean by Herbert A. Raffaele and James W. Wiley so you can learn more about the birds, fish, mammals, and plants you might see.

 

Credit — these fun facts were included in About.com Caribbean Travel’s review of Wildlife of the Caribbean.

A new effective thinking puzzle challenge from Ed Burger

burdger photo

Ed Burger, co-author of The 5 Elements of Effective Thinking, spent the day at this leadership workshop at Eastern Michigan University. The assembled group solved creative puzzles using the skills found in the book. Put your own skills to the test with this mathimagical puzzle:

What’s black and red and magical all over?

Consider the following mathematical illusion: A regular deck of 52 playing cards is shuffled several times by an audience member until everyone agrees that the cards are completely shuffled. Then, without looking at the cards themselves, the magician divides the deck into two equal piles of 26 cards. The magician taps both piles of face-down cards three times. Then, one by one, the magician reveals the cards of both piles. Magically, the magician is able to have the cards arrange themselves so that the number of cards showing black suits in the first pie is identical to the number of cards showing red suits in the second pile. Your challenge is to figure out the secret to this illusion and then perform it for your friends.
 
Post your best guess below.

To quickly and easily improve your effective thinking skills, check out Ed Burger and Michael Starbird’s book. You can read a free excerpt here.

PUP News of the World — August 4, 2014

NewsOfTheWorld_Banner

Each week we post a round-up of some of our most exciting national and international PUP book coverage. Reviews, interviews, events, articles–this is the spot for coverage of all things “PUP books” that took place in the last week. Enjoy!


now 8.4

THE GOLDEN AGE SHTETL

Ready to take a trip back in time? Our destination? The shtetl. THE GOLDEN AGE SHTETL: A New History of Jewish Life in East Europe by Yohanan Petrovsky-Shtern provides the first grassroots social, economic, and cultural history of the shtetl. Challenging popular misconceptions of the shtetl as an isolated, ramshackle Jewish village stricken by poverty and pogroms, Yohanan Petrovsky-Shtern argues that, in its heyday from the 1790s to the 1840s, the shtetl was a thriving Jewish community as vibrant as any in Europe.

The Golden Age Shtetl is reviewed in the New York Times Book Review. Jonathan Rosen writes:

Petrovsky-Shtern…succeeds in vividly evoking a Jewish world that survived not merely in spite of its neighbors but in complex collaboration with them….[A] moving feat of cultural reclamation and even, in its way, an act of quiet heroism.

In essence, the shtetl was a Polish private town belonging to a Catholic magnate, administratively run by the tsarist empire, yet economically driven by Jews. This book shows how its success hinged on its unique position in this triangle of power–as did its ultimate suppression. Shtetls were home to two-thirds of East Europe’s Jews in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, yet it has long been one of the most neglected and misunderstood chapters of the Jewish experience.

Petrovsky-Shtern brings this golden age to life, looking at dozens of shtetls and drawing on a wealth of never-before-used archival material. He reconstructs the rich social tapestry of these market towns, showing how Russian clerks put the shtetl on the empire’s map, and chronicling how shtetl Jews traded widely, importing commodities from France, Austria, Prussia, and even the Ottoman Empire.

Our website has a preview of the book — see Chapter One here.

THE AMAZING WORLD OF FLYING FISH

Don’t be mistaken — we haven’t dipped into the fiction section with this next title. THE AMAZING WORLD OF FLYING FISH by Stephen N. G. Howell explores the beautiful flying fish as you’ve never seen it before.

If you travel the open ocean anywhere in the tropics, you are very likely to see flyingfish. These beautifully colored “ocean butterflies” shoot out of the water and sail on majestic, winglike pectoral fins to escape from predators such as dolphins, swordfish, and tuna. Some can travel for more than six hundred feet per flight. Yet despite their prevalence in warm ocean waters and their vital role in the tropical food chain, surprisingly little is known about flyingfish—more than 60 species are said to exist, but nobody is sure of the number.

The pictures in this book are amazing. For a sneak peek, check out this slideshow on the Wall Street Journal‘s website with pictures like the one below. A full slideshow of pictures is available on the WSJ website.flyingfish

The Amazing World of Flying Fish is also reviewed in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, where Scott Shalaway calls the it “a memorizing natural history.”

This beautifully illustrated book features more than 90 stunning color photos by renowned naturalist Steve Howell, as well as a concise and accessible text that explores the natural history of flyingfish, where they can be found, how and why they fly, what colors they are, what they eat and what eats them, and more. View Chapter One of The Amazing World of Flying Fish for yourself.

THERE GOES THE GAYBORHOOD?

There goes the gayborhood? Gay neighborhoods, like the legendary Castro District in San Francisco and New York’s Greenwich Village, have long provided sexual minorities with safe havens in an often unsafe world. But as our society increasingly accepts gays and lesbians into the mainstream, are “gayborhoods” destined to disappear? Our next book featured this week provides an incisive look at the origins of these unique cultural enclaves, the reasons why they are changing today, and their prospects for the future.

THERE GOES THE GAYBORHOOD? by Amin Ghaziani argues that political gains and societal acceptance are allowing gays and lesbians to imagine expansive possibilities for a life beyond the gayborhood. Ghaziani draws on a wealth of evidence–including census data, opinion polls, hundreds of newspaper reports from across the United States, and more than one hundred original interviews with residents in Chicago, one of the most paradigmatic cities in America.

