The Warbler Guide App Blog Tour, Day 4

Digital formats allow authors and developers to present images in new and exciting ways. For The Warbler Guide App, Tom Stephenson and Scott Whittle took it all the way by commissioning exclusive 3D illustrations that allow users to literally spin and flip a warbler to any angle. Better yet, you can spin and flip two warblers side by side for quick comparisons. So, when you spot a bird from a strange angle, you can quickly replicate that view in the app and compare it with similar species.

For today’s tour stop, the American Birding Association presents an exclusive video of the visual elements of The Warbler Guide App including a preview of this 3D capability.

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Please support our blog tour participants by visiting their sites:

Day 3:

warblerwatch

Day 2:

drunk

 

prairie

Day 1:

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The Warbler Guide App Blog Tour, Day 2

The week-long celebration of all things warbler continues today with an article from our favorite inebriated birder that gives some insight into how UK birders think about warblers – The Drunkbirder – and a photo quiz and opportunity to win a copy of the app from The Prairie Birder in Canada.

Please support our blog tour participants by visiting their sites:

 

drunk

 

prairie

 

You can also revisit where the fun began by checking out this video posted at Birding Is Fun:

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The Warbler Guide App Blog Tour, Day 1

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Warbler tour small

Visit Birding Is Fun today to view an exclusive video that shows how sounds are incorporated into The Warbler Guide App.

Look for our tour stop logo this week for more exclusive material. We hope the app will be live on iTunes any day now, in time for your holiday shopping!

 

 

 

“On the third day…” The Twelve Grimm Days of Christmas

We are delighted to share these stories from The Complete First Edition of The Original Folk and Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm with our readers. This series will run for 12 days and each story is accompanied by original art from Andrea Dezsö.

Three sisters

The Three Sisters

Once upon a time there was a rich king who was so rich that he believed his wealth would last forever. Therefore, he wallowed in luxury and gambled on a golden board with silver dice. All this continued for some time until he squandered his wealth and was forced to mortgage his cities and castles one after the other. Finally, nothing was left except an old castle in the forest. He moved there with his queen and three daughters, and their lives were miserable: they had only potatoes to eat for their daily meal.

One day the king decided to go hunting to see if he could perhaps shoot a hare. After filling his pocket full of potatoes, he went off to a nearby forest that nobody dared enter because terrible stories had been told about what one might encounter there, such as bears that ate people, eagles that hacked out eyes, and wolves, lions, and all kinds of cruel beasts. However, the king was not in the least afraid and went straight into the forest. At first he didn’t see anything except huge and mighty trees, and everything was quiet beneath them. After he had walked around for a while, he became hungry and sat down underneath a tree to eat his potatoes. All of a sudden a bear came out of the thicket, trotted straight toward him, and growled, “How dare you sit under my honey tree! You’ll pay for this!”

The king was horrified and handed the bear his potatoes to appease him. But the bear began to speak and said, “I don’t want your potatoes. I’m going to eat you yourself. But, if you give me your oldest daughter, you can you save yourself ! If you do this, I’ll give you a hundred pounds of gold in the bargain.”

Since the king was afraid of being eaten, he said, “You shall have her. Just let me go in peace.”

The bear showed him the way out of the forest and growled after him, “In a week’s time I’ll come and fetch my bride.”

As he went home, the king felt more at ease and was convinced that the bear would not be able to crawl through a keyhole. So from then on everything at the castle was to be shut tight. He ordered all the gates to be locked, the drawbridges to be lifted, and told his daughter not to worry.

But just to be on the safe side and to protect his daughter from the bear bridegroom, he gave her a little room under the pinnacle high up in the castle. She was to hide there until the week was over.

Early on the seventh morning, however, when everyone was still asleep, a splendid coach drawn by six horses came driving up to the castle. It was surrounded by numerous knights clad in gold, and as soon as the coach was in front, the drawbridges dropped down by themselves, and the locks sprung open without keys. The coach drove into the courtyard, and a young, handsome prince stepped out. When the king was wakened by the noise and looked out the window, he saw the prince had already fetched his oldest daughter from the locked room and was lifting her into the coach. He could just call after her:

“Farewell, my maiden dear.
I see you’re off to wed the bear.”

She waved to him with her little white handkerchief from the coach, and then they sped off into the magic forest as if the coach were harnessed to the wind. The king felt very bad about having given his daughter to a bear. He was so sad that he and the queen wept for three days. But on the fourth day, after he had done enough weeping, he realized that he couldn’t change what had happened and went down into the courtyard. There he found a chest made out of smooth wood, which was very difficult to lift. Immediately he remembered what the bear had promised him. So he opened it and found a hundred pounds of glittering and glistening gold.

When the king saw the gold, he felt consoled. He reacquired his cities and kingdom and began leading his former life of luxury once more. Soon after, he was obliged to mortgage everything all over again, and he retreated to his castle in the forest and had nothing to eat but potatoes. Yet the king still had a falcon, and one day the king took it hunting with him and went out into the field to get something better to eat. The falcon soared high into the sky and flew in the direction of the dark magic forest, which the king no longer dared enter. Right after the falcon flew into the woods, an eagle shot out and pursued the falcon, which returned to the king, who tried to fend off the eagle with his spear. But the eagle grabbed the spear and broke it like a reed. Then the eagle crushed the falcon with one claw and dug into the king’s shoulder with the other.

