Jacqueline Bhaba on Child Migration and Human Rights in a Global Age [VIDEO]

Why have our governments and societies been unable to effectively address the human rights and legal problems around the growing number of children who cross borders alone every year? How do we (and how should we) apply laws and policies designed for adult migrants to children and adolescents?

Distinguished human rights and legal scholar Jacqueline Bhabha has been studying complex ethical and legal questions such as these around immigration and children’s rights for over a decade and the results of her research may surprise you. Faculti Media recently posted this video of Bhabha discussing her work and her new book Child Migration and Human Rights in a Global Age:

Angela Stent on US-Russia relations – a video

Angela Stent discusses the issues within her new book The Limits of Partnership: U.S.-Russian Relations in the Twenty-First Century with The Economist’s Europe Editor, John Peet in this video from The Economist. What are the main factors contributing to the prickly political relationship between Russia and the United States? Angela Stent explains here.

 

“Climbing Mount Laurel” Wins 2013 Paul Davidoff Award

Douglas S. Massey, Len Albright, Rebecca Casciano, Elizabeth Derickson & David N. Kinsey - Climbing Mount Laurel: The Struggle for Affordable Housing and Social Mobility in an American Suburb
Winner of the 2013 Paul Davidoff Award, Association of Collegiate Schools of Planning

The Paul Davidoff Award was established three decades ago by ACSP and is one of the most prestigious honors in the academic planning field. It recognizes an outstanding book publication promoting participatory planning and positive social change, opposing poverty and racism as factors in society, and seeking ways to reduce disparities between rich and poor; white and black; men and women. The award is granted biennially to the publication that most reflects Davidoff’s commitments and values.”

According to the committee chair, the entire selection committee was unanimous in its praise for Climbing Mount Laurel, and wrote that the “…work outshined a large and excellent pool of nominees.”

The Award will be formally announced at the ACSP Administrators’ Conference on November 15, 2013, and it will be formally presented at the 2014 conference during the Awards Luncheon.

For more information, click here.

Climbing Mount LaurelUnder the New Jersey State Constitution as interpreted by the State Supreme Court in 1975 and 1983, municipalities are required to use their zoning authority to create realistic opportunities for a fair share of affordable housing for low- and moderate-income households. Mount Laurel was the town at the center of the court decisions. As a result, Mount Laurel has become synonymous with the debate over affordable housing policy designed to create economically integrated communities. What was the impact of the Mount Laurel decision on those most affected by it? What does the case tell us about economic inequality?

Climbing Mount Laurel undertakes a systematic evaluation of the Ethel Lawrence Homes–a housing development produced as a result of the Mount Laurel decision. Douglas Massey and his colleagues assess the consequences for the surrounding neighborhoods and their inhabitants, the township of Mount Laurel, and the residents of the Ethel Lawrence Homes. Their analysis reveals what social scientists call neighborhood effects–the notion that neighborhoods can shape the life trajectories of their inhabitants. Climbing Mount Laurel proves that the building of affordable housing projects is an efficacious, cost-effective approach to integration and improving the lives of the poor, with reasonable cost and no drawbacks for the community at large.

Douglas S. Massey is the Henry G. Bryant Professor of Sociology and Public Affairs at Princeton University and director of its Office of Population Research. Len Albright is assistant professor of sociology at Northeastern University. Rebecca Casciano is the CEO of Rebecca Casciano, LLC. Elizabeth Derickson is a doctoral candidate in sociology at Princeton University. David N. Kinsey is lecturer of public and international affairs at Princeton’s Woodrow Wilson School and a partner in the planning consulting firm Kinsey & Hand.

PUP News of the World

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This is Week Two of our brand new series, PUP News of the World. Every week we will be posting a round-up of all of our most exciting national AND international reviews/interviews/events/etc. that took place in the last week.


http://press.princeton.edu/images/k9943.gifTo start, we have one of our top articles of the week! (Drum roll please…) The Guardian posted an article this past week titled “Writers and critics on the best books of 2013″, which includes an impressive resume of experts of literature who recommended some of the books that impressed them the MOST over this entire year. The list just happened to include FOUR of our Princeton University Press titles, including: Worldly Philosopher: The Odyssey of Albert O. Hirschman by Jeremy Adelman, Italo Calvino: Letters, 1941-1985, and Kafka: The Years of Insight and Kafka: The Decisive Years, both written by Reiner Stach and translated by Shelley Frisch.


