Watch Diana Buchwald, editor of The Collected Papers of Albert Einstein, introduce The Digital Einstein Papers

Explore The Digital Einstein Papers for yourself: http://einsteinpapers.press.princeton.edu


Produced in association with Caltech Academic Media Technologies. © 2014 California Institute of Technology

Princeton University Press launches The Digital Einstein Papers

DEP front page

Launching today, THE DIGITAL EINSTEIN PAPERS is a publicly available website of the collected and translated papers of Albert Einstein that allows readers to explore the writings of the world’s most famous scientist as never before.

Princeton, NJ – December 5, 2014 – Princeton University Press, in partnership with Tizra, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, and California Institute of Technology, announces the launch of THE DIGITAL EINSTEIN PAPERS (http://einsteinpapers.press.princeton.edu). This unique, authoritative resource provides full public access to the translated and annotated writings of the most influential scientist of the twentieth century: Albert Einstein.

“Princeton University Press has a long history of publishing books by and about Albert Einstein, including the incredible work found in The Collected Papers of Albert Einstein,” said Peter Dougherty, director of Princeton University Press. “We are delighted to make these texts openly available to a global audience of researchers, scientists, historians, and students keen to learn more about Albert Einstein. This project not only furthers the mission of the press to publish works that contribute to discussions that have the power to change our world, but also illustrates our commitment to pursuing excellence in all forms of publishing—print and digital.”

THE DIGITAL EINSTEIN PAPERS website presents the complete contents of The Collected Papers of Albert Einstein, and, upon its launch, the website—http://einsteinpapers.press.princeton.edu—will contain 5,000 documents covering the first forty-four years of Einstein’s life, up to and including the award of the Nobel Prize in Physics and his long voyage to the Far East. Additional material will be available on the website approximately eighteen months after the print publication of new volumes of The Collected Papers. Eventually, the website will provide access to all of Einstein’s writings and correspondence, accompanied by scholarly annotation and apparatus.

What sorts of gems will users discover in THE DIGITAL EINSTEIN PAPERS? According to Diana L. Kormos-Buchwald, director of the Einstein Papers Project, “This material has been carefully researched and annotated over the last twenty-five years and contains all of Einstein’s scientific and popular writings, drafts, lecture notes, and diaries, and his professional and personal correspondence up to his forty-fourth birthday—so users will discover major scientific articles on the general theory of relativity, gravitation, and quantum theory alongside his love letters to his first wife, correspondence with his children, and his intense exchanges with other notable scientists, philosophers, mathematicians, and political personalities of the early twentieth century.”

Buchwald also noted that THE DIGITAL EINSTEIN PAPERS will introduce current and future generations to important ideas and moments in history, saying, “It is exciting to think that thanks to the careful application of new technology, this work will now reach a much broader audience and stand as the authoritative digital source for Einstein’s written legacy.”

THE DIGITAL EINSTEIN PAPERS enables readers to experience the writings of Albert Einstein in unprecedented ways. Advance search technology improves discoverability by allowing users to perform keyword searches across volumes of Einstein’s writing and, with a single click, navigate between the original languages in which the texts were written and their English translations. Further exploration is encouraged by extensive explanatory footnotes, introductory essays, and links to the Einstein Archives Online, where there are thousands of high-quality digital images of Einstein’s writings.

The Tizra platform was selected for this project, according to Kenneth Reed, manager of digital production for Princeton University Press, because of its highly flexible, open, and intuitive content delivery approach, and its strong reputation for reliability. Equally important was creating a user-friendly reading experience.

“One of the reasons we chose Tizra is that we wanted to preserve the look and feel of the volumes,” said Reed. “You’ll see the pages as they appear in the print volumes, with added functionality such as linking between the documentary edition and translation, as well as linking to the Einstein Archives Online, and the ability to search across all the volumes in English and German.”

THE DIGITAL EINSTEIN PAPERS is an unprecedented scholarly collaboration that highlights what is possible when technology, important content, and a commitment to global scholarly communication are brought together. We hope you will join us in celebrating this achievement and invite you to explore Einstein’s writings with the links below.

