Princeton Cooks… Beef Ragoût

We invited our Princeton colleagues to try their hand at cooking and baking the delicious treats found in Cooking for Crowds: 40th Anniversary Edition by Merry “Corky” White. Here, Deborah Grondahl, Digital Publications Assistant at Princeton University Press, takes on a Beef Ragoût recipe, swapping out flour for a gluten-free friendly alternative. Recipe is below.  Bon Appetit!


 

Beef Ragoût

Deborah Grondahl

in bowls

After reading through the cookbook, Cooking for Crowds–this is the recipe that said “Cook Me”. Maybe it was the peppercorns, maybe it was the orange zest but I needed to make this recipe.  One problem—the recipe calls for flour. I have a gluten-free kitchen. What do I do?  After reading and re-reading the recipe, the flour is used to coat the meat, so substituting with a different type of flour is easy.  I used an all-purpose mix that has potato, garbanzo, tapioca and sorghum flours, but I’m sure you could easily use potato or corn starch.  I went with the all-purpose mix because I thought the bean flavor might lend itself to the complex flavors of the dish.

Making this seems straight forward enough—Prep, Sear, Simmer, Eat. The recipe scales easily to accommodate the crowd you are serving.  Two, is not a crowd, but I like to make extra for lunch the next day or another diner and the recipe does say its better the next day.

Prep:

I love using fresh herbs, but often don’t have them on hand. I had planned to make this so I had the thyme. Finely chopped

thyme

Half-moons of Onions—sounds so fancy

Orange zest.  This is what drew me to this recipe, strips of orange zest.

orange peel

Sear:

onions in pot

Okay, so this isn’t a picture of the meat being seared.  It’s the after picture with those fancy half-moons of onions.

Simmer:

in pot

A pot of promise.  The recipe says you can use either beef stock or red wine or both. I used stock, because I didn’t have wine. After you put everything in the pot, the recipe says to cover with additional liquid (not mentioned in the ingredients). Luckily I had additional stock on hand and there was no issue.

Eat:

Sserved over rice:

in bowls

 


 

Beef Ragoût

After watching me try several recipes for beef stew, my daughter developed this one, which is especially good because of the added orange peel. Use only the orange part: do not use white of peel as it is very bitter when cooked.

  6 12 20 50
butter 2 tbs 4 tbs 7 tbs 1 c
cooking oil 1 tbs 2 tbs 3 tbs 8 tbs
stewing beef, preferably chuck,cut into ½ -inch chunks 1½ lbs 3 lbs 6 lbs 12 lbs
medium onions, sliced 2 4 7 16
all-purpose flour 2 tbs 4 tbs 7 tbs 1 c
dry, red wine 1 c 2 c 3½ c 7 c
or        
beef stock 1 c 2 c 3½ c 7 c
carrots, peeled and roughly chopped 2 4 7 16
garlic cloves, finely chopped 1 2 4 7
fresh thyme, finely chopped 1 tsp 2 tsp 1 tbs 1½ tbs
or        
dried thyme ½ tsp 1 tsp 1½ tsp 2 tsp
bay leaves 1 2 4 8
tomato paste 1 tbs 2 tbs 3½ tbs 1½6-oz cans
2-inch, thin strips of orange peel 2 4 7 12
peppercorns 6 12 20 40
salt 1 tsp 2 tsp 3½ tsp 2 tbs

Melt the butter and oil together in a large, heavy saucepan. Have a large casserole at hand.

Over medium heat brown the meat, several pieces at a time, and as they are browned, remove them to the casserole. Add the onions to the pan and cook until soft over a medium flame.

Add the flour to the beef and toss to cover well, add the browned onions to the beef. Add the wine or stock, and bring to a simmer, stirring. Then add the carrots and the remaining ingredients. Add extra stock, wine, or water to cover all the ingredients.

Reduce the heat to very low, cover, and simmer for about 2 hours, or until the meat is soft to the touch or the fork. Do not let it cook too much or the meat will disintegrate. And watch the liquid, so that it doesn’t boil away. Let the ragoût cool to room temperature, then refrigerate.

Reheat slowly and serve with whipped potatoes, boiled noodles, or rice. Or just crusty French bread and salad.

NOTE: This is 100 percent better the next day, so be sure to make it ahead.