“Why have you disturbed my kingdom in the sky?” the eagle cried out. “Either you give me your second daughter for my wife, or you shall die!”

“All right,” the king said. “You shall have my second daughter, but what will you give me for her?”

“Two hundred pounds of gold,” the eagle said. “In seven weeks I’ll come to fetch her.”

Then the eagle let him go and flew off into the forest. The king felt bad about having also sold his second daughter to a wild beast and didn’t dare tell her anything about it. Six weeks passed, and in the seventh the princess went out one day on the lawn in front of the castle to water the linseed. All at once a splendid parade of handsome knights came riding up, and at their head was the handsomest knight of all, who dismounted and cried out:

“Up you go, my maiden dear.
Come wed the eagle. No need to fear!”

And before she could answer him, he had already lifted her onto his horse and raced off with her into the forest, flying like a bird. Farewell! Farewell!

The king and queen waited a long time for the princess to come back to the castle, but no matter how long they waited, she didn’t return. Then the king finally revealed that he had promised her to an eagle when he had once been in trouble, and the eagle must have fetched her. After the king got over his sadness somewhat, he remembered the eagle’s promise, went down to the lawn, and found two golden eggs, each weighing one hundred pounds. “Money is a sign of piety,” thought the king, and he dismissed all gloomy thoughts from his mind. He resumed his merrymaking once more and lived luxuriously until he ran through the two hundred pounds of gold. Then the king returned to the castle in the forest, and the last of the princesses had to boil the potatoes.

The king didn’t want to hunt any more hares in the forest or any more birds in the sky, but he did desire to eat some fish. So the princess had to weave a net, which he took with him to a pond not far from the castle. A small boat was there, and he got in and threw the net into the water. On his very first try he caught a bunch of beautiful flounders with red speckles, but when he wanted to row ashore with his catch, the boat wouldn’t budge, and he couldn’t get it to move, no matter how much he tried. All of a sudden an enormous whale came puffing up to him and cried out, “Who said you could catch the subjects of my realm and take them away with you? This will cost you your life!”

As the whale said this, he opened his jaws as if he were going to swallow the king and the little boat as well. When the king saw his terrible jaws, he completely lost his courage and recalled that he had a third daughter.

“Spare my life,” he cried out, “and you shall have my third daughter!” “That’s fine with me,” roared the whale. “I’ll also give you something for her. I don’t have gold. That’s not good enough for me. But the floor of my sea is plastered with precious pearls. I’ll give you three sacks full of them. In the seventh month I’ll come and fetch my bride.”

Then he dived down into the water, while the king rowed ashore and brought the flounders home. Yet, when they were baked, he refused to eat any of them, and when he looked at his daughter, the only one left and the most beautiful and loveliest of them all, he felt as if a thousand knives were cutting his heart. Six months passed, and the queen and princess didn’t know what was wrong with the king, for he didn’t smile once during all that time. In the seventh month the princess was in the courtyard in front of a man-made well and drew a glass of water. Suddenly a coach with six white horses and men clad entirely in silver came driving up. A prince stepped out of the coach, and he was more handsome than any other prince she had ever seen in her life. He asked her for a glass of water, and when she handed it to him, he embraced her and lifted her into the coach. Then they drove back through the gate over the field toward the pond.

“Farewell, you maiden dear.
You’re bound to wed the whale down there.”

The queen stood at the window and watched the coach as it moved off in the distance. When she was unable to find her daughter, her heart was saddened, and she called her and looked for her everywhere. But the daughter was nowhere to be seen or heard. When the queen was certain the princess could not be found, she began to weep, and now the king revealed to her that a whale must have fetched their daughter, for he had been forced to promise their daughter to him. Indeed, that was the reason he had been so sad. The king wanted to comfort his wife and told her about the great treasure they would now get for the princess. However, the queen didn’t want to hear anything about it and said her only child was more dear to her than all the treasures of the world.

During the time that the whale prince had carried off the princess, his servants had carried three tremendous sacks into the castle, which the king found at the door. When he opened them, he found they were full of big, beautiful, and precious pearls, just as large as the fattest peas imaginable. All of a sudden he was rich again and richer than he had ever been before. He reacquired his cities and castles, but this time he didn’t resume his luxurious way of living. Instead, he became quiet and thrifty. Whenever he thought about what had happened to his three dear daughters with the wild beasts and that perhaps they had already been eaten up, he lost all zest for life.

Meanwhile, the queen couldn’t be consoled and wept more tears for her daughters than all the pearls the whale had given them. Finally, she became more calm and peaceful, and after some time she was happy again, for she gave birth to a handsome baby boy. Since God had given them the child so unexpectedly, he was named Reinald the Miracle Child. The boy grew big and strong, and the queen often told him about his three sisters, who were being held prisoners by three beasts in the magic forest. When he turned sixteen, he demanded some armor and a sword from the king, and when he received all this, he decided to embark on an adventure. So he blessed his parents and set forth.

He went straight toward the magic forest and had only one thing on his mind—to search for his sisters. At first he wandered around in the great forest for a long time without encountering a human being or a beast. But after three days he saw a young woman sitting in front of a cave and playing with a young bear cub, while another very young one was lying on her lap.

Reinald thought she must surely be his oldest sister. So he left his horse behind him and approached her.

“Dearest sister,” he said, “I’m your brother Reinald, and I’ve come to visit you.”