Work on THE DIGITAL EINSTEIN PAPERS was supported by the Harold W. McGraw, Jr. endowment, the California Institute of Technology, the National Science Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Arcadia Fund, U.K.

A Sampling of Documents Found in THE DIGITAL EINSTEIN PAPERS

Website: http://einsteinpapers.press.princeton.edu

“My Projects for the Future” — In this high school French essay, a seventeen-year-old Einstein describes his future plans, writing that “young people especially like to contemplate bold projects.”

Letter to Mileva Marić — The first volume of The Collected Papers of Albert Einstein revealed that the young Einstein had fathered an illegitimate daughter. In this letter to his sweetheart and future wife, Einstein, age twenty-two, expresses his happiness at the birth of his daughter Lieserl, and asks about her health and feeding.

Einstein’s first job offer — Einstein graduated from university in 1900, but had great difficulty finding academic employment. He received this notice of his appointment as a technical clerk at the Swiss Patent Office in June 1902 and would later describe his time there as happy and productive.

“On the Electrodynamics of Moving Bodies” — Einstein’s 1905 paper on the special theory of relativity is a landmark in the development of modern physics.

“On a Heuristic Point of View Concerning the Production and Transformation of Light” — Einstein received the Nobel Prize in Physics for this paper on the hypothesis of energy quanta.

The telegram informing that Einstein he has won the Nobel Prize — Einstein was traveling in the Far East when he officially learned via telegram that he had been awarded the prize. However, he had long been expecting the prize, as evidenced by a clause regarding its disposition in a preliminary divorce agreement from Mileva in 1918.

“The Field Equations of Gravitation” — Einstein spent a decade developing the general theory of relativity and published this article in late 1915.

To his mother Pauline Einstein — Einstein writes to his ailing mother to share the happy news that his prediction of gravitational light bending was confirmed by a British eclipse expedition in 1919.

To Heinrich Zangger, on the mercurial nature of fame — Having been propelled to world fame, Einstein writes to his friend about the difficulties of being “worshipped today, scorned or even crucified tomorrow.”

To Max Planck, on receiving credible death threats — Einstein writes that he cannot attend the Scientist’s Convention in Berlin because he is “supposedly among the group of persons being targeted by nationalist assassins.”

Four Lectures on the Theory of Relativity, held at Princeton University in May 1921 — On his first trip to the United States, Einstein famously delivered these lectures on the theory of relativity.


About The Collected Papers of Albert Einstein
The Collected Papers of Albert Einstein is one of the most ambitious publishing ventures ever undertaken in the documentation of the history of science. Selected from among more than 40,000 documents contained in Einstein’s personal collection, and 15,000 Einstein and Einstein-related documents discovered by the editors since the beginning of the Einstein Project, The Collected Papers provides the first complete picture of a massive written legacy. When completed, the series will contain more than 14,000 documents as full text and will fill thirty volumes. The volumes are published by Princeton University Press, sponsored by the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, and supported by the California Institute of Technology.
http://www.einstein.caltech.edu/

About Princeton University Press
Princeton University Press is an independent publisher with close connections, both formal and informal, to Princeton University. As such it has overlapping responsibilities to the University, the academic community, and the reading public. Our fundamental mission is to disseminate scholarship (through print and digital media) both within academia and to society at large.
http://press.princeton.edu | Twitter: @PrincetonUPress

About Tizra
Tizra’ digital publishing platform makes it easy to distribute and sell ebooks and other digital content directly to readers, with exceptional control over the user experience. Combining intuitive control panels with integrated ecommerce, SEO, mobile, multimedia, and content remixing capabilities, Tizra empowers content owners to respond quickly to market feedback and build audience relationships that will hold up over the long haul. The company is headquartered in Providence, Rhode Island, and funded in part by Rhode Island’s Slater Technology Fund.
http://tizra.com  |  Twitter: @tizra

Media contacts:

In North America, Australia, & Asia:
Jessica Pellien
Phone: (609) 258-7879
Fax: (609) 258-1335
jessica_pellien@press.princeton.edu
In Europe, Africa, & the Middle East:
Julia Hall
Phone: 1993-814-900
Fax: 1993-814-504
julia_hall@press.princeton.edu

#AAUPWeek Seminar: Collaboration in Scholarly Publishing

 

About this program:

Collaborations spearheaded by university and academic presses with research libraries, scholars, and other universities around the world are a vital part of publishing today. It is these alliances that keep university presses at the forefront of literature, theory, research, and ideas, making them stewards of modern thought.

In this discussion, Jennifer Howard from The Chronicle of Higher Education is joined by three panelists who have spearheaded innovative collaborations that cross the boundaries of nations, institutions, and disciplines: Barbara Kline Pope, Executive Director for Communications at National Academies Press and also President of the AAUP, Peter Dougherty, Director of Princeton University Press, and Ron Chrisman, director of the University of North Texas Press.

The projects to be discussed are:
• Princeton University Press and Caltech’s Einstein Papers Project provides the first complete picture of Albert Einstein’s massive written legacy. http://www.einstein.caltech.edu
• National Academy Press’s Academy Scope is a visualization of all of the titles that are available on NAP.edu, allowing readers to browse through the reports of the National Academies by topic area and seeing relationships between titles. http://www.nap.edu/academy-scope
• University of North Texas Press teams up with the University of North Texas Sub-Antarctic Biocultural Conservation Program and the University of Magallanes in Chile to introduce Magellanic Sub-Antarctic Ornithology.  This project is the result of a decade of research conducted by scientist associated with the Omora Ethnobotanical Park in the Cape Horn Biosphere Reserve in Chile. https://untpress.unt.edu/catalog/3564

#UPWeek: Press Director Peter Dougherty participating in Collaboration in Scholarly Publishing today at 1 PM EST

Join the Association of American University Presses today, November 12, 2014, from 1pm-2pm ET, in celebrating scholarly presses by highlighting three exemplary collaborative projects in an online panel moderated by Jennifer Howard from The Chronicle of Higher Education.

The session will be presented on Google+: http://bit.ly/ZUCKr1

Ms. Howard will be joined by Barbara Kline Pope, Executive Director for Communications at National Academies Press and AAUP President, Peter Dougherty, Director of Princeton University Press, and Ron Chrisman, Director of the University of North Texas Press to discuss the projects they spearheaded for their respective presses. These three projects illustrate some of the best work being produced in publishing today and open the door to talk about other collaborations within science and the humanities.

  • Princeton University Press and Caltech’s Einstein Papers Project provides the first complete picture of Albert Einstein’s massive written legacy.
  • National Academies Press’s Academy Scope is a visualization of all of the reports that are available on NAP.edu, allowing readers to browse through the reports of the National Academies by topic area and seeing relationships between titles.
  • University of North Texas Press, University of North Texas Sub-Antarctic Biocultural Conservation Program, and University of Magallanes in Chile’s Magellanic Sub-Antarctic Ornithology project is the result of a decade of research conducted by scientists associated with the Omora Ethnobotanical Park in the Cape Horn Biosphere Reserve in Chile.

 

November 12, 2014, 1pm-2pm ET

Collaboration in Scholarly Publishing

Presented on Google+

http://bit.ly/ZUCKr1

#UPWeek

American Pulp — so much more than cheap books

rabinowitz

Ron Slate reviews American Pulp by Paula Rabinowitz (seen above with part of her collection of pulp paperbacks at the Twin Cities Book Festival on October 11, 2014) at his blog On the Seawall:

Rabinowitz devotes chapters to the exposure of GI’s to paperbacks, the scandalous novels of Ann Petry (the racial, ethnic, and sexual obsessions of small-town white America), Borges and pulps, “uncovering lesbian pulp,” the portrayals of the Holocaust and the new age of The Bomb, and censorship. She writes with briskness and acuity. The historical richness of the material is leavened by a lively, broadminded, and humane sense of her culture. But most important, she writes with affection for the profound effects of her subject. Her own early responses to the genre are palpable: “The paperback, indeed, literature tout court, is suffused with desire and love, of and for sisters and parents, imagined lovers, real boyfriends. It is a token and expression of what cannot be contained, a tangible object that, in its totality, offers entrance into the infinitude of time and memory and all one might want collapsed into the hours spent alone with it.”