This recipe is taken from:

bookjacket
<align=”center”>

Cooking for Crowds
40th Anniversary Edition
Merry White
With a new foreword by Darra Goldstein and a new introduction by the author

“[Merry White's] book, made up of recipes she collected as the caterer for the Harvard Center for European Studies, suggested a new way of entertaining, with self-serve spanakopita, petite shrimp quiche and that savior of the anxious cook, the casserole that can be made a day ahead. Edward Koren’s woolly illustrations set the tone: vegetables are our friends, and food tastes best in groups. Even though pesto and vindaloo are no longer exotic, during the holidays her attitude (and her meatballs) may be what every stressed-out host needs.”–Alexandra Lange, New York Times

Tasty Tuesday: What’s Cookin’ With Princeton University Press

Cooked Books:

Dish - Cooked Books: Recipes from the Staff  of Princeton University Press
Recipes from the Staff of Princeton University Press

includes eighty-two recipes contributed by current and former members of the Princeton University Press staff. In 115 pages, it draws on the best culinary inspiration of our extended publishing community, their families, and their friends.

We marry the cultures of cooking and publishing a level deeper by tying the names of many of our favorite dishes to titles of our favorite books and, in some cases, names from the Press’s glorious past. And so we have “The Barrington Atlas of of Greek and Roman Chicken,” the “Copywriters’ Crutch Casserole,” and “Scribner’s Scrumptious Stuffed-Shell Tacos,” to go along with many other distinctive PUP offerings. While the Press-specific epithets may be mysterious to some readers, we trust the quality of the recipes and the liveliness of their presentation will compensate for any confusion.

Spoon - Cooked Books: Recipes from the Staff of Princeton University PressSpoon - Cooked Books: Recipes from the Staff of Princeton University PressSpoon - Cooked Books: Recipes from the Staff of Princeton University Press

Each Tuesday, PUP wants to share a recipe from our book for our blog readers to try. Tasty Tuesday is somewhat of a departure from our everyday content. We believe that cooking and cookbooks are a legitimate part of scholarly activity. Scholars like to eat, and many do not eat well enough. “Mens sana in corpore sano,” we always say. We hope the recipes in this book will nourish thought.

TODAY’S TASTY TUESDAY RECIPE:

Mandel BrotPlate - Cooked Books: Recipes from the Staff of Princeton University Press
by Adam Fortgang

  • 3 eggs
  • 3⁄4 cup oil
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 2 cups flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • chopped walnuts and raisins—to taste;
  • try a handful of each grease for cookie sheets

Preheat oven to 350 degrees (F).

Mix eggs, sugar, oil, and flour thoroughly. Add chopped walnuts and raisins. Pour onto greased cookie   sheet and bake until light brown—approximately 25 minutes. Remove from oven, loosen. Make 3 strips,  about 3 x 12-inch apiece; slicing carefully. Return to oven for another 10 minutes, till brown.

The Illustrations
The images of food, tableware, and cooking implements that figure prominently in this book are from Menu Designs, published by The Pepin Press, Agile Rabbit Editions, © 1999 and 2005 Pepin Van Roojen, www.pepinpress.com. These images are used with permission. Other incidental images of books and animals are taken from two Dover Electronic Clip Art Publications, Books, Reading and Writing Illustrations (CD-Rom and book © 1992) and 1565 Spot Illustrations and Motifs (CD-Rom and book © 2007) and are used in compliance with terms of use for materials from Dover Publications, Inc.

Tasty Tuesday: What’s Cookin’ With Princeton University Press

Cooked Books:

Dish - Cooked Books: Recipes from the Staff  of Princeton University Press
Recipes from the Staff of Princeton University Press

includes eighty-two recipes contributed by current and former members of the Princeton University Press staff. In 115 pages, it draws on the best culinary inspiration of our extended publishing community, their families, and their friends.

We marry the cultures of cooking and publishing a level deeper by tying the names of many of our favorite dishes to titles of our favorite books and, in some cases, names from the Press’s glorious past. And so we have “The Barrington Atlas of of Greek and Roman Chicken,” the “Copywriters’ Crutch Casserole,” and “Scribner’s Scrumptious Stuffed-Shell Tacos,” to go along with many other distinctive PUP offerings. While the Press-specific epithets may be mysterious to some readers, we trust the quality of the recipes and the liveliness of their presentation will compensate for any confusion.