The princess looked at him, and since he resembled her father very strongly, she didn’t doubt his words, but she was frightened and said, “Oh, dearest brother, hurry and run away as fast as you can if you value your life. When my husband the bear comes home and finds you here, he’ll show you no mercy and will eat you up.”

But Reinald said, “I’m not afraid, and I won’t leave you until I know how you are and what things are like for you.”

When the princess saw that he was resolute, she led him into the dark cave that was like the dwelling of a bear. On one side was a heap of leaves and hay on which the old bear and his cubs slept, and on the other side was a magnificent bed with red covers trimmed with gold. That belonged to the princess. She told him to crawl under the bed and handed him something to eat. It didn’t take long before the bear came home.

“I smell, I smell the flesh of a human being,” he said and wanted to stick his hand under the bed.

But the princess cried out, “Be quiet! Who would ever come here?”

“I found a horse in the forest and ate it,” he growled, and his nose was still bloody from eating the horse. “Where there’s a horse, there’s a man, and I smell him.”

Again he wanted to look under the bed, but she gave him such a kick in the side that he did a somersault, went back to his place, put his paw in his mouth, and fell asleep.

Every seventh day the bear was restored to his natural form. He became a handsome prince; his cave, a splendid castle; the animals in the forest, his servants. It was on such a day that he had fetched the princess. Beautiful young women had come to meet her from the castle. There had been a glorious festival, and she had gone to sleep full of joy, but when she had awakened, she had found herself lying in the bear’s dark cave, and her husband had been turned into a bear growling at her feet. Only the bed and everything she had touched had remained in its natural condition and hadn’t been changed. Thus she lived six days in suffering, but on the seventh she was comforted. She didn’t grow old because only one day a week counted in her life, and she was content with her existence. She had given her husband two sons, who also became bears for six days and regained their human form on the seventh day. She stuffed their straw bed with the most delicious food all the time, including cake and fruit, and they lived off this food the entire week. Moreover, the bear obeyed her and did whatever she wanted.

When Reinald awoke, he lay in a silken bed. Servants waited on him and dressed him in the finest clothes, for his visit fell right on the seventh day. His sister entered with the two handsome princes and his brother-in-law the bear. They were glad about his arrival. Everything was magnificent and glorious, and the entire day was filled with pleasurable and joyous things. But, in the evening the princess said, “Dear brother, now it’s time for you to depart. At daybreak my husband will become a bear again, and if he finds you here tomorrow, he won’t be able to control his natural instincts and will eat you up.”

Then the bear prince came and gave him three bear hairs and said, “Whenever you’re in trouble, just rub these hairs, and I’ll come to your aid.”

Then they kissed each other and said farewell. Reinald climbed into a carriage drawn by six horses and drove off. He went over hill and valley, up and down mountains, through deserts and forests, shrubs and hedges without stopping to rest until the sky began turning grey at dusk. Then Reinald suddenly lay on the ground, and the horses and carriage disappeared. At sunrise he saw six ants galloping away, drawing a nutshell behind them.

Reinald realized he was still in the magic forest and wanted to search for his second sister. Again he wandered about aimlessly and lonely for three days without accomplishing anything. But on the fourth day he heard a big eagle come swooping down to settle in a nest. Reinald hid in the bushes and waited for the eagle to fly away. After seven hours it soared into the air again. Then Reinald emerged from the bushes, went over to the tree, and cried out, “Dearest sister, are you up above? If so, let me hear your voice. I’m Reinald, your brother, and I’ve come to visit you!”

Then he heard a voice calling down to him, “If you’re Reinald, my dearest brother, whom I’ve never seen, come up to me.”

Reinald wanted to climb the tree, but the trunk was too thick and slippery. He tried three times in vain. Suddenly a silken rope ladder dropped down, and he climbed it until he reached the eagle’s nest, which was strong and secure like a platform on a linden tree. His sister sat under a canopy made out of rose-colored silk, and an eagle’s egg was lying on her lap. She was keeping it warm in order to hatch it. They kissed each other and rejoiced, but after a while the princess said, “Now, hurry and see to it that you get out of here, dearest brother. If the eagle, my husband, sees you, he’ll hack your eyes out and devour your heart as he’s already done with three of your servants, who were looking for you in the forest.”

“No,” said Reinald. “I’m staying here until your husband is transformed.” “That will happen but only in six weeks. If you can hold out that long, go and hide in the tree. It’s hollow on the inside, and I’ll drop food down to you every day.”

Reinald crawled into the tree, and the princess let food down to him every day. Whenever the eagle flew away, he climbed up to her. After six weeks the eagle was transformed, and once more Reinald awoke in a bed that was like the one at his brother-in-law the bear’s place. Only here it was more splendid, and he lived with the eagle prince in great joy. On the seventh evening they said their farewells. The eagle gave him three eagle feathers and said, “If you’re in trouble, rub them, and I’ll come to your aid.”

Then he gave him servants to show him the way out of the forest. But when morning came, they suddenly disappeared, and Reinald was all alone on top of a high rocky cliff in a terrible wilderness. He looked around him, and in the distance he saw the reflection of a large lake, which glistened from the sun’s rays. He thought of his third sister, who might be there. So he began to climb down the cliff and work his way through the bushes and between the rocks. He needed three days to do this, and he often lost sight of the lake, but on the fourth day he succeeded in getting there. Once he was on the bank, he called out, “Dearest sister, if you’re in the water, let me hear your voice. I’m Reinald, your brother, and I’ve come to visit you.”