Read more: http://www.ronslate.com/new_titles_ren_char_paula_rabinowitz_and_alexander_kluge


bookjacket American Pulp
How Paperbacks Brought Modernism to Main Street
Paula Rabinowitz

The Future Library Project 2114

Yes, you read that right, the year is 2114 and perhaps one of our authors will be invited to participate–who knows?

The Future Library intends to gather 100 major writings from 100 influential writers over the next 100 years to create a “library” of books. Margaret Atwood is the first of 100 writers who will each contribute a text, and she has already begun writing. She plans to complete the book in May 2015, but then the manuscript will be held unread for 100 years, until the final publication of the anthology of texts in 2114. The coordinators of the Future Library also intend to grow the trees upon which the anthology will eventually be printed (good to know they are optimistic about the prospect of print and paper books in the 22nd century!).

The first writer to contribute to Katie Paterson’s Future Library – a new public artwork that will unfold in the city of Oslo, Norway over the next 100 years – is prizewinning author, poet, essayist and environmentalist Margaret Atwood.

Atwood is the first of 100 writers who will each contribute a text to Future Library over the next 100 years. The Canadian author has begun to write her text, which she will gift to Future Library in May 2015, whereupon it will be held unread for 100 years, until the final publication of the anthology of texts in 2114. A thousand trees have been planted in Nordmarka, a forest just outside Oslo. In 2114, the trees will be cut down to provide the paper for the anthology of books. Visitors to the forest can experience the slow growth of the trees, inch-by-inch, year-by-year.

Conceived by Katie Paterson, Future Library is produced by Situations as part of Slow Space, a public art programme for Bjørvika, commissioned by Bjørvika Utvikling and managed by the Future Library Trust. Supported by the City of Oslo, Agency for Cultural Affairs and Agency for Urban Environment.

Details here: http://www.situations.org.uk/margaret-atwood-first-writer-contribute-future-library/

 

In this video, Future Library visionary Katie Paterson speaks with Margaret Atwood:

Margaret Atwood – the first writer for Future Library from Katie Paterson on Vimeo.

I hope my great (or is that great-great?) grandchildren are as appreciative upon the completion of this innovative publishing project as I am at the start.

Princeton University Press Launches Princeton Legacy Library

Princeton University Press Launches Princeton Legacy Library

More than 3,000 Out-of-Print Books from Its Celebrated Backlist will become available through Ingram Content Group

Princeton Legacy Library Web site: http://press.princeton.edu/princeton-legacy-library

On Monday, July 14, 2014, Princeton University Press will introduce the Princeton Legacy Library (PLL), its newly digitized out-of-print backlist. The PLL will make Princeton’s backlist titles available digitally through Ingram Content Group in both print-on-demand editions and as ebooks for libraries and scholarly institutions through leading library aggregators.

According to Press Director Peter J. Dougherty, “By digitizing our backlist in the Princeton Legacy Library, the Press has used the latest technology to make our past publications readily available to readers all over the world. Researchers and students in many developing countries will have access to our historical titles for the first time ever.”

On July 14, over 1,200 titles will be released in the Princeton Legacy Library with subsequent batches planned through 2016, moving backward through Princeton University Press’s vaunted publishing history. Books included in the first installment will cover the years from approximately 1980 to 2000. When completed, the program will include over 3,000 titles. Notable titles this year include George Kennan’s Russia Leaves the War. Volume 1 of Soviet-American Relations(1986), John Wheeler’s edited Quantum Theory and Measurement (1983), Gladys Reichard’s Navaho Religion (1963), Sandra Zimdars-Swartz’s Encountering Mary: From La Salette to Medjugorje (1991), and John Polkinghorne’s The Faith of a Physicist: Reflections on a Bottom-Up Thinker (1994).