Spoon - Cooked Books: Recipes from the Staff of Princeton University PressSpoon - Cooked Books: Recipes from the Staff of Princeton University PressSpoon - Cooked Books: Recipes from the Staff of Princeton University Press

Each Tuesday, PUP wants to share a recipe from our book for our blog readers to try. Tasty Tuesday is somewhat of a departure from our everyday content. We believe that cooking and cookbooks are a legitimate part of scholarly activity. Scholars like to eat, and many do not eat well enough. “Mens sana in corpore sano,” we always say. We hope the recipes in this book will nourish thought.

TODAY’S TASTY TUESDAY RECIPE:

Not for Resale Sunshine Kabobs Galleys
by Jessica Pellien
Plate - Cooked Books: Recipes from the Staff of Princeton University Press
Kabobs

  • 1 pound large shrimp (approx. 20 pieces), shelled
  • 2–3 yellow squash, chopped into large chunks
  • 1 large Vidalia onion, cut into sixths
  • 1⁄2 fresh pineapple, chopped into large chunks

Marinade

  • 3 tablespoons fish sauce
  • 1⁄4 cup lime juice
  • 1⁄4 cup honey
  • 11⁄2 tablespoons fresh ginger, grated a pinch red pepper flakes
  • salt and pepper to taste

Whisk all ingredients for the marinade together and pour over shrimp in a bowl. Cover bowl with plastic wrap and refrigerate for 30–45 minutes. Assemble kebobs with even distribution of shrimp, squash, onion, and pineapple. Grill for 15 minutes, turning frequently and basting with remaining marinade.

Serve over rice.

The Illustrations
The images of food, tableware, and cooking implements that figure prominently in this book are from Menu Designs, published by The Pepin Press, Agile Rabbit Editions, © 1999 and 2005 Pepin Van Roojen, www.pepinpress.com. These images are used with permission. Other incidental images of books and animals are taken from two Dover Electronic Clip Art Publications, Books, Reading and Writing Illustrations (CD-Rom and book © 1992) and 1565 Spot Illustrations and Motifs (CD-Rom and book © 2007) and are used in compliance with terms of use for materials from Dover Publications, Inc.

Tasty Tuesday: What’s Cookin’ With Princeton University Press

Cooked Books:

Dish - Cooked Books: Recipes from the Staff  of Princeton University Press
Recipes from the Staff of Princeton University Press

includes eighty-two recipes contributed by current and former members of the Princeton University Press staff. In 115 pages, it draws on the best culinary inspiration of our extended publishing community, their families, and their friends.

We marry the cultures of cooking and publishing a level deeper by tying the names of many of our favorite dishes to titles of our favorite books and, in some cases, names from the Press’s glorious past. And so we have “The Barrington Atlas of of Greek and Roman Chicken,” the “Copywriters’ Crutch Casserole,” and “Scribner’s Scrumptious Stuffed-Shell Tacos,” to go along with many other distinctive PUP offerings. While the Press-specific epithets may be mysterious to some readers, we trust the quality of the recipes and the liveliness of their presentation will compensate for any confusion.

Spoon - Cooked Books: Recipes from the Staff of Princeton University PressSpoon - Cooked Books: Recipes from the Staff of Princeton University PressSpoon - Cooked Books: Recipes from the Staff of Princeton University Press

Each Tuesday, PUP wants to share a recipe from our book for our blog readers to try. Tasty Tuesday is somewhat of a departure from our everyday content. We believe that cooking and cookbooks are a legitimate part of scholarly activity. Scholars like to eat, and many do not eat well enough. “Mens sana in corpore sano,” we always say. We hope the recipes in this book will nourish thought.

TODAY’S TASTY TUESDAY RECIPE:

Recent Hits on Creamy Pumpkin Soup
by Andrew DeSio
Plate - Cooked Books: Recipes from the Staff of Princeton University Press

  • 4 tablespoons butter
  • 1 cup chopped onion
  • 1 clove garlic, crushed
  • 1 teaspoon curry powder
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ¼ teaspoon ground coriander
  • a pinch red pepper flakes
  • 3 cups chicken or vegetable broth
  • 1 16-ounce can pumpkin purée
  • 1 cup half-and-half

Melt butter in a large saucepan over medium-high heat. Sauté onion and garlic in hot butter, stirring continually, until tender—about 2 minutes. Add curry, salt, coriander, and red pepper flakes to onion mixture; mix well. Cook, stirring frequently, for 1 minute. Stir broth into onion mixture. Bring to a boil over medium heat. Cook, stirring frequently, until thickened, 10–15 minutes. Add pumpkin and half-and-half to broth mixture and mix well. Cook for 5 minutes. Pour soup into a blender. Process until creamy.