But no one answered, and everything was very quiet. He threw bread crumbs into the water and said to the fish, “Dear fish, go to my sister and tell her that Reinald the Wonder Child is here and wants to see her.”

But the red-speckled flounders snapped up the bread and didn’t listen to his words. Then he saw a little boat and immediately took off his armor. He kept only his sword in his hand as he jumped into the boat and rowed off. After he had gone a long way, he saw a chimney made of rock crystal jutting out of the water, and there was a pleasant smell rising up from it. Reinald rowed toward it and was convinced that his sister was living down below. So he climbed on top of the chimney and slid down. The princess was greatly startled when she suddenly saw a pair of wriggling legs followed shortly by a whole man, who identified himself as her brother. She rejoiced with all her heart, but then she turned sad and said, “The whale has heard that you’ve wanted to visit me, and he’s declared that if you come while he’s a whale, he’ll not be able to control his desire to eat you up. Moreover, he’ll break my crystal house, and I’ll also perish in the flood of water.”

“Can’t you hide me until the time comes when the magic loses its power?”

“Oh, no. How can I do that? Don’t you see that the walls are all made out of crystal, and you can see through them?”

Nevertheless, she thought and thought, and finally she remembered the room where the wood was kept. She arranged the wood in such a careful way that nobody could see anything from the outside, and it was there that she hid the Wonder Child. Soon after, the whale came, and the princess trembled like an aspen leaf. He swam around the crystal house a few times, and when he saw a little piece of Reinald’s clothing sticking out of the wood, he beat his tail, snorted ferociously, and if he had seen more, he would surely have destroyed the house. He came once a day and swam around it until the magic stopped in the seventh month. Suddenly Reinald found himself in a castle right in the middle of an island, and the castle surpassed even the splendor of the eagle’s castle. Now he lived with his sister and brother-in-law for a whole month in the lap of luxury. When the time was over, the whale gave him three scales and said, “When you’re in trouble, rub them, and I’ll come to your aid.”

The whale brought him to the bank, where his armor was still lying on the ground. The Wonder Child moved around in the wilderness for seven more days, and he slept seven nights under the open skies. Then he caught sight of a castle with a steel gate that had a mighty lock on it. In front of the gate was a black bull with flashing eyes. It was guarding the entrance, and Reinald attacked it. He gave the bull a powerful blow on its neck, but the neck was made of steel, and the sword broke as if it were glass. He tried to use his lance, but it broke like a piece of straw. Then the bull grabbed him with its horns and threw him into the air so that he got caught in the branches of a tree. In his desperation Reinald remembered the three bear’s hairs and rubbed them in his hand. All at once the bear appeared and fought with the bull. He tore the bull to pieces, but a bird came out of the bull’s stomach, flew high into the air, and rushed off. But Reinald rubbed the three eagle’s feathers, and suddenly a mighty eagle came flying through the air and pursued the bird, which flew directly toward a pond. The eagle dived at the bird and mangled it, but Reinald saw the bird drop a golden egg into the water. Now he rubbed the three fish scales in his hand, and immediately a whale came swimming up, swallowed the egg, and spat it out onto the shore. Reinald picked it up and cracked it open with a stone. There he found a little key that fit the steel gate. As soon as he just touched the gate with the key, the gate sprang open by itself, and he entered. All the bars on the other doors slid off by themselves, and he went through seven doors into seven splendid and brightly lit rooms. In the last room a maiden was lying asleep on a bed. She was so beautiful that he was completely dazzled by her. He sought to wake her, but it was in vain. Her sleep was so deep that she seemed to be dead. In his rage he struck a black slate standing next to the bed. At that very moment the maiden awoke but fell right back to sleep. Now he took the slate and threw it onto the stone floor so that it shattered into a thousand pieces. No sooner did this happen than the maiden opened her eyes wide, and the magic spell was broken. She turned out to be the sister of Reinald’s three brothers-in-law. Because she had rejected the love of a godless sorcerer, he had sentenced her to a deathlike sleep and changed her brothers into animals. They were to remain that way so long as the black slate remained untouched.

Reinald led the maiden out of the castle, and as they passed through the gate, his brothers-in-law came riding up from three different directions. They had been released from the magic spell, and with them came their wives and children. Indeed, the eagle’s bride had hatched the egg and carried a beautiful baby girl in her arms. Now all of them traveled to the old king and queen. The Miracle Child brought his three sisters home. Soon he married the beautiful maiden, and their wedding provided great joy and pleasure to everyone,

Now the cat’s run home, for my tale is done.


bookjacket

The Original Folk and Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm:
The Complete First Edition
Jacob & Wilhelm Grimm, Translated and edited by Jack Zipes
Illustrated by Andrea Dezsö

Art credit: Andrea Dezsö

The Warbler Guide App Blog Tour starts next week

The Warbler Guide App Warbler tour smallwill be live on iTunes any day now and next week we are partnering with a stellar group of bird bloggers to bring you exclusive content and opportunities to win apps and books. We’ll post links each day to get you to the right place, but here is the schedule in case you want to plan ahead:

Monday, December 15 – Birding is Fun will bring you an exclusive video showcasing one of the features of the app!

Tuesday, December 16 – Drunk Birder will give us some insight on what British birders think of our American warblers + Prairie Birder will test your warbler ID skills with a photo quiz!