On top of that, Kafka: The Years of Insight was also included in the Wall Street Journal’s Holiday Gift Guide to Books, saying “[Stach's] resplendent Kafka: The Years of Insight, tracking Kafka’s final eight years, meditates on the limits of the knowable even as it exhibits unparalleled dedication to the Kafka’s life and work.”


Next, Redeeming The Prince: The Meaning of Machiavelli’s Masterpiece by Maurizio Viroli received a glowing review from Michael Ignatieff at The Atlantic. He says that “Maurizio Viroli wants us to grasp that The Prince was not the cynically devious tract it seems, but rather a patriotic appeal for a redeemer politician to arise and save Italy from foreign invaders and its own shortsighted rulers.” Also, Strategy+Business‘ Theodore Kinni reviewed the title this past week, saying “[Viroli] makes a strong argument for rethinking widely held assumptions about The Prince.”


Undiluted Hocus PocusA blog post went up on our site a few days ago about the article written by our own Vickie Kearn (PUP Mathematics Editors) on Wild About Math, in which she defends Undiluted Hocus-Pocus: The Autobiography of Martin Gardner, which some critics have been saying was not actually written by Gardner before he passed away soon after the book’s completion. Wrong! Thanks for the help Vickie. Gardner’s book was also reviewed by this Saturday’s edition of the Wall Street Journal, in which writer Jordan Ellenberg states: “For those of us who believe that the sciences and the humanities don’t have to be enemies, Martin Gardner is an inspiring model. Undiluted Hocus-Pocus reveals a man immersed in philosophy, religion and literature, even as he makes a career writing about science.”


Brian Bethune of Maclean’s Magazine said of The Book of Job: A Biography by Mark Larrimore: “Princeton University’s excellent series on the lives—meaning the changing interpretations—of great religious books continues with this study of the knottiest of all Biblical texts, a key work in Western culture’s eternal debate over why bad things happen to good people….[Larrimore] is subtle and superbly thorough as he navigates his way not just through Jewish, Christian and secular readings but also the uncertainties about the text and the misconceptions that have grown up around it.”


What W. H. Auden Can Do for You by Alexander McCall Smith received some attention this week from the Sydney Morning Herald, and from Jones Atwater of January Magazine, who said “For some people The Art of War is a touchstone. A guide to living and to life. For others it is Tao Te Ching or even The Tao of Pooh. In his latest book, number one detective Alexander McCall Smith has an admission to make: his own personal touchstone is Anglo-American poet W.H. Auden…..If you are a fan of Auden’s work, this is a must-read.”  Plus, Barbara Berman at The Rumpus selected this book as one of her holiday books column picks, saying “McCall Smith makes an excellent case for a young generation to get acquainted with the life trajectory of Auden as poet and as struggling human.”


http://press.princeton.edu/images/k10074.gifThe Wall Street Journal recently reviewed Would You Kill the Fat Man? The Trolley Problem and What Your Answer Tells Us about Right and Wrong by David Edmonds in their holiday gift books section, saying: “David Edmonds’s vastly more ambitious ‘Would You Kill the Fat Man?’ has the cartoons—and just about everything else you could want in a thoughtful popular treatment of [the trolley problem]. A marvel of economy and learning worn lightly, Mr. Edmonds’s book ranges pleasurably back to Aquinas and forward into the future of robots, who will of course need an ethics just as much as people do.” The title was also an Editors’ Choice in The New York Times Book Review and Katherine Mangu-Ward reviewed it in Reason, saying: “Edmonds enjoyably traces the ever-expanding sub-genre of trolleyology through debates about language, abortion, cannibals, war, and a complicated love quadrangle involving the novelist Iris Murdoch and the philosopher Philippa Foot, offering insights on ethics, politics, and sex along the way.”