There Goes the Gayborhood? is featured in the Chicago Tribune. Ghaziani is quoted in the piece, talking about his time spent in Chicago’s Boystown:

“My friends and I began to notice changes in the character and composition of the neighborhood,” he said. “We’d notice more straight couples holding hands and more baby strollers. That became a symbol. Oftentimes a sex store would close and a nail salon would open in its place. Some people feel territorial about Boystown: ‘Why do straight people have to come and take over one spot we have?’ Other people said this is great; isn’t this what we’ve been fighting for?”

Check out the full feature, entitled “‘Gayborhoods’ are changing, researcher finds.”

Ghaziani’s title is discussed in an article on the front page of the Vancouver Sun. Yahoo Canada and the Huffington Post, Canada also pick up the story. Want to know more? Read the introduction of There Goes the Gayborhood? here.

Physics Today Q&A with Chris Quigg, Author of Gauge Theories of the Strong, Weak, and Electromagnetic Interactions

quigg2In the July 2014 edition of Physics Today, Princeton University Press author Chris Quigg sits down with Stephen Blau and Jermey Matthews to talk particle physics and gauge theories.

A member of the Theoretical Physics Department of the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Mr. Quigg also received the American Physical Society’s 2011 J. J. Sakurai Prize for outstanding achievement in particle theory. His books include Gauge Theories of the Strong, Weak, and Electromagnetic Interactions (2013) and the 1993 edition of the Annual Review of Nuclear and Particle Science.

The following questions have been excerpted from Physics Today:

PT: What is your assessment of the current state of particle physics, including the quality and enthusiasm of current students? With the excitement over the Higgs and other advances, are you concerned that the field might be overhyped?

Quigg: It is an immensely exciting time. In common with many areas of physics and astronomy, particle physics has many challenging questions and the means to address them. Our students and postdocs are highly motivated, talented, and intensely curious. It’s a test for our institutions, including funding agencies, to create rewarding career paths for the young people drawn to science by the excitement of our work.

When I was hiking in Europe in the weeks before the Higgs discovery was announced, it seemed that everyone I met wanted to know what was happening [at the LHC] in Geneva. Sharing our explorations with the public is good for science and good for society.


“Sharing our explorations with the public is good for science and good for society.”


PT: What are the most exciting questions you see the particle-physics community answering in the short term, say within 10 years?

Quigg: I close the new edition of Gauge Theories with a list of 20 outstanding questions—many with multiple parts—and 1 great meta-question: How are we prisoners of conventional thinking?

Within 10 years we will certainly have a much more complete understanding of electroweak symmetry breaking and the character of the Higgs boson. The initial LHC results have shaken theorists out of a certain complacency; specifically, a lot of received wisdom about naturalness and supersymmetry is being reexamined. Searches for dark matter are reaching a decisive stage. Studies of processes that are highly suppressed in the standard model, such as lepton-flavor violation, flavor-changing neutral currents, and permanent electric dipole moments, will reach ever more interesting levels of sensitivity. A world with massive neutrinos poses questions about the nature of neutrino mixing, the existence of sterile neutrinos, and the character of the neutrino—is it a Dirac particle, a Majorana particle, or both? I suspect that we will find new phenomena in the strong interactions that teach us about the great richness of QCD.

Read the rest of this fascinating interview here

______________________________________________________________________________________________

Chris Quigg is the author of:

gauge Gauge Theories of the Strong, Weak, and Electromagnetic Interactions by Chris Quigg
Hardcover | 2013 | $75.00 / £52.00 | ISBN: 9780691135489
496 pp. | 7 x 10 | 150 line illus. 17 tables. | eBook | ISBN: 9781400848225 | Reviews   Table of Contents   Chapter 1[PDF]   Illustration Package 

Fun Fact Friday: Bizarre Mating Rituals of the Male Beetle

Ah, Friday. Do you hear that? It’s the sound of abundant spare time, rife with the possibility of reading, gardening, eating, and…listening to mating calls?

Beetle1

In this week’s edition of Fun Fact Friday, we bring you the mating rituals of the male beetle, particularly those of the Family Ptinidae.

Did you know?

In his forthcoming book, Beetles of Eastern North America, Arthur V. Evans enlightens us to the truly absurd habits of death-watch beetles, who bang their heads against the walls of their wooden galleries to lure females into their tunnels. They’re in a class of their own, however; most beetles produce sound by rubbing together two ridged or roughened surfaces in a process known as stridulation. Stridulation generally transpires “during courtship, confrontations with other beetles, or in response to other stressful situations, such as an attack by a predator.”

For the most part, beetles don’t partake in fancy wooing practices; there are no flowers or free meals to speak of. But it seems there’s some soft music and chivalry involved, after all. So now you know!

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Arthur V. Evans is the author of:

7-24 Beetles2 Beetles of Eastern North America by Arthur V. Evans
Paperback | 2014 | $35.00 / £24.95 | ISBN: 9780691133041
560 pp. | 8 x 10 | 1,500+ color illus. 31 line illus.| eBook | ISBN: 9781400851829 | Reviews   Table of Contents  Preface[PDF] Sample Entry[PDF]