Wednesday, December 17 – Warbler Watch will speak with the brains of this operation — AKA Tom Stephenson and Scott Whittle.

Thursday, December 18 – 10,000 Birds will provide an in-depth review of the app.

Friday, December 19 – ABA blog will give you an exclusive peek at one of the most exciting visual features of the app.

(note some of the dates may change, but the participants are set)

The following week, we will run a sweepstakes style giveaway for a complete The Warbler Guide set — the book, the song companion, and the app — as well as a lovely pair of Zeiss binoculars. People who have been following the tour will likely find it a bit easier to figure out our clues (though of course, we’ll have a way for everyone else to enter too).

We look forward to sharing this exciting new app with you. It is groundbreaking in several ways and we can’t wait to hear what you think.

Thank you!

Ai Weiwei exhibition at Blenheim Palace: Our UK publicity assistant investigates!

Visitors can expect to experience something different this autumn at Blenheim Palace. Tradition meets modernity as the 18th century baroque architecture of Blenheim, the birthplace of wartime British Prime Minister Sir Winston Churchill, is host to an exhibition of the artwork of Chinese artist and dissident Ai Weiwei.Ai weiwei sign

This exciting exhibition is especially relevant to Princeton University Press for two reasons: not only is Blenheim Palace a stone’s throw from Princeton University Press’s European office in Woodstock, Oxfordshire, but Princeton University Press published Ai Weiwei’s ‘Little Black Book’, Weiwei-isms, last year.

Weiwei-isms is a collection of quotes demonstrating Ai Weiwei’s thoughts on key aspects of his art, politics and life, carefully selected by Larry Warsh from articles, tweets and interviews.

“Everything is art. Everything is politics.” — Weiwei-isms

Like Weiwei-isms, the exhibition at Blenheim Palace clearly demonstrates Ai Weiwei’s commitment to art as a powerful political statement, as a means of reacting against injustice, and inspiring others to do the same.

Blenheim chandelier“I want people to see their own power.” – Weiwei-isms

This certainly becomes clear as you enter the exhibition. You are given a leaflet which serves as a guide to Ai’s artwork, dispersed throughout the rooms of the palace. Despite this, none of the artwork is signposted and it becomes the visitor’s responsibility to seek it out and take meaning and inspiration from what they see.

The collection brings together pieces created by the artist over the past 30 years. It is especially impressive given that it was curated remotely, Ai Weiwei having been under house arrest since 2011. The old and new are often brought together, with artefacts from the past being reimagined in novel ways. Take, for example, the Han Dynasty vases transformed beyond recognition by car paint or by being ‘rebranded’ with the Coca Cola logo.

Blenheim zodiacHis ‘Circle of Animals/Zodiac Heads’ (2010), previously displayed at a year-long exhibition at Princeton University, is also at Blenheim. This work is an ironic interpretation of the bronze zodiac head statues that were looted from the Emperor’s summer palace (Yuan Ming Yuan) in Beijing in 1860.

Other highlights include ‘He Xie’ (2012), a work comprised of 2,300 porcelain crabs on the floor of the Red Drawing Room (‘He Xie’, meaning ‘river crabs’, puns on the Chinese phrase for ‘harmony’).

While some pieces are the first thing you see when you walk into a room, other pieces are integrated more subtly into the sumptuous interiors of Blenheim Palace. The Wave Plate (2014) is seamlessly integrated into the lavish table decoration as the centrepiece in the Salon, and a pair of handcuffs made of Huali wood (2012) – a reminder of Ai Weiwei’s current situation – placed suggestively on the bed in Churchill’s birth room might escape your attention due to the large number of visitors moving from room to room, all engrossed in the same treasure hunt as you.

Blenheim crabsAll in all, the collaboration between Blenheim Palace and Ai Weiwei really does merit a visit. Ai Weiwei’s work is all the more interesting and thought-provoking for being situated in the context of Blenheim Palace and its grounds.

The exhibition at Blenheim Palace highlights the ‘clash’ of the old and new, which is indeed something that is key to much of Ai Weiwei’s work.

“If a nation cannot face its past, it has no future.” – Weiwei-isms

In years to come, the Ai Weiwei exhibition at Blenheim Palace is sure to become part of the artist’s legacy and a poignant reminder of his struggle for justice and truth.

“The art always wins. Anything can happen to me, but the art will stay.” – Weiwei-isms

The exhibition runs until 14th December.

“Governor Christie, Fidel Castro, and Hurricane Sandy,” a guest post by Stuart Schwartz

Hurricane Sandy on October 25, 2012 (Source: NASA, MODIS, LANCE, HDF File Data processed by Supportstorm: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Sandy_Oct_25_2012_1530Z.jpg)

In late October, 2012 superstorm Sandy swept up from the Caribbean and pounded the Northeast. The damage was horrendous: 268 dead, $68 billion in property loss, the most expensive disaster in the United States after Hurricane Katrina. The images of President Obama and Republican Governor Christie walking the beaches of New Jersey became an icon of collaboration at a time when the country was frustrated by Washington’s seeming deadlock. Obama was swept into office the following month, and Christie’s popularity soared in the aftermath. Sandy was not the only reason for these political results, but exit polls confirmed that it was certainly a factor. It was a demonstration that government can effectively provide help in a time of crisis when those in authority do not hold government in contempt, to paraphrase Paul Krugman. It was a message that resonated with large segments of the public.