Beautiful Geometry by Eli Maor & Eugen Jost received an early review in Scientific American, in which stated: “Mathematicians sometimes compare well-constructed equations to works of art. To them, patterns in numbers hold a beauty at least equal to that found in any sonnet or sculpture. In this book, Maor, a math historian, teams with Jost, an artist, to reveal some of that mathematical majesty using jewel-like visualizations of classic geometric theorems….The result is a book that stimulates the mind as well as the eye.” The book also received mention from a blog called Lifelong Dewey in which the writer is trying to read a book from every Dewey Decimal Section.


Our theme this week seems to be group reviews as three of our titles were featured in The Observer’s “Books of the Year” column for The Guardian. The first, The Locust and the Bee: Predators and Creators in Capitalism’s Future by Geoff Mulgan, was called “[A] rare combination of breadth and detail” by Julian Baggini. The second, Undiluted Hocus-Pocus: The Autobiography of Martin Gardner, was chosen by Simon Singh, and the third, Picasso and Truth: From Cubism to Guernica by T. J. Clark, prompted John Banville to say “Picasso and Truth: From Cubism to Guernica, by TJ Clark (Princeton), is the best thing in a long time on this still contentious painter. Whether or not you agree with Clark’s take on Picasso, you will not look at his paintings in quite the same way ever again.”


Merry White was interviewed about her book, Cooking for Crowds: 40th Anniversary Edition on Talk Radio Europe this week. (She comes in about 40 minutes in)


The Leaderless Economy: Why the World Economic System Fell Apart and How to Fix It by Peter Temin & David Vines was reviewed by Diane Coyle in The Enlightened Economist blog. Of the book, she says: “I would make all political leaders read this book over the holidays – whether in December or a bit later for Chinese New Year – and hope that it prompts them to make a New Year resolution to show true leadership.”


The Enlightened Economist also reviewed The Confidence Trap: A History of Democracy in Crisis from World War I to the Present by David Runciman, calling it “superb”.


There was a discussion of The Plum in the Golden Vase or, Chin P’ing Mei: Volume Five: The Dissolution translated by David Tod Roy on the BBC World Service’s Weekend program.  Patricia Sieber of Ohio State University was interviewed about the collection, and the discussion starts about 46 minutes in.


In yet another group review, The Financial Times posted their Books of the Year, which included a long list of PUP titles:


Last, but not least, Holland Cotter of The New York Times chose Michael Ann Holly’s The Melancholy Art as one of his holiday art book picks, calling it “enchanting”.


COMING SOON: An interactive map of the world where you can check out all of our reviews from multiple countries and continents, sorted by publication.

Benn Steil Wins the 2013 CBN Financial Book of the Year Award

Benn Steil - The Battle of Bretton Woods: John Maynard Keynes, Harry Dexter White, and the Making of a New World Order
Winner of the 2013 CBN Financial Book of the Year, China Business News

China Business News, one of China’s leading daily newspapers, is based in Shanghai. The award selection was made by a jury of influential Chinese academics, international economists, and finance executives.

The Battle of Bretton WoodsWhen turmoil strikes world monetary and financial markets, leaders invariably call for ‘a new Bretton Woods’ to prevent catastrophic economic disorder and defuse political conflict. The name of the remote New Hampshire town where representatives of forty-four nations gathered in July 1944, in the midst of the century’s second great war, has become shorthand for enlightened globalization. The actual story surrounding the historic Bretton Woods accords, however, is full of startling drama, intrigue, and rivalry, which are vividly brought to life in Benn Steil’s epic account.

A remarkably deft work of storytelling that reveals how the blueprint for the postwar economic order was actually drawn, The Battle of Bretton Woods is destined to become a classic of economic and political history.

Benn Steil is senior fellow and director of international economics at the Council on Foreign Relations. His previous book, Money, Markets, and Sovereignty, was awarded the 2010 Hayek Book Prize.

Glen Van Brummelen is Shortlisted for 2013 BSHM Nuemann Book Prize

Glen Van Brummelen - Heavenly Mathematics: The Forgotten Art of Spherical Trigonometry
Shortlisted for the 2013 BSHM Neumann Book Prize, British Society for the History of Mathematics

The British Society for the History of Mathematics (BSHM) has announced the winner of the 2013 Neumann Prize. This prize, named after Oxford mathematician and past BSHM President Dr. Peter Neumann, OBE, is awarded every two years for the best mathematics book containing historical material and aimed at a non-specialist readership.