Serve warm, or reheat to desired temperature. Ladle into soup bowls. Top with green onion curls, if desired.

Preparation time: 12 minutes; cooking time: 23 minutes.

Serves 4–6.

The Illustrations
The images of food, tableware, and cooking implements that figure prominently in this book are from Menu Designs, published by The Pepin Press, Agile Rabbit Editions, © 1999 and 2005 Pepin Van Roojen, www.pepinpress.com. These images are used with permission. Other incidental images of books and animals are taken from two Dover Electronic Clip Art Publications, Books, Reading and Writing Illustrations (CD-Rom and book © 1992) and 1565 Spot Illustrations and Motifs (CD-Rom and book © 2007) and are used in compliance with terms of use for materials from Dover Publications, Inc.

Tasty Tuesday: What’s Cookin’ With Princeton University Press

Cooked Books:

Dish - Cooked Books: Recipes from the Staff  of Princeton University Press
Recipes from the Staff of Princeton University Press

includes eighty-two recipes contributed by current and former members of the Princeton University Press staff. In 115 pages, it draws on the best culinary inspiration of our extended publishing community, their families, and their friends.

We marry the cultures of cooking and publishing a level deeper by tying the names of many of our favorite dishes to titles of our favorite books and, in some cases, names from the Press’s glorious past. And so we have “The Barrington Atlas of of Greek and Roman Chicken,” the “Copywriters’ Crutch Casserole,” and “Scribner’s Scrumptious Stuffed-Shell Tacos,” to go along with many other distinctive PUP offerings. While the Press-specific epithets may be mysterious to some readers, we trust the quality of the recipes and the liveliness of their presentation will compensate for any confusion.

Spoon - Cooked Books: Recipes from the Staff of Princeton University PressSpoon - Cooked Books: Recipes from the Staff of Princeton University PressSpoon - Cooked Books: Recipes from the Staff of Princeton University Press

Each Tuesday, PUP wants to share a recipe from our book for our blog readers to try. Tasty Tuesday is somewhat of a departure from our everyday content. We believe that cooking and cookbooks are a legitimate part of scholarly activity. Scholars like to eat, and many do not eat well enough. “Mens sana in corpore sano,” we always say. We hope the recipes in this book will nourish thought.

TODAY’S TASTY TUESDAY RECIPE:

The Barrington Atlas of the Greek and Roman Chicken
by Margret Aldrich

Your dinner guests won’t need a map to find their way to the table when they smell this delicious dish cooking! For best results, use Bell & Evans chicken, Muir Glen tomatoes, and wine that is good enough to drink with the meal. If you’d like to serve more people, you can increase the number of chicken pieces up to 6, as long as they fit in your pan. Feel free to use skinless chicken thighs (with bones) if you prefer dark meat, or use a combination of breasts and thighs. This is based on a recipe from Giada De Laurentiis’s program Everyday Italian.

    Plate - Cooked Books: Recipes from the Staff of Princeton University Press
  • 4 skinless chicken breast halves, with bones salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 1⁄4 cup olive oil
  • 3 ounces prosciutto, chopped
  • 2 bell peppers (preferably 1 yellow and 1 red), sliced lengthwise
  • 2 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 1⁄2 cup white wine
  • 1 15-ounce can diced tomatoes
  • 1 tablespoon fresh thyme
  • 1⁄3 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1⁄2 cup chicken stock
  • 1⁄4 cup fresh flat-leaf parsley, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons capers (or substitute 1⁄4 cup pitted kalamata olives, roughly chopped)

Season the chicken on both sides with salt and pepper. Heat the olive oil over medium heat in a large skillet (note that you will need a lid for it later). Add the chicken to the pan and brown it on both sides. Remove the chicken to a plate; set aside.

Add the prosciutto  and peppers  to the original pan and cook over medium heat for
5 minutes. Add the garlic and cook for 1 minute.  Add the wine, tomatoes,  thyme, and oregano, and use a wooden spoon to scrape the browned bits off the bottom of the pan.

Return  the chicken and any accumulated  juices to the pan, add the stock, and bring it to a boil. Cover with the lid, reduce the heat, and simmer  for 20–30 minutes, until the chicken is done. Taste and add a bit more salt and pepper, if desired. Stir in the parsley and capers (or olives) and serve.

Serves 4.