Governor Christie gives a no-nonsense update on the state of things, post Hurricane Sandy. Credit:  Alec Perkins. Source:  https://www.flickr.com/photos/alecperkins/8155687190/

Governor Christie gives a no-nonsense update on the state of things, post Hurricane Sandy.
Credit: Alec Perkins. Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/alecperkins/8155687190/

But Hurricane Sandy had come in the midst of a scientific and political controversies about the effects of climate change on the intensity and frequency of cyclonic storms, and about the nature or role of government in protecting citizens from calamities. The response to Hurricane Sandy revealed the complex and sometimes contradictory responses to these debates. Governor Christie’s post-Sandy pleading for Federal aid moved some fellow Republicans to criticize him for “big government” solutions and excessive dependence on Washington, but before Sandy and thereafter on the question of global warming like many of his Republican colleagues he had voiced his own doubts on climate change, and emphasized that he had more immediate problems to solve than to debate such arcane issues. That seemingly “practical” approach contributed to his reelection, and in October of last year in his victory speech, the governor spoke of “the spirit of Sandy,” the sense of community and cooperation in problem solving that could become the way he would meet many kinds of political and social challenges.

Unknowingly, Governor Christie was repeating the arguments of Fidel Castro in a similar situation following the disastrous Hurricane Flora of 1963. Flora, the second deadliest storm in the history of the Atlantic had killed about 8,000 people in Haiti and Cuba. Castro at the time, embarrassed by the Missile crisis mobilized all of the institutions of Cuba in the relief effort. Cuba suffered over 1,200 death which was bad enough, but given the dimension of the storm, the government effort was a tremendous success. The successful cooperation and mobilization of society convinced him that this spirit of Flora could become the attitude in which all the country’s problems were met. Castro’s actions after Flora were used to justify the effectiveness of the Revolution and, in fact, Cuba subsequently became a model for disaster mitigation and preparation, but whatever the immediate political benefits, overtime Castro’s speeches also became “greener,”and like many leaders in the Caribbean, he began to emphasize the need to take global warming and the rise of the oceans seriously.

For the most part, that has not been the case in New Jersey. The problem is that separation of practical issues from long-term issues like global warming is short-sighted. In Sandy, for example, the New Jersey Transit Corporation, basing its decision on past experience failed to move its rolling stock to high ground and as a result suffered a loss of a quarter of its trains and $150 million in damages. New York’s MTA under Governor Cuomo suffered far less because he had taken climate change as a reality and had taken necessary precautions. Both governors had been handicapped, however, by the fact that FEMA funding had been so reduced prior to Sandy that the shoreline maps of areas of possible flooding of New York and New Jersey were decades out of date.

Castro’s experience following hurricane Flora made him an advocate of strong government action in response to natural disasters, but it had also made him responsive to the challenges of environmental change. It remains unclear if Governor Christie who is looking forward to 2016 has learned a similar lesson, and more importantly, if he could make that message appealing to his political party, the leadership of which continues to deny scientific evidence of human caused climate change, or suggests that even if it does exist, there is little that can be done about it. That position combined with a neo-liberal argument for weakening financial support for the public sector, lowering investments in infrastructure, and the dismantling of central authority that has gained much support since the 1980s, and it raises the question for Governor Christie and the rest of us if the “spirit of Sandy” that he so passionately invoked will be enough to confront the challenges of climate change.


Stuart B. Schwartz is the George Burton Adams Professor of History and chair of the Council on Latin American and Iberian Studies at Yale University. His many books include All Can Be Saved: Religious Tolerance and Salvation in the Iberian Atlantic World and Sea of Storms. A History of Caribbean Hurricanes from Columbus to Katrina (forthcoming January 2015).

Wrapping up #UPWeek — Follow Friday

What a week it has been. Wrapping up the university press blog tour are six movers and shakers. These university presses take to their blogs to discuss fields, authors, and research that is on the cutting edge. Check out these posts for insight into what university presses are adding to scholarly and popular discussions right now.

upress week 2

University of Illinois Press — University of Illinois Press discusses the emerging topics and authors in their Geopolitics of Information series.

University of Minnesota Press — John Hartigan, a participant in the University of Minnesota Press’s new Forerunners series, explains the ways in which he uses social media to enhance scholarly connections and establish social-media conversations with regard to his research.

University of Nebraska Press — How should university pressess be adding to the conversation on social media and who is doing it right? University of Nebraska Press’s marketing department takes a look at the potential for social media use in scholarly publishing.

NYU Press — The folks at NYU Press blog about the forthcoming website for the book Keywords for American Cultural Studies (Second Edition).

Island Press — Island Press takes a look at what is on their editors’ radar these days and why those scholars and fields are important.

Columbia University Press — Every Friday, the Columbia University Press blog runs a post called the University Press Roundup in which they highlight posts from around the academic publishing blogosphere. This blog tour post explains how and why they have made a commitment to a blog series that rarely features their own titles. They discuss how university press blogs generate publicity for individual titles but also provide a much-needed environment where scholarship can be presented for a general readership.

Looking back — a #TBT for #UPWeek

Upress week

 

This afternoon, we head back in time for University Press Week’s Throwback Thursday. Check out these six posts for a look back at the history, recent and not so recent, of university presses.

Temple University Press — The folks at Temple University discuss the development of their influential Asian History and Culture series.