To read more about the BSHM and this award, click here.

Heavenly MathematicsSpherical trigonometry was at the heart of astronomy and ocean-going navigation for two millennia. The discipline was a mainstay of mathematics education for centuries, and it was a standard subject in high schools until the 1950s. Today, however, it is rarely taught. Heavenly Mathematics traces the rich history of this forgotten art, revealing how the cultures of classical Greece, medieval Islam, and the modern West used spherical trigonometry to chart the heavens and the Earth. Glen Van Brummelen explores this exquisite branch of mathematics and its role in ancient astronomy, geography, and cartography; Islamic religious rituals; celestial navigation; polyhedra; stereographic projection; and more. He conveys the sheer beauty of spherical trigonometry, providing readers with a new appreciation for its elegant proofs and often surprising conclusions.

Heavenly Mathematics is illustrated throughout with stunning historical images and informative drawings and diagrams that have been used to teach the subject in the past. This unique compendium also features easy-to-use appendixes as well as exercises at the end of each chapter that originally appeared in textbooks from the eighteenth to the early twentieth centuries.

Glen Van Brummelen is coordinator of mathematics and the physical sciences at Quest University Canada and president of the Canadian Society for History and Philosophy of Mathematics. His books include The Mathematics of the Heavens and the Earth: The Early History of Trigonometry (Princeton) and Mathematics and the Historian’s Craft.

PUP News of the World

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Attention all book lovers! From now on, every week we will be posting a round-up of all of our most exciting national AND international reviews/interviews/events/etc. that took place in the last week. Why? Because we love to see our books reaching so many people all around the world, and we think you’ll like it too.


The Confidence TrapOur top title this week with six articles, a podcast and an event is… The Confidence Trap: A History of Democracy in Crisis from World War I to the Present by David Runciman!
Runciman had an interview with Prospect, a review in The Guardian where they call The Confidence Trap ‘…a lucid, wholly original book..’, and  op-eds from both The Guardian and The Chronicle, in which he discusses the current state of our democratic system (which isn’t looking too great). He does the same in a podcast with The Guardian. Plus, The Australian calls the book “[r]efreshingly free of received and rehearsed wisdoms,” while New Statesman says that “[Runciman's]work is in the spirit of Alexis de Tocqueville’s Democracy in America, perhaps the greatest book ever written about democracy, and of James Bryce, whose American Commonwealth, an attempt at a sequel to de Tocqueville’s work, Runciman rightly rescues from oblivion.” Want more? Check out this audio clip of  Runciman’s full interview with the RSA.


Next on our list is The Crossley ID Guide: Britain and Ireland by Richard Crossley & Dominic Couzens. They received some love in a review from RSPB Nature’s Home blog, who said “I was delighted to see that the Crossley guide to UK birds lived up to my expectations”, while the Aussie Birding blog gives it a thumbs up for simplifying the bird identification process.


Our other bird title, The Warbler Guide, by Tom Stephenson and Scott Whittle, received praise from The Urban Birder, who said, “This book is certainly worthy of a place on anyone’s heaving book shelf. It is refreshing, stunningly illustrated and importantly, educational. If you want to get to grips with North America’s Warblers, you will need to tightly grip The Warbler Guide!”


Would You Kill the Fat Man? The Trolley Problem and What Your Answer Tells Us about Right and Wrong by David Edmonds was called “[J]aunty, lucid and concise” by the New York Times Book Review this week, while Edmonds himself took the time to participate in a podcast with Rabbi Jeffrey Saks on WebYeshiva.


The Bleeding Heart Libertarians called Mass Flourishing: How Grassroots Innovation Created Jobs, Challenge, and Change by Edmund Phelps, “wide-ranging and highly eclectic” and “both illuminating and thought-provoking” on their blog.


The Great Escape: Health, Wealth, and the Origins of Inequality by Angus Deaton received some praise from Prospect when they said “The Great Escape is a thoughtful work, extensively illustrated with data, from a distinguished economist who tackles a central controversy of our time in a style refreshingly free of ideological baggage”, while Deaton also did a podcast with Russ Roberts to talk about our standard of living and The Great Escape. The interview was then discussed on another popular economics blog, Café Hayek.


