#UPWeek Presses in Pictures

The second day of University Press Week is looking good. Five university presses bring us a visual celebration of scholarly publishing.

Upress week

Hop over to these blogs to see university presses in pictures:

Indiana University Press

Stanford University Press

Fordham University Press

University Press of Florida

Also, Johns Hopkins University Press brings us a Q&A with JHUP Art Director Martha Sewell and a short film of author and marine illustrator Val Kells in her studio.




Kicking off University Press Week! #UPWeek

Upress week

It’s finally here! This week, we bring you exciting content from 31 different university presses. We kick off the week with our first topic: collaboration. Yesterday, our group of university presses discussed titles or projects that illustrate the value of collaboration in scholarly communications and in their work. Check it out…

University Press of Colorado

This one is the cat’s meow. The University Press of Colorado discusses a collaboration with the Veterinary Information Network on a recent textbook, Basic Veterinary Immunology.

University of Georgia Press

Our next post involves an award-winning project. The University of Georgia Press talks about the New Georgia Encyclopedia (NGE) partnership, which includes the Georgia Humanities Council, UGA libraries, GALILEO, and the Press. The NGE is the state’s award-winning, online only, multi-media reference work on the people, places, events, and institutions of Georgia. Peachy-keen!

Duke University Press

Looking to hear from a university press author? Duke University Press has you covered. Author Eben Kirksey writes about his recent collaboration, the Multispecies Salon. You do not want to miss the images — preview them here.

University of California Press

The University of California Press shows how university press work connects to front page news. Authors Dr. Paul Farmer and Dr. Jim Yong Kim discuss the collaborative work they are doing to fight the Ebola epidemic in West Africa.

University of Virginia Press

Check out this account of a collaboration between the Press and the Presidential Recordings Project at the Miller Center to create ‘Chasing Shadows,’ a book on the origins of Watergate. The project includes a special ebook and web site allowing readers to listen to the actual Oval Office conversations. We can’t wait to have a listen for ourselves.

McGill-Queen’s University Press

McGill-Queen’s University Press provides details on Landscape Architecture in Canada, a major national project with support from scholars across the country and published simultaneously in French and English by two university presses. Landscape Architecture in Canada provides a detailed panorama of the man-made landscapes that vary as widely as the country’s geography.

Texas A&M University Press

This year, our friends in Texas launched a new consumer advocacy series with the Texas A&M School of Public Health, whose mission is to improve the health of communities through education, research, service, outreach, and creative partnerships. Check out the post for more information.

Yale University Press

Mark Polizzotti, director of the publications program at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, will contribute a guest post to Yale University Press’s ‘Museum Quality Books’ series. The series consists of guest posts from the knowledgeable, erudite, witty, insightful, and altogether delightful directors of publishing at the museums and galleries with whom Yale UP collaborates on books.

University of Chicago Press

University of Chicago Press takes a look back at year one of an exciting project, the Turabian Teacher Collaborative. This unique collaboration between high school classroom teachers, university professors, and a university press began in 2013 as a pilot project to test the effectiveness of Kate L. Turabian’s Student’s Guide to Writing College Papers at helping high schools meet the ELA Common Core State Standards.

Project MUSE/Johns Hopkins University Press

Last but certainly not least, we turn to Project MUSE, which is a key example of collaboration in the university press world. Project MUSE resulted from collaboration between a university press and university library.


University Press Week is next week! #UPWeek

Monday is the start of University Press Week! Join us as we highlight the extraordinary work of nonprofit scholarly publishers and their many contributions to culture, the academy, and an informed society.

What is #UPWeek you ask?

In the summer of 1978, President Jimmy Carter proclaimed a University Press Week “in recognition of the impact, both here and abroad, of American university presses on culture and scholarship.” That influence continues today, as does the increasing vitality of university press publishing programs, the many ways and means by which works are now produced and distributed, and the urgent need for articulate discourse in times pervaded by sound bites. Pretty cool, huh?

This year, we have a lot to celebrate.

All week long, 31 different university presses will be bringing you the latest and greatest news, including what’s trending in their offices, on their shelves, and in their plans for the future. Every day, tune in here for a new roundup of posts from university presses. We’ll visit MIT on out to the University of Washington, with many stops in between. This year’s topics include:

upress week topics

We begin the week with a look at what’s new in press collaboration, and then we’ll give you an inside look at our presses. Can you spot university presses in pop culture? Just you wait — on Wednesday, we’ll provide the latest scoop. Then on Thursday, we take a look back at some terrific projects that have put university presses on the map. On Friday, we’ll recommend some topics and authors for you to follow — in addition to a discussion of social media.