The Illustrations
The images of food, tableware, and cooking implements that figure prominently in this book are from Menu Designs, published by The Pepin Press, Agile Rabbit Editions, © 1999 and 2005 Pepin Van Roojen, www.pepinpress.com. These images are used with permission. Other incidental images of books and animals are taken from two Dover Electronic Clip Art Publications, Books, Reading and Writing Illustrations (CD-Rom and book © 1992) and 1565 Spot Illustrations and Motifs (CD-Rom and book © 2007) and are used in compliance with terms of use for materials from Dover Publications, Inc.

Tasty Tuesday: What’s Cookin’ With Princeton University Press

Cooked Books:

Dish - Cooked Books: Recipes from the Staff  of Princeton University Press
Recipes from the Staff of Princeton University Press

includes eighty-two recipes contributed by current and former members of the Princeton University Press staff. In 115 pages, it draws on the best culinary inspiration of our extended publishing community, their families, and their friends.

We marry the cultures of cooking and publishing a level deeper by tying the names of many of our favorite dishes to titles of our favorite books and, in some cases, names from the Press’s glorious past. And so we have “The Barrington Atlas of of Greek and Roman Chicken,” the “Copywriters’ Crutch Casserole,” and “Scribner’s Scrumptious Stuffed-Shell Tacos,” to go along with many other distinctive PUP offerings. While the Press-specific epithets may be mysterious to some readers, we trust the quality of the recipes and the liveliness of their presentation will compensate for any confusion.

Spoon - Cooked Books: Recipes from the Staff of Princeton University PressSpoon - Cooked Books: Recipes from the Staff of Princeton University PressSpoon - Cooked Books: Recipes from the Staff of Princeton University Press

Each Tuesday, PUP wants to share a recipe from our book for our blog readers to try. Tasty Tuesday is somewhat of a departure from our everyday content. We believe that cooking and cookbooks are a legitimate part of scholarly activity. Scholars like to eat, and many do not eat well enough. “Mens sana in corpore sano,” we always say. We hope the recipes in this book will nourish thought.

TODAY’S TASTY TUESDAY RECIPE:
Rethinking Caponata Platter

From Classical Antiquity to Foucalt by Charles and Clara Platter

  • 1 red bell pepper, slicedPlate - Cooked Books: Recipes from the Staff of Princeton University Press
  • 1 large or 2 small eggplants (peeled, if you prefer)
  • ½–¾ cup olive oil
  • 6 cloves garlic (or to taste)
  • ¼ cup tomato paste salt
  • 1 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes grated Parmesan cheese
  • ½ cup chopped parsley
  • 1 teaspoon salt (or to taste)

Preheat oven to 375 degrees (F).

Cut eggplant into 1–1½ inch cubes. Put ½ cup olive oil into a greased baking pan with at least 2” sides. Dice garlic; place garlic and eggplant into baking pan.  Mix, to get everything covered with olive oil. Cover pan; use foil or something not flammable!

Place eggplant-garlic mixture in oven, remixing with a sturdy metal spoon after 15 minutes to make sure stuff is not sticking to the bottom of the pan.  Add more olive oil if necessary: the eggplant will suck up olive oil like crazy at first, but then—as it softens— the oil will return to the pan. So make sure the pan has enough  oil to avoid sticking—but be judicious, so you don’t end up with too much oil at the end.

After eggplant mixture has begun to soften (30 minutes or so) and the oil has begun to free up, add a ¼ cup tomato paste and stir the mixture thoroughly so paste is evenly distributed. Add 1 teaspoon  salt; however, if you decide to garnish  the dish with grated Parmesan, cut back on the salt.  Add 1 teaspoon crushed  red pepper  flakes. Continue  roasting  another  20 minutes or so, or until the eggplant is easily mashed  with a fork.  Check for spiciness  and re-season as necessary.

Add parsley; then add ½ cup grated Parmesan, if you’re making a dip. If you want to use as a crostini spread, sprinkle the cheese on top before throwing the mixture under the broiler to brown.

The dish is good to go at this point—hot, cold, or at room temperature. Serves enough to take to parties. Never any leftovers.

The Illustrations
The images of food, tableware, and cooking implements that figure prominently in this book are from Menu Designs, published by The Pepin Press, Agile Rabbit Editions, © 1999 and 2005 Pepin Van Roojen, www.pepinpress.com. These images are used with permission. Other incidental images of books and animals are taken from two Dover Electronic Clip Art Publications, Books, Reading and Writing Illustrations (CD-Rom and book © 1992) and 1565 Spot Illustrations and Motifs (CD-Rom and book © 2007) and are used in compliance with terms of use for materials from Dover Publications, Inc.