“It’s gratifying to know that our work and innovation at Ingram Content Group is making a program such as the Princeton Legacy Library possible,” said John Ingram, Ingram Content Group’s Chairman and CEO, and ’83 graduate of Princeton University. “Reviving out-of-print works so they continue to be resources for learning is one of the many ways we are using new technology to improve accessibility and availability of reading material on a global scale. On many levels, I’m pleased that Ingram is partnering with Princeton University Press to support their pursuit to provide scholarly content to learners around the world.”

“This project has been made possible in large part by advances in digital technology,” according to Assistant Director and Director of Marketing Adam Fortgang, who noted, “Over the past few years, the Press has seen a significant increase in demand for our out-of-print books and, with the advent of improved scanning technology, we felt we could fulfill our scholarly mission by making high-quality digital editions of these books available once again.”

Produced using the latest print-on-demand technology, these paperback editions preserve the original texts of these important books and present them in durable and affordable volumes for new generations of readers.

Working closely with Ingram, the Press developed a system to automate the creation of paperback covers to give the Princeton Legacy Library a standard look and format. The cover designs were created by Tom Geismar of the distinguished graphic design firm, Chermayeff & Geismar & Haviv. All books in the Library will be available digitally for libraries and institutions. Initially, the ebook versions will not be available via retailers until sufficient demand warrants additional conversions.

In keeping with the fundamental mission of Princeton University Press, the Princeton Legacy Library continues the Press’s commitment, “to disseminating the highest quality scholarship (through print and digital media) both within academia and to society at large. Princeton University Press seeks to publish the innovative works of the greatest minds in academia, from the most respected senior scholar to the extraordinarily promising graduate student, in each of the disciplines in which we publish.”

 

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The Marginalia Review of Books announces the “Lives of Great Religious Books Essay Competition”

From The Marginalia Review of Books web site:

Essay-Competition

The Marginalia Review of Books announces the “Lives of Great Religious Books Essay Competition.” We invite essay submissions of up to 3,000 words related to the theme of the reception of religious books, broadly conceived. Those interested should read past essays to ensure their submissions correspond to MRB‘s style. The eminent philosopher Roger Scruton will join the MRB editors to judge the competition. The winner will receive Princeton University Press’s entire Lives of Great Religious Books series, and we will consider all submissions for publication in early 2015.

The competition closes on November 1 and the winner will be announced in January 2015.

For details on how to submit an essay for consideration, please visit The Marginalia Review of Books web site.

About the Lives of Great Religious Books series:

Lives of Great Religious Books is a new series of short volumes that recount the complex and fascinating histories of important religious texts from around the world. Written for general readers by leading authors and experts, these books examine the historical origins of texts from the great religious traditions, and trace how their reception, interpretation, and influence have changed–often radically–over time. As these stories of translation, adaptation, appropriation, and inspiration dramatically remind us, all great religious books are living things whose careers in the world can take the most unexpected turns.

Carlin Romano called the series “innovative,” in his earlier article for The Chronicle of Higher Education and Bruce Elder, writing for The Sydney Morning Herald praised the series as an “inspired publishing idea.”

For a list of the books currently available in the series, please click here.

To see the list of forthcoming volumes, please click here.