Prospect reviewed The Book of Job: A Biography by Mark Larrimore and said that “Larrimore is particularly good at helping us understand ancient and medieval readings of Job.”


On a similarly short note, The Battle of Bretton Woods: John Maynard Keynes, Harry Dexter White, and the Making of a New World Order by Benn Steil was reviewed by the London Review of Books.


McCallSmith_AudenWhat W. H. Auden Can Do for You by Alexander McCall Smith had a good week. A review from Spectator called it a “kindly, avuncular, contemplative opusculum” and an “earnest, unpretentious, endearing rumination”, which is a lot of fancy words for ‘this book rocks!’ A review from Scotsman claims “The book is written in the voice we have come to know from McCall Smith’s fiction: calm, reassuring, able to disentangle complicated ideas and emotions and to express them in ways we recognise and understand as our own. To those with a passing interest in Auden it will provide affirming delight.” Lastly, the Irish Times reviewed this title as well expressing particular interest in the passages about Auden’s poetry.


Art and the Second World War by Monica Bohm-Duchen was reviewed in Publishers Weekly in which they said “In this well-researched, clear-eyed assessment of art’s relationship to the war that ‘has left the darkest and most indelible mark on modern society,’ Bohm-Duchen (After Auschwitz) presents a sobering overview of the official and nonofficial fine art produced in warring nations…[T]he book is particularly impressive for the obscure work it covers…Bohm-Duchen punctuates the narrative with astute insights… Brimming with chilling full-color images, this handsome volume reaffirms the importance of WWII in relation to the fine arts.” Quite the compliment!


 On a racier note, our last installment of The Plum in the Golden Vase or, Chin P’ing Mei (Volume Five: The Dissolution), translated by David Tod Roy, was recently reviewed by The New York Times, in which they say that, aside from its erotic nature, this book is also “the first long Chinese narrative to focus not on mythical heroes or military adventures, but on ordinary people and everyday life, chronicled down to the minutest details of food, clothing, household customs, medicine, games and funeral rites, with exact prices given for just about everything, including the favor of bribe-hungry officials up and down the hierarchy.”


Change They Can’t Believe In: The Tea Party and Reactionary Politics in America by Christopher S. Parker & Matt A. Barreto drew some attention this week in an article by Newsmax about racism in Washington D.C. against Obama, even after he’s spent almost eight years in office.


Another of our more political titles, The Bankers’ New Clothes: What’s Wrong with Banking and What to Do about It by Anat Admati & Martin Hellwig had some international intrigue this week when Admati traveled to Amsterdam and was interviewed by three major papers there: De Telegraaf, NRC Handelsblad and Het Financieele Dagblad.


 William Helmreich had some attention this week for his book, The New York Nobody Knows: Walking 6,000 Miles in the City, in an interview with CUNY TV. He also has an event coming up next week that you can learn about here.


James Kingsland from The Guardian took notice of Cells to Civilizations: The Principles of Change That Shape Life by Enrico Coen, saying “Coen’s intellectual honesty is commendable.”


Kenneth T. MacLeish’s book, Making War at Fort Hood: Life and Uncertainty in a Military Community was interviewed by New Books in Anthropology. The link for the full interview can be found on the bottom left corner of the page.


John Sides, co-author of  The Gamble: Choice and Chance in the 2012 Presidential Election with Lynn Vavreck, recently participated in a roundtable discussion on MSNBC about ‘potential turning points in the race for the White House.’


COMING SOON: An interactive map of the world where you can check out all of our reviews from multiple countries and continents, sorted by publication.

The 50th Anniversary of the JFK Assassination

JFKToday marks the 50th anniversary of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. The 35th President of the United States, he was one of four presidents who have ever been assassinated while in office (the other three being Lincoln, McKinley and Garfield). He was shot and killed in a presidential motorcade in Dallas, Texas on November 22nd, 1963 at 12:30 pm.

To honor JFK and all of our fearless leaders of the United States since George Washington was inaugurated in 1789, we’re posting a list of some of our best presidential titles to remind us all of the dedication these men put forth in their time leading our country.

Rest in Peace, Mr. President.