Gearing Up

So what can you do to prep for a week of enlightening posts and great conversations? Check out this map of university presses to find which is closest to you. When it comes to university presses, you’re among friends — lots of them. The AAUP has over 130 members, all sharing a common commitment to scholarship, the academy, and society.

See you back here on Monday!

Upress week

common commitments to scholarship, the academy, and society – See more at: http://www.aaupnet.org/#sthash.ZdvOvvjy.dpuf
common commitments to scholarship, the academy, and society – See more at: http://www.aaupnet.org/#sthash.ZdvOvvjy.dpuf
common commitments to scholarship, the academy, and society – See more at: http://www.aaupnet.org/#sthash.ZdvOvvjy.dpuf

Day 5 of #UPWeek is finally here — the global reach of university presses

upweekToday is the last day of the University Press Week Blog Tour and it’s finally our turn! Today Peter Dougherty considers the importance of finding foreign language publishers to translate and publish UP-generated works. We are joined by a raft of other publishers considering the various ways university presses are expanding the global reach of the scholarship we publish.

Columbia University Press
Georgetown University Press

Discusses how Georgetown University Press gives its readers the tools they need to have a global reach themselves through our foreign language learning materials, our international career guides, and our international affairs titles.

Indiana University Press
IUP presents an overview of their Mellon-funded Framing the Global project which will develop and disseminate new knowledge, approaches, and methods in the field of global research.
Johns Hopkins University Press

From book translations to international marketing and the growth of Project MUSE into many different nations, the JHU Press can’t help but think beyond the borders of the United States.

New York University Press
Chip Rossetti, managing editor of the Library of Arabic Literature (LAL), will discuss the new LAL series, an ambitious international project which comes out of a partnership between NYU Press and NYU Abu Dhabi.
Princeton University Press
Peter Dougherty, Press Director, writes about the importance of foreign language translations to the future of university press economic health and fulfillment of our missions.
University of Wisconsin Press

Press director Sheila Leary profiles the publishing career of Jan Vansina, one of the founders of the field of African history (rather than colonial history). His innovative seven books with the University of Wisconsin Press from the 1960s to the present have continually broken new ground, influencing the historiography of Africa and several related disciplines.

Yale University Press

Ivan Lett writes on recent transatlantic collaboration of US-UK marketing initiatives for Yale University Press globally published titles, series, and digital products.

The complete schedule for the blog tour is located here.

Game of Tongues — PUP Director Peter Dougherty Reflects on the Importance of Translations (#UPWeek)

University Press Week Logo

This post is presented as part of the University Press Week Blog Tour. November 11-15 is set aside as a week to celebrate the myriad ways university presses contribute to scholarly communication and society at large. Please support our colleagues by exploring more posts in the tour via the links below. For a complete schedule, click here.



If you want to get a great sense of the global reach of the university press and, not incidentally, of the potential of forthcoming publications, you could do worse than observing a few days’ worth of foreign rights meetings at the Frankfurt Book Fair.

Perched in a folding chair at a card table in the Princeton University Press booth last month, I watched my colleague Kim Williams, PUP’s foreign rights manager (who operates from our office in Oxfordshire), hold 80 meetings with nearly 200 publishers from 22 countries, representing 17 languages around the world. Meetings such as Kim’s–going on eight frenetic, exhausting hours a day over the five-day forced march of Frankfurt–comprise the annual ritual wherein the world decides which books and which ideas get dispersed across nations. The word “dissemination” is sometimes used to characterize the mission of university presses. Frankfurt is an example of dissemination of the highest, most sophisticated, most intricately orchestrated kind.

Pitching our books to Chinese publishers at #fbf13 - cheers to Cheers Publishing!

Pitching our books to Chinese publishers at #fbf13 – cheers to Cheers Publishing! (credit: @PUP_Rights)

Not only geography, but history matters in the annual translation transaction Olympiad. Kim Williams knows her counterparts at the foreign publishers and has worked with many of them for years. She knows their tastes, interests, and strengths. The experience she brings to the task and the development of these relationships, invest her exchanges with insight and efficiency, providing a kind of multicultural shorthand for conducting the world’s book business.

And the game of tongues matters. Over the past ten years the number of Princeton’s translation licenses has nearly tripled. Rights deals in Chinese over this period have increased almost tenfold, translations into Japanese have almost tripled, and Korean rights deals have also increased dramatically. And this growth is not limited to Asian markets. We’ve seen equally strong growth in the number of Turkish, Czech, Brazilian Portuguese, and Spanish translations, among others. Taken all together this increased activity reflects changes in international economic development and national cultural priorities. This upward trend in translation activity will only increase as economic development rises. It would be interesting to know how many of our translated titles win awards and other accolades in their adopted languages.