 

Princeton University Press wins big at the 2014 PROSE Awards

American_PROSE_awards_logo[1] The Professional and Scholarly Publishing (PSP) Division of the Association of American Publishers (AAP) announced the 2013 PROSE Award Winners yesterday at the PSP Annual Conference in Washington, D.C.  According to the PROSE press release, the 2013 PROSE Awards received a record-breaking 535 entries—more than ever before in its 38-year history—in more than 40 categories. For full information about the 2013 PROSE Award winners: http://www.proseawards.com/current-winners.html

Princeton University Press won top awards in 3 Book Subject Categories, and received 11 Honorable Mention awards—a total of 14 awards. We are so happy to congratulate our authors:

 

3 Category Award Winners

Robert Bartlett, Why Can the Dead Do Such Great Things?
Winner of the 2013 PROSE Award in European and World History, Association of American Publishers

Thomas G. Pavel, The Lives of the Novel
Winner of the 2013 PROSE Award in Literature, Association of American Publishers

Anat Admati and Martin Hellwig, The Bankers’ New Clothes
Winner of the 2013 PROSE Award in Business, Finance & Management, Association of American Publishers

 

11 Honorable Mention Winners

S. Frederick Starr, Lost Enlightenment
Honorable Mention for the 2013 PROSE Award in European and World History, Association of American Publishers

John Sides and Lynn Vavreck, The Gamble
Honorable Mention for the 2013 PROSE Award in Government & Politics, Association of American Publishers

Ruth R. Wisse, No Joke
Honorable Mention for the 2013 PROSE Award in Language & Linguistics, Association of American Publishers

W. Bernard Carlson, Tesla
Honorable Mention for the 2013 PROSE Award in Biography & Autobiography, Association of American Publishers

Jeremy Adelman, Worldly Philosopher
Honorable Mention for the 2013 PROSE Award in Biography & Autobiography, Association of American Publishers

Katrina van Grouw, The Unfeathered Bird
Honorable Mention for the 2013 PROSE Award in Biological Sciences, Association of American Publishers

Lance Fortnow, The Golden Ticket
Honorable Mention for the 2013 PROSE Award in Popular Science & Mathematics, Association of American Publishers

Jeremiah P. Ostriker and Simon Mitton, Heart of Darkness
Honorable Mention for the 2013 PROSE Award in Cosmology & Astronomy, Association of American Publishers

Tom Stephenson and Scott Whittle, The Warbler Guide
Honorable Mention for the 2013 PROSE Award in Single Volume Reference/Science, Association of American Publishers

Angus Deaton, The Great Escape
Honorable Mention for the 2013 PROSE Award in Economics, Association of American Publishers

William B. Helmreich, The New York Nobody Knows
Honorable Mention for the 2013 PROSE Award in Sociology & Social Work, Association of American Publishers

What happens at AAR/SBL doesn’t stay at AAR/SBL…

Prompted by this great meeting overview in Publishers Weekly, I asked our religion editor Fred Appel what his experience was like at the American Academy of Religion and Society of Biblical Literature conference. Here’s how he describes the meeting:

photo

Princeton University Press religion editor Fred Appel with Sharmila Sen and Jennifer Banks, religion editors of Harvard University Press and Yale University Press, respectively.

The joint meeting of the American Academy of Religion and Society of Biblical Literature is one of North America’s biggest academic conferences. Almost 11,000 scholars attended last month’s meeting at the Baltimore Convention Center. The meetings are noted for their diversity. All manner of religion scholars attend, from specialists of the Hebrew Bible and Qur’an, to experts in Zen Buddhism, Christian monasticism and Hinduism, to historians of American religion. The exhibit hall is filled with all sorts of publishers, including many with avowedly religious/confessional commitments. Publishers from the world of scholarly book publishing were also there in force.

Among PUP’s strong sellers at this meeting were recent volumes in the “Lives of Great Religious Books” series, especially Mark Larrimore’s book on Job and John Collins on the Dead Sea Scrolls. Also quite popular was The Bible in Arabic, a scholarly book tracing this history of early translations of the Bible in the Arab world by Sidney Griffith of Catholic University. Our two big religion reference books (The Princeton Dictionary of Buddhism and A History of Jewish-Muslim Relations) this season also attracted considerable attention, and we had one social science title that performed very well too: Mark Chaves’ American Religion.

Poet, Critic Susan Stewart to Lead Princeton Series of Contemporary Poets

Stewart_Love Lessons_AUphotoPrinceton University Press is pleased to announce that the poet and MacArthur Fellow Susan Stewart will be the new editor for its Princeton Series of Contemporary Poets. She succeeds Paul Muldoon, Pulitzer Prize-winning poet and New Yorker poetry editor.