Quotable Jefferson
The Quotable Jefferson

Collected & Edited by John P. Kaminski

The Quotable Jefferson is the first book to put Jefferson’s words in context with a substantial introduction, a chronology of Jefferson’s life, the source of each quotation, an appendix identifying Jefferson’s correspondents, and a comprehensive index. The main section of Jefferson quotations, which are arranged alphabetically by topic, is followed by three other fascinating sections of quotations: Jefferson on his contemporaries, his contemporaries on him, and Jefferson on himself.

Nixon
Richard Nixon: Speeches, Writings, Documents

Edited and Introduced by Rick Perlstein

The first book to present America’s most controversial president in his own words across his entire career, this unique collection of Richard Nixon’s most important writings dramatically demonstrates why he has had such a profound impact on American life. This volume gathers everything from schoolboy letters to geostrategic manifestos and Oval Office transcripts to create a fascinating portrait of Nixon, one that is enriched by an extensive introduction in which Rick Perlstein puts forward a major reinterpretation of the thirty-seventh president’s rise and fall.

Reagan
Morning in America: How Ronald Reagan Invented the 1980′s

By: Gil Troy

Did America’s fortieth president lead a conservative counterrevolution that left liberalism gasping for air? The answer, for both his admirers and his detractors, is often “yes.” In Morning in America, Gil Troy argues that the Great Communicator was also the Great Conciliator. His pioneering and lively reassessment of Ronald Reagan’s legacy takes us through the 1980s in ten year-by-year chapters, integrating the story of the Reagan presidency with stories of the decade’s cultural icons and watershed moments-from personalities to popular television shows.

Bush
The Presidency of George W. Bush: A First Historical Assessment

Edited by Julian E. Zelizer

The Presidency of George W. Bush brings together some of today’s top American historians to offer the first in-depth look at one of the most controversial U.S. presidencies. Emotions surrounding the Bush presidency continue to run high–conservatives steadfastly defend its achievements, liberals call it a disgrace. This book examines the successes as well as the failures, covering every major aspect of Bush’s two terms in office. It puts issues in broad historical context to reveal the forces that shaped and constrained Bush’s presidency–and the ways his presidency reshaped the nation.

Obama
Reading Obama: Dreams, Hope, and the American Political Tradition (New in Paper)

By: James T. Kloppenberg

Reading Obama reveals the sources of Obama’s commitment to democratic deliberation: the books he has read, the visionaries who have inspired him, the social movements and personal struggles that have shaped his thinking. Kloppenberg shows that Obama’s positions on social justice, religion, race, family, and America’s role in the world do not stem from a desire to please everyone but from deeply rooted–although currently unfashionable–convictions about how a democracy must deal with difference and conflict.

Presidential Leadership
Presidential Leadership and the Creation of the American Era

By: Joseph S. Nye, Jr

Spanning multiple presidencies, this book examines the foreign policy decisions of the presidents who presided over the most critical phases of America’s rise to world primacy in the twentieth century, and assesses the effectiveness and ethics of their choices. The book shows how transformational presidents like Wilson and Reagan changed how America sees the world, but argues that transactional presidents like Eisenhower and the elder Bush were sometimes more effective and ethical. It also draws important lessons for today’s uncertain world, in which presidential decision making is more critical than ever.

Presidential Difference
The Presidential Difference: Leadership Style from FDR to Barack Obama (Third Edition)

By: Fred I. Greenstein

In The Presidential Difference, Greenstein provides a fascinating and instructive account of the presidential qualities that have served well and poorly in the Oval Office, beginning with Franklin D. Roosevelt’s first hundred days. He surveys each president’s political skill, vision, cognitive style, organizational capacity, ability to communicate, and emotional intelligence–and argues that the last is the most important in predicting presidential success. Throughout, Greenstein offers a series of bottom-line judgments on each of his 13 subjects as well as an overarching theory of why presidents succeed or fail.


The Buzz on Angus Deaton Events

The Great EscapeAngus Deaton, author of The Great Escape: Health, Wealth, and the Origins of Inequality recently did a podcast with Russ Roberts to talk about our standard of living and The Great Escape. Deaton surveys the improvements in life expectancy and income both in the developed and undeveloped world. Inequality of both health and wealth are discussed as well. The conversation closes with a discussion of foreign aid and what rich nations can do for the poor.