And much as the annual idea-swap in Frankfurt provides us with a window on the world, it also tells us a lot about ourselves. From a distance, it tells us which subjects “travel” well, yielding valuable insights into list-planning and therefore into editorial acquisitions. From a closer standpoint, it provides a powerfully compelling preview of how a publisher’s upcoming list is likely to perform. If three dozen foreign publishers are panting over a particular title, chances are you’ve got a winner in English as well as around the world in other language markets.

Finally, a week at a rights table in Frankfurt gives a publisher a glimpse into its soul. Just how good are we? Are certain lists as strong as we think they are? Are we current or are we yesterday’s news? Do our lists have the three Ds–depth, dimension, and durability–or are we publishing mere ephemera? The five-day stress test in front of the world’s hard-bitten foreign publishers answers those questions, sometimes painfully, other times reassuringly.

As the global university press evolves, table talk in Frankfurt will continue to serve as a vital indicator of our impact around the world and our insight into ourselves.

Peter J. Dougherty
Princeton University Press


Click through to check out the covers of various On Bullshit translations.

For more information about Princeton University Press’s foreign rights program, please visit http://press.princeton.edu/europe/content/pages/rights.html

No Matter How You Say It — It’s Still “On Bullshit” — books in translation for #UPWeek

Peter Dougherty’s consideration of the impact of translations for university presses is available here. One of the best parts of getting our books into translation, is seeing what the foreign publishers do with the cover, title, and design. This poster illustrates a few interpretations of the NY Times best-seller On Bullshit by Harry G. Frankfurt. On Bullshit is one of our success stories. It has been published in more than 25 languages.


#UPWeek Blog Tour turns its attention to the importance of regional publishing on Day 4

upweekUniversity Presses make tremendous scholarly contributions, but they also operate as local publishers, publishing the best regional books for their respective states. These books can be anything from cookbooks to walking tours, narrative histories to pop culture and art coffee table books. It may be tempting to write off this portion of our publishing programs as frivolous, but as the blog tour stops demonstrate today, this would be a big mistake.

Fordham University Press

Fredric Nachbaur, Press Director, writes about establishing the Empires State Editions imprint to better brand and market the regional books, reflect the mission of the university, and co-publish books with local institutions.

Louisiana State University Press
LSU Press discusses the challenges they face in capturing an authentic representation of Louisiana’s culture. How do the editors work with authors to capture the nuances of Louisiana’s food, music, and art?
Syracuse University Press

Regional author, Chuck D’Imperio discusses the roots of regional writing in many of the “classics.” From oral testimonies to local guidebooks, these stories contribute to the culture and history of the region.

University of Alabama Press
University of Nebraska Press

UNP’s Editor-in-Chief Derek Krissoff defines the meaning of place in University Press publishing.

University of North Carolina Press

UNC Press editorial director Mark Simpson-Vos highlights the special value of regional university press
publishing at a time when the scale for so much of what we do emphasizes the global.

University Press of Kentucky
UPK considers its role in preserving Kentucky’s cultural heritage and some of the fun things that make KY (and KY books) unique.
University Press of Mississippi

UPM Marketing Manager and author of two books Steve Yates gives his thoughts on the scale of regional publishing and shares the sage advice of businessmen

Oregon State University Press
A great quick intro to regional publishing and highlights from OSU Press’s regional catalog.

The complete schedule for the blog tour is located here.

Day 3 of the #UPWeek Blog Tour focuses on specialty subjects from some of our colleagues

upweekFor Day 3 of the University Press Week Blog Tour, we turn our attention to the content–the subjects of the books, journals, series, and everything else–we publish. This is an opportunity for presses to highlight special subject areas in which they publish, or subjects for which their press is particularly well known.

MIT Press

Gita Manaktala, Editorial Director, writes about the possibilities of the web. MIT Press authors are increasingly using the internet for scholarship, finding newly mediated ways to teach, to conduct research, to present data, and to engage with various publics.

Texas A&M University Press
University of Georgia Press
Nik Heynen, Deborah Cowen, and Melissa W. Wright, series co-editors, will discuss UGA Press geography books, specifically as they relate to the Geographies of Justice and Social Transformation series.
University of Pennsylvania Press

Penn Press acquisitions editors discuss the foundations and future of some of the press’s key subject areas.

University of Toronto Press

A discussion of the Medieval and Renaissance Studies lists.

Wilfrid Laurier University Press

Cheryl Lousley, editor of the Environmental Humanities series, writes about the engagement of environmental issues through the humanities disciplines, such as literature, film, and media studies, for example. She outlines the genesis of the series and discusses some of the most recent publications.

The complete schedule for the blog tour is located here.