Wesleyan University Press — Learn more about the great Wesleyan Poetry Series with this group of #tbt posts.

Harvard University Press — Late last year, Harvard University Press made roughly 3,000 previously unavailable backlist works available again. These titles go back as far as the late 1800s. (How cool!) While prepping the data, we kept a running list of titles that were really showing their age. This post will give you a few laughs as you are asked to name “Backlist Title from Harvard University Press - OR – Song by Theatrically Erudite Indie Band The Decemberists?”

University of Washington Press — Check out the “then and now” cover designs of these recently reissued Asian American classics.

University of Toronto Press — University of Toronto Press will be looking back at the publications of The Champlain Society, an historical society which publishes primary source archive material that explores Canada’s history. Their post highlights this year’s volume, as well as historical images from past publications.

MIT Press — Up at MIT, they take a look back at former press designer Muriel Cooper. She designed MIT Press’s iconic colophon 50 years ago in 1964.

Tim Chartier and the Mega Menger

math bytesHow many business cards are needed to complete a level 3 Menger Sponge? What is a level 3 Menger Sponge? Tim Chartier, author of Math Bytes: Google Bombs, Chocolate Covered Pi, and Other Cool Bits in Computing, explains.

In a Huffington Post article, A Million Business Cards Presents a Math Challenge, Chartier asks readers to go in their wallet and check for  business cards. If there aren’t any, “they may be part of a worldwide math challenge. Over the past month, people around the world have been building a mathematical structure out of more than a million business cards.” That mathematical structure is a Mega Menger, but before we get there, let’s discuss what a level 1 Menger Sponge is.

A level 1 Menger Sponge is a fractal consisting of twenty cubes. Each cube is made up of 6 business cards, so a level 1 Menger needs 120 business cards. A level 2 Menger is created using 20 level 1 Mengers, a level 3 Menger is made with 20 level 2 Mengers, so on and so on.

Here at the Press, we don’t have a million business cards to complete a Mega Menger, but we do have a lot of books. Using Chartier’s code (which you can play with here: http://lifeislinear.davidson.edu/sierpinski.html), we were able to create 2-D versions of a Menger Sponge called a Sierpinski Carpet using our jacket images. Below, see if you can figure out which books are featured in the fractal images below! Click the images to see the related title.

1.
zombies

2.
penguins

3.
amazons

4.
weeden

5.
copy

#UPWeek: Press Director Peter Dougherty participating in Collaboration in Scholarly Publishing today at 1 PM EST

Join the Association of American University Presses today, November 12, 2014, from 1pm-2pm ET, in celebrating scholarly presses by highlighting three exemplary collaborative projects in an online panel moderated by Jennifer Howard from The Chronicle of Higher Education.

The session will be presented on Google+: http://bit.ly/ZUCKr1

Ms. Howard will be joined by Barbara Kline Pope, Executive Director for Communications at National Academies Press and AAUP President, Peter Dougherty, Director of Princeton University Press, and Ron Chrisman, Director of the University of North Texas Press to discuss the projects they spearheaded for their respective presses. These three projects illustrate some of the best work being produced in publishing today and open the door to talk about other collaborations within science and the humanities.

  • Princeton University Press and Caltech’s Einstein Papers Project provides the first complete picture of Albert Einstein’s massive written legacy.
  • National Academies Press’s Academy Scope is a visualization of all of the reports that are available on NAP.edu, allowing readers to browse through the reports of the National Academies by topic area and seeing relationships between titles.
  • University of North Texas Press, University of North Texas Sub-Antarctic Biocultural Conservation Program, and University of Magallanes in Chile’s Magellanic Sub-Antarctic Ornithology project is the result of a decade of research conducted by scientists associated with the Omora Ethnobotanical Park in the Cape Horn Biosphere Reserve in Chile.

 

November 12, 2014, 1pm-2pm ET

Collaboration in Scholarly Publishing

Presented on Google+

http://bit.ly/ZUCKr1

#UPWeek

#UPWeek Princeton at the movies

BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH stars in THE IMITATION GAME Photo: Jack English © 2014 The Weinstein Company. All rights reserved.

BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH stars in THE IMITATION GAME
Photo: Jack English © 2014 The Weinstein Company. All rights reserved.

Lights, camera, action!

Much as A Beautiful Mind introduced millions of readers to the singular genius of John Nash as portrayed by Russell Crowe in an Oscar-winning performance, The Imitation Game—starring Benedict Cumberbatch, Keira Knightley,Matthew Goode, Allen Leech, Charles Dance, among others, and arriving in theaters November 28—casts a spotlight on the accomplishments and contributions of Enigma code-breaker Alan Turing (1912–1954).

The movie draws inspiration from Andrew Hodges’s award-winning biography Alan Turing: The Enigma, which was originally published in 1983. Princeton University Press has released an updated, paperback movie edition complete with new material from the author that brings the story of Turing’s life current through the 2013 royal pardon of his conviction for homosexual activity. Movie-goers will no doubt be eager to learn more about Turing, an unlikely hero credited with turning the tide of World War II by cracking the German Enigma code, and Alan Turing: The Enigma offers the most authoritative and readable account of his life and work.

In celebration of #UPWeek, Princeton University Press sat down with mathematics editor, Vickie Kearn, to go behind the scenes of making a celebrated book into a major motion picture.