Tasty Tuesday: What’s Cookin’ With Princeton University Press

Cooked Books:

Dish - Cooked Books: Recipes from the Staff  of Princeton University Press
Recipes from the Staff of Princeton University Press

includes eighty-two recipes contributed by current and former members of the Princeton University Press staff. In 115 pages, it draws on the best culinary inspiration of our extended publishing community, their families, and their friends.

We marry the cultures of cooking and publishing a level deeper by tying the names of many of our favorite dishes to titles of our favorite books and, in some cases, names from the Press’s glorious past. And so we have “The Barrington Atlas of of Greek and Roman Chicken,” the “Copywriters’ Crutch Casserole,” and “Scribner’s Scrumptious Stuffed-Shell Tacos,” to go along with many other distinctive PUP offerings. While the Press-specific epithets may be mysterious to some readers, we trust the quality of the recipes and the liveliness of their presentation will compensate for any confusion.

Spoon - Cooked Books: Recipes from the Staff of Princeton University PressSpoon - Cooked Books: Recipes from the Staff of Princeton University PressSpoon - Cooked Books: Recipes from the Staff of Princeton University Press

Each Tuesday, PUP wants to share a recipe from our book for our blog readers to try. Tasty Tuesday is somewhat of a departure from our everyday content. We believe that cooking and cookbooks are a legitimate part of scholarly activity. Scholars like to eat, and many do not eat well enough. “Mens sana in corpore sano,” we always say. We hope the recipes in this book will nourish thought.

TODAY’S TASTY TUESDAY RECIPE:
Prawn-tastic Seafood Paella

Tractatus with Monism on the Half-shell by Rob Tempio
 

This recipe may read like the index from one of Robert Kirk’s Field Guides to Crustaceans, but don’t let that deter you. Just dig in and enjoy. You won’t be disappointed. My wife Erin made this for a dinner party we had and all the guests agreed that it’s prawn-tastic! 

  • 1 red bell pepper, slicedPlate - Cooked Books: Recipes from the Staff of Princeton University Press
  • 1 cup frozen green peas
  • ½ cup olive oil
  • 1 whole chicken, cut into pieces
  • ¼ pound of prosciutto, diced
  • ½ pound chorizo or garlic sausage, sliced
  • 1 pork chop, boned and diced
  • 1 pound medium shrimp, shelled and deveined
  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 1 cup chopped scallions
  • 4 garlic cloves, sliced
  • 2 cups short-grain white rice
  • 1 cup long-grain wild rice
  • 1 quart chicken stock
  • ½ teaspoon saffron threads
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 8 prawns
  • 1 pound cockles (preferably from New Zealand)
  • 1 pound mussels
  • sea salt, to taste
  • ground black pepper, to taste

 Char the red pepper over a gas flame or under a broiler. When cooled, rinse away the seeds and charred skin; dice the pepper. 

Heat the olive oil in a cast-iron skillet. Brown the chicken pieces over medium-high heat. When they are golden on all sides, remove from the oil and sprinkle them with sea salt and ground black pepper. Add the prosciutto, chorizo, and pork to the skillet and brown for 5–10 minutes. 

Bring the chicken broth to a boil and add the saffron threads. Put the red pepper, chicken, prosciutto, chorizo, pork, onion,
bay leaves, lemon juice, scallions, and garlic in a slow cooker and fill with the saffron broth.
Cook on high for 4 hours. 

Pour boiling water over the green peas to defrost. Add the peas and shrimp to the slow cooker and cook on low for another ½ hour. Boil the prawns in a pot of water until they are bright red. 

Steam the cockles and mussels in a pot until the shells open
(about 10 minutes). 

Cook separately the white rice and the wild rice; place a layer of each onto dinner plates. Spoon the meats and broth from the slow cooker over the rice; add the cockles and mussels. 

Top with a prawn and serve.

The Illustrations
The images of food, tableware, and cooking implements that figure prominently in this book are from Menu Designs, published by The Pepin Press, Agile Rabbit Editions, © 1999 and 2005 Pepin Van Roojen, www.pepinpress.com. These images are used with permission. Other incidental images of books and animals are taken from two Dover Electronic Clip Art Publications, Books, Reading and Writing Illustrations (CD-Rom and book © 1992) and 1565 Spot Illustrations and Motifs (CD-Rom and book © 2007) and are used in compliance with terms of use for materials from Dover Publications, Inc.