Day 2 of the #UPWeek Blog Tour is underway with posts on the future of scholarly communication

upweekThe focus of Day 2 of the University Press Week Blog Tour is “The Future of Scholarly Communications”. University Presses are engaged in a wide variety of new initiatives designed to acquire and publish meaningful scholarship in new and innovative ways and in partnerships with libraries, organizations, and other groups with vested interests in this area of what we do. Today we celebrate a few of these initiatives and take a peek at what the future holds for us all.

Duke University Press
Priscilla Wald, Professor of English and Women’s Studies at Duke University, on the slow future of scholarly communication.
Harvard University Press
Jeffrey Schnapp, faculty director of metaLAB (at) Harvard and editor of the new metaLABprojects book series, on the emerging currents of experimental scholarship for which the series provides a platform.
Stanford University Press

Alan Harvey, Press Director, discusses the challenges presented by new technologies in publishing, and how the industry model is adapting to new reading-consumption habits.

Temple University Press

Alex Holzman explores the partnerships university presses and libraries can forge as the means of communicating scholarship evolves.

University of Minnesota Press
Editor Dani Kasprzak describes a new UMP initiative.
University of Texas Press

Robert Devens, Assistant Editor-in-Chief for the University of Texas Press, on the future of scholarly communication.

University of Virginia Press

Historian Holly Shulman, editor of The Dolley Madison Digital Edition and the forthcoming People of the Founding Era, looks at the need for university presses to adapt to new technologies, while ackowledging the difficulties of doing so.

The complete schedule for the blog tour is located here.

University Press Week begins today! Visit these tour stops to learn about who we are and what we do. #UPWeek

upweekThe focus of Day 1 of the University Press Week Blog Tour is “Meet the Press”. This can mean anything from introducing individuals who work at university presses to features on what university presses do and how we contribute to scholarly communication and, in many cases, general reading and knowledge.

McGill-Queen’s University Press
Editors Jonathan Crago and Kyla Madden reflect on their university press experiences and what’s in the cards for MQUP’s future.
Penn State Press
University of Illinois Press
University of Hawai‘i Press
UHP’s soon-to-retire journals manager reflects on a long and well-traveled career with stops at many presses.
University of Missouri Press
University Press of Colorado
Laura Furney, managing editor at University Press of Colorado has been with the press for 20 years and will describe her role in two recent developments.
University Press of Florida
A report from a UPF acquisitions editor who is working to develop and grow innovative new subject areas.

The complete schedule for the blog tour is located here.

Free #UPWeek event “Innovation in Scholarly Publishing”

upweekAs part of the celebration of University Press Week, Association of American University Presses is hosting a free online program “Innovation in Scholarly Publishing”, November 15 at 2:30 PM: http://shindig.com/event/innovation

Join speakers *William Germano*, Dean of Cooper Union, author, and former Editor in Chief of Columbia University Press, *Kathleen Fitzpatrick*, Director of Scholarly Communication at the Modern Language Association, and *Gita Manaktala*, Editorial Director at The MIT Press and moderator *Carlin Romano*, Critic-at-Large of/The Chronicle of Higher Education/, former President of the National Book Critics Circle, and a Guggenheim Fellow, for a discussion of the implications of recent technological and cultural shifts for the work of AAUP members and their authors.

More information and RSVP: http://shindig.com/event/innovation

Don’t forget that the University Press Week Blog Tour starts on Monday, November 11! Complete schedule is available here. Princeton University Press will contribute to the tour on Friday.

37 presses (including PUP!) will kick off University Press Week (November 10-16) with a blog tour #UPWeek


Click to view a larger version of the schedule

Next month, the Association of American University Presses (AAUP) will celebrate University Press Week November 10-16. This week started back in the summer of 1978 when President Jimmy Carter proclaimed a University Press Week “in recognition of the impact, both here and abroad, of American university presses on culture and scholarship.”

In the spirit of partnership that pervades the university press community, Princeton University Press and 36 other presses will unite for the AAUP’s second annual blog tour during University Press Week. This tour will highlight the value of university presses and the contributions they make to scholarship and our society. Individual presses will blog on a different theme each day, including profiles of university press staff members, the future of scholarly communication, subject area spotlights, the importance of regional publishing, and the global reach of university presses.

The tour will run November 11-15, and comes to our blog on November 15, with a post by Press Director Peter Dougherty reflecting on his trip to the Frankfurt Book Fair. For a complete University Press Week blog tour schedule click here. And if you want to look back at what we did last year, you can re-read this fantastic interview with Dorothea von Moltke the owner of Labyrinth Books.

In addition to the blog tour, the AAUP and other member presses are planning several features and events for University Press Week. For more information, visit universitypressweek.org.