The interview was then discussed on another popular economics blog, Café Hayek, which includes an excerpt of the interview.

He will also be at an event at the World Bank on December 2nd at 12:30. Unfortunately, there isn’t an event page for this anywhere yet, but we’ll sure to post more about it when we can!

Martin Ruhs to Speak on Panel at Kellogg University of Oxford

The Global Governance of International Migration: What Next?

The Global Governance of International Migration: What Next?

The regulation of international migration and migrant rights are among the most contested public policy issues around the world. In 2013-14 a series of high-level policy meetings (including the High-Level Dialogue on Migration and Development in New York, and the Global Forum on Migration and Development in Stockholm) will debate the global governance of migration, migrant rights and development. Do we need more global governance of international migration? If so, why and what should it aim to achieve? How, if at all, should international migration be integrated in the post-2015 development agenda? Come and join the debate!

Chair: Robin Cohen (Kellogg College and International Migration Institute, Oxford)

Panellists:

Timetable:
17.00-18.30 Panel Discussion in the lecture hall at the University of Oxford Museum of Natural History
18.30-19.30 Drinks Reception at Kellogg College
19.30-21.30 Dinner at Kellogg College

Both the panel discussion and drinks reception are FREE of charge. The dinner at Kellogg College is £15.00 per person.

To book please email: bookings@kellogg.ox.ac.uk
Please specify whether your booking pertains to the discussion, drinks and/or dinner. Include names of all guests and any dietary requirements.

Event details:

Fri, 29/11/2013 – 5:00pm – 9:30pm

Jonathan M. Ladd Named Finalist for 2012 Frank Luther Mott Award

Jonathan M. Ladd - Why Americans Hate the Media and How It Matters
Finalist for the 2012 Frank Luther Mott – Kappa Tau Alpha Journalism and Mass Communication Research Award

The award is given in honor of Frank Luther Mott, Pulitzer Prize winner, educator and long-time leader of Kappa Tau Alpha. The competition has been held annually since1944. The prize was presented Aug. 9 in Washington, D.C. during the annual convention of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

To read more about this award, click here.

Why Americans Hate The Media and How It MattersAs recently as the early 1970s, the news media was one of the most respected institutions in the United States. Yet by the 1990s, this trust had all but evaporated. Why has confidence in the press declined so dramatically over the past 40 years? And has this change shaped the public’s political behavior? This book examines waning public trust in the institutional news media within the context of the American political system and looks at how this lack of confidence has altered the ways people acquire political information and form electoral preferences.

Jonathan Ladd argues that in the 1950s, ’60s, and early ’70s, competition in American party politics and the media industry reached historic lows. When competition later intensified in both of these realms, the public’s distrust of the institutional media grew, leading the public to resist the mainstream press’s information about policy outcomes and turn toward alternative partisan media outlets. As a result, public beliefs and voting behavior are now increasingly shaped by partisan predispositions. Ladd contends that it is not realistic or desirable to suppress party and media competition to the levels of the mid-twentieth century; rather, in the contemporary media environment, new ways to augment the public’s knowledgeability and responsiveness must be explored.

Drawing on historical evidence, experiments, and public opinion surveys, this book shows that in a world of endless news sources, citizens’ trust in institutional media is more important than ever before.

Jonathan M. Ladd is associate professor of government and public policy at Georgetown University. He received his PhD in politics from Princeton University.

Christopher S. Parker to Speak at Colby College

Change They Can't Believe InChristopher S. Parker, one of the co-authors of Change They Can’t Believe In: The Tea Party and Reactionary Politics in America, will be speaking at Colby College (located in Waterville, Maine) on Wednesday, November 20th at 7:00 PM about his book.

Are Tea Party supporters merely a group of conservative citizens concerned about government spending? Or are they racists who refuse to accept Barack Obama as their president because he’s not white? Change They Can’t Believe In offers an alternative argument– that the Tea Party is driven by the reemergence of reactionary movement in American Politics which is fueled by a fear that America has changed for the worse.

To learn more about the event, click here.

Can’t make it to the event? C-Span will be taping the lecture, so check your local listing to find out what channel to tune in to (or to set your TiVo for).