Tasty Tuesday: What’s Cookin’ With Princeton University Press

Cooked Books:

Dish - Cooked Books: Recipes from the Staff  of Princeton University Press
Recipes from the Staff of Princeton University Press

includes eighty-two recipes contributed by current and former members of the Princeton University Press staff. In 115 pages, it draws on the best culinary inspiration of our extended publishing community, their families, and their friends.

We marry the cultures of cooking and publishing a level deeper by tying the names of many of our favorite dishes to titles of our favorite books and, in some cases, names from the Press’s glorious past. And so we have “The Barrington Atlas of of Greek and Roman Chicken,” the “Copywriters’ Crutch Casserole,” and “Scribner’s Scrumptious Stuffed-Shell Tacos,” to go along with many other distinctive PUP offerings. While the Press-specific epithets may be mysterious to some readers, we trust the quality of the recipes and the liveliness of their presentation will compensate for any confusion.

Spoon - Cooked Books: Recipes from the Staff of Princeton University PressSpoon - Cooked Books: Recipes from the Staff of Princeton University PressSpoon - Cooked Books: Recipes from the Staff of Princeton University Press

Each Tuesday, PUP wants to share a recipe from our book for our blog readers to try. Tasty Tuesday is somewhat of a departure from our everyday content. We believe that cooking and cookbooks are a legitimate part of scholarly activity. Scholars like to eat, and many do not eat well enough. “Mens sana in corpore sano,” we always say. We hope the recipes in this book will nourish thought.

TODAY’S TASTY TUESDAY RECIPE:
Goddess of Transcendental Anger’s

Hot ’n’ Spicy Mango Curry by Meera Vaidyanathan
 

This recipe is modified from one of Madhur Jaffrey’s many cookbooks. Madhur, of course, does not dedicate the curry to the goddess of transcendental anger—that was Sara Lerner’s idea! Plate - Cooked Books: Recipes from the Staff of Princeton University Press

  • 3 medium ripe mangoes
  • 1 teaspoon ground turmeric
  • 1 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 1–1½ teaspoons salt\2 ounces brown sugar (optional)
  • 11 ounces coconut, freshly grated
  • 3–4 fresh hot green chillies, coarsely chopped
  • ½ tablespoon cumin seeds
  • ½ pint yogurt, lightly beaten
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • ½ teaspoon mustard seeds
  • 3–4 dried hot red chillies, broken into halves
  • ½ teaspoon fenugreek seeds
  • 10–12 fresh curry leaves (for garnish)

Peel, pit, and cut the mangoes into 1” pieces. Put the mangoes in a medium-sized pan and add 1 cup of water. Cover and stew for 8–10 minutes over medium-low heat, stirring occasionally. Add the turmeric, cayenne pepper, and salt. Stir well. (If you prefer a sweeter curry or if the mangoes are more tart than sweet, add the brown sugar.)

Place coconut, green chillies, and cumin seeds in a blender, and add up to 1 cup water. Blend to make a fine paste.

When the mangoes are cooked, mash them to a pulp. Add the coconut paste. Mix. Cover and simmer  over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until the mixture becomes thick, about 10–15 minutes.

Then fold in the yogurt and continue cooking, still stirring, until just warmed through. Do not let the mixture come to the boil.

Remove from the heat and put aside. Check for seasoning.

Heat  oil in  a small  saucepan  over a medium-high heat. When  hot, add  mustard seeds. When the mustard seeds begin to pop (a matter of a few seconds), add the chillies, fenugreek seeds, and curry leaves. Stir-fry for a few seconds more, until the chillies darken (but do not allow to blacken). Quickly add the contents of the small pan to the mangoes. Stir to mix.

Serves 4–6. Serve with rice or rotis.

The Illustrations
The images of food, tableware, and cooking implements that figure prominently in this book are from Menu Designs, published by The Pepin Press, Agile Rabbit Editions, © 1999 and 2005 Pepin Van Roojen, www.pepinpress.com. These images are used with permission. Other incidental images of books and animals are taken from two Dover Electronic Clip Art Publications, Books, Reading and Writing Illustrations (CD-Rom and book © 1992) and 1565 Spot Illustrations and Motifs (CD-Rom and book © 2007) and are used in compliance with terms of use for materials from Dover Publications, Inc.