The Book

Alan Turing: The Enigma: The Book That Inspired the Film The Imitation Game
By Andrew Hodges

It is only a slight exaggeration to say that the British mathematician Alan Turing (1912-1954) saved the Allies from the Nazis, invented the computer and artificial intelligence, and anticipated gay liberation by decades–all before his suicide at age forty-one. This acclaimed biography of the founder of computer science, with a new preface by the author that addresses Turing’s royal pardon in 2013, is the definitive account of an extraordinary mind and life.

Capturing both the inner and outer drama of Turing’s life, Andrew Hodges tells how Turing’s revolutionary idea of 1936–the concept of a universal machine–laid the foundation for the modern computer and how Turing brought the idea to practical realization in 1945 with his electronic design. The book also tells how this work was directly related to Turing’s leading role in breaking the German Enigma ciphers during World War II, a scientific triumph that was critical to Allied victory in the Atlantic. At the same time, this is the tragic account of a man who, despite his wartime service, was eventually arrested, stripped of his security clearance, and forced to undergo a humiliating treatment program–all for trying to live honestly in a society that defined homosexuality as a crime.

Alan Turing: The Enigma is a gripping story of mathematics, computers, cryptography, and homosexual persecution.

Movie tie-in cover for Alan Turing: The Enigma

Movie tie-in cover for Alan Turing: The Enigma

Q&A with Mathematics Editor, Vickie Kearn

PUP: Tell us about when you first heard that a film based on Alan Turing: The Enigma would be produced. Were you excited? Nervous?

VK: This is a rather interesting story. In the fall of 2011, while planning for the  Princeton University 2012 Turing Centennial Celebration, Bob Sedgewick, a professor at Princeton, contacted me about publishing a book on Alan Turing’s work, including his thesis which he wrote for his PhD at Princeton University. During this time he mentioned that there was a fantastic biography of Alan Turing written by Andrew Hodges and that the book was out of print in the US and had been for some time.

I contacted Andrew and found that I already knew his agent so I contacted him to make sure the US rights for the book were still available. The agent told me that they were and that plans were underway for a revival of the play Breaking the Code by Hugh Whitmore, which was based on the Hodges book. He also told me that a centennial edition of the book was planned by Vintage, who holds the UK rights. This all sounded very exciting, and with the forthcoming centennial events, the timing was perfect.

Just one month later the agent told me that the movie rights had been picked up by Warner Brothers and that the details of the casting, director, etc. should be known by late January of 2012. Princeton University Press worked jointly with Vintage to have the centenary edition of Alan Turing: The Enigma published in time for the centennial Turing events in May 2012, and I had little time to think too much about the movie. Time passed and the movie deal fell apart.

In the late summer of 2013, we learned that a new movie deal was struck and that Benedict Cumberbatch would be the lead actor. This was fantastic news, but I stayed rather calm because I knew by now that these things do fall apart. However, in late September I found out that Black Bear Pictures was the studio and that the movie was in pre-production. In April, we moved into high gear and began serious work on what would be in the movie edition of the book.

PUP: You worked directly with The Imitation Game’s film company and author Andrew Hodges during the making of the movie. What was your role, as editor of Alan Turing: The Enigma?

VK: I have worked with Andrew since 2011 and was very excited that we would be working on a new edition of his book and that we also would be collaborating again with Vintage in the UK. Because we decided to reset the book to improve the legibility, he had to proofread it again. That is a huge effort for a 750 page book. Everyone at the Weinstein Company has been fantastic. They respond quickly and have supported the publication of the book as much as we have supported the film. It has been a very exciting process.  As editor, it is my job to make certain that all the pieces come together at the right time. In publishing, there are many steps to make sure your book is a success. They include the review, editing, design, printing, and binding phases and then we begin the marketing, publicity, and sales events. Everything has to happen at a particular time to make the best use of the efforts of everyone at the press. We need a book cover for ads and that has to be approved by the movie company. I have learned that is a very complicated process. Each of the movie companies decides what will be on the cover. For example, the cover of our book and that for the Vintage edition are different.

Alan Turing plaque on Castro Street in San Francisco

Alan Turing plaque on Castro Street in San Francisco

PUP: What was your favorite part about that interaction?

VK: The PUP publicist of the book, Jessica Pellien, and I have worked so far with about a dozen different people at Vintage and the Weinstein Company. You might think this is a bit chaotic, but it isn’t. It does take a bit of choreography, but it is working well. I think that my favorite part about this whole process is seeing the work of dozens of people come together and then holding the first copy of the book in my hand.

PUP: What do you, as the editor of Andrew Hodges’ book, hope that viewers take away from the film?

VK: I hope that they will realize what a huge contribution Alan Turing made to ending WWII and to the development of computer science. I hope that when someone says, “Can you name a computer scientist?” that they will say Alan Turing as quickly as they might say Albert Einstein when asked to name a physicist. I hope that people will understand that human relationships and love between people does not have to be heterosexual. I hope that people who see the film will also read the book.

PUP: When it comes to movies based on books, do you like to read the book before or after you see the movie?

VK: I always prefer to read the book first. I hope that people who see the film will also read the book. They are two different experiences and both are incredibly enjoyable.

Watch the trailer for the The Imitation Game below. Get that edge over fellow movie-goers and check out Chapter One of Alan Turing: The Enigma here.

 

For more examples of university presses in pop culture, take a look at the posts below:

University of Wisconsin Press

University Press of Mississippi

Georgetown University Press

University Press of Kentucky

Penn Press