Tasty Tuesday: What’s Cookin’ With Princeton University Press

Cooked Books:

Dish - Cooked Books: Recipes from the Staff  of Princeton University Press
Recipes from the Staff of Princeton University Press

includes eighty-two recipes contributed by current and former members of the Princeton University Press staff. In 115 pages, it draws on the best culinary inspiration of our extended publishing community, their families, and their friends.

We marry the cultures of cooking and publishing a level deeper by tying the names of many of our favorite dishes to titles of our favorite books and, in some cases, names from the Press’s glorious past. And so we have “The Barrington Atlas of of Greek and Roman Chicken,” the “Copywriters’ Crutch Casserole,” and “Scribner’s Scrumptious Stuffed-Shell Tacos,” to go along with many other distinctive PUP offerings. While the Press-specific epithets may be mysterious to some readers, we trust the quality of the recipes and the liveliness of their presentation will compensate for any confusion.

Spoon - Cooked Books: Recipes from the Staff of Princeton University PressSpoon - Cooked Books: Recipes from the Staff of Princeton University PressSpoon - Cooked Books: Recipes from the Staff of Princeton University Press

Each Tuesday, PUP wants to share a recipe from our book for our blog readers to try. Tasty Tuesday is somewhat of a departure from our everyday content. We believe that cooking and cookbooks are a legitimate part of scholarly activity. Scholars like to eat, and many do not eat well enough. “Mens sana in corpore sano,” we always say. We hope the recipes in this book will nourish thought.

TODAY’S TASTY TUESDAY RECIPE: 
Don’t Call It English Rødgrød med Flød
 
A Danish Diarist’s Seduction by Hanne Winarsky

Plate - Cooked Books: Recipes from the Staff  of Princeton University Press
A traditional dessert from Denmark, this is a cold strawberry and rhubarb soup (and you can vary it by adding all sorts of sweet summer berries). It’s easy and keeps really well in the fridge for a few days. Serve as a delicious cold dessert to cool down on hot summer nights!

  • about 6–8 rhubarb stalks water, as directed
  • 2 packages frozen, sliced strawberries in syrup
  • 3 tablespoons sugar, or to taste
  • 3–4 tablespoons cornstarch
  • heavy cream (or half-and-half ), for serving sugar to taste

Take frozen strawberries out of their packages and put into a bowl on the counter to defrost, partially.

Dice rhubarb into ½-inch pieces. Put into a large pot. Add just enough water to cover the bottom of the pot (about 1 cup or so, but it depends on the pot!). Bring to a simmer. Add the rhubarb and cover; simmer over low heat. Check frequently to make sure water has not evaporated. If it has, add a little more—in very small amounts.

When rhubarb is soft (about 15 minutes or so), add strawberries and defrosted syrup from the strawberry packages. Simmer, still on low heat, until strawberries are heated and softened thoroughly (about 10 more minutes).

In a small bowl, mix 4 tablespoons of cornstarch into 2 tablespoons of water. Stir quickly until you have a smooth mixture with no lumps. Add the cornstarch and water to the simmering rhubarb and strawberry mixture. Stir thoroughly; make sure there are no lumps.

Add sugar to taste (about 3 tablespoons—depending on how much rhubarb you’ve used and how much syrup you’ve added; remember the syrup has sugar in it already). I actually prefer to keep it not super-sweet, since you will sprinkle sugar on top when serving.

Turn heat way down, and cook, stirring frequently, for about 5 more minutes, until the rhubarb and strawberry mix is about the consistency of tapioca pudding.

Remove from heat and pour into bowl to cool. Refrigerate.

Serve chilled with heavy cream or half-and-half drizzled on top, and sprinkle with sugar.

Cooking time: about 40 minutes. Serves 6–8.

The Illustrations
The images of food, tableware, and cooking implements that figure prominently in this book are from Menu Designs, published by The Pepin Press, Agile Rabbit Editions, © 1999 and 2005 Pepin Van Roojen, www.pepinpress.com. These images are used with permission. Other incidental images of books and animals are taken from two Dover Electronic Clip Art Publications, Books, Reading and Writing Illustrations (CD-Rom and book © 1992) and 1565 Spot Illustrations and Motifs (CD-Rom and book © 2007) and are used in compliance with terms of use for materials from Dover Publications, Inc.