Stewart, who also has had a distinguished career as a critic and translator, is currently the Avalon Foundation University Professor in the Humanities: Professor of English at Princeton University where she teaches aesthetics, poetics, and the history of poetry and directs the Society of Fellows in the Liberal Arts. Stewart is a past chancellor of the Academy of American Poets, a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the recipient of an Academy Award in Literature from the American Academy of Arts and Letters.

On her appointment, Susan Stewart said: “At this moment, when American poets have taken so many new directions in their individual poems and the shapes of their books of poems, I look forward to considering a wide range of submissions, from new and established poets alike. The series will, I hope, feature volumes notable for their originality and considered sense of form.”

Princeton Humanities Publisher Rob Tempio said: “Everyone at Princeton University Press is thrilled and honored that Susan has agreed to succeed Paul Muldoon as editor of the Contemporary Poets series. She is a brilliant poet, scholar and critic who is perfectly poised to identify and foster compelling and original voices from all areas of contemporary poetry.”

Stewart will serve for a three year term. Submissions of complete manuscripts for the series may be sent to the Press between the dates of May 1st and May 31st each year and Stewart will announce selections each September.

Princeton University Press published Stewart’s first book of poems Yellow Stars and Ice as part of the Princeton Series of Contemporary Poets in 1981 and also published her translation Love Lessons: Selected Poems of Alda Merini in 2009. Her volumes of poetry include The Hive, The Forest, Red Rover, and Columbarium, which won the 2003 National Book Critics Circle Award.

Through the Princeton Series of Contemporary Poets, the Princeton University Press is dedicated to publishing the best work of today’s emerging and established poets. Starting in 1975 with the publication of Sadness and Happiness: Poems by Robert Pinsky, the series quickly distinguished itself as one of the most important publishing projects of its kind, winning praise from critics and poets alike. Other publications in the series include landmark collections such as Before Recollection (1987) by Ann Lauterbach, Hybrids of Plants and of Ghosts (1980) and Erosion (1983) by Jorie Graham, The Eternal City: Poems (2010) by Kathleen Graber, and Almanac: Poems (2013) by Austin Smith.

Media Inquiries:
Casey LaVela
casey_lavela@press.princeton.edu
609.258.9491

Day 5 of #UPWeek is finally here — the global reach of university presses

upweekToday is the last day of the University Press Week Blog Tour and it’s finally our turn! Today Peter Dougherty considers the importance of finding foreign language publishers to translate and publish UP-generated works. We are joined by a raft of other publishers considering the various ways university presses are expanding the global reach of the scholarship we publish.


Columbia University Press
www.cupblog.org
Georgetown University Press
georgetownuniversitypress.tumblr.com

Discusses how Georgetown University Press gives its readers the tools they need to have a global reach themselves through our foreign language learning materials, our international career guides, and our international affairs titles.

Indiana University Press
iupress.typepad.com
IUP presents an overview of their Mellon-funded Framing the Global project which will develop and disseminate new knowledge, approaches, and methods in the field of global research.
Johns Hopkins University Press
jhupressblog.com

From book translations to international marketing and the growth of Project MUSE into many different nations, the JHU Press can’t help but think beyond the borders of the United States.

New York University Press
fromthesquare.org
Chip Rossetti, managing editor of the Library of Arabic Literature (LAL), will discuss the new LAL series, an ambitious international project which comes out of a partnership between NYU Press and NYU Abu Dhabi.
Princeton University Press
press.princeton.edu/blog
Peter Dougherty, Press Director, writes about the importance of foreign language translations to the future of university press economic health and fulfillment of our missions.
University of Wisconsin Press
uwpress.wordpress.com

Press director Sheila Leary profiles the publishing career of Jan Vansina, one of the founders of the field of African history (rather than colonial history). His innovative seven books with the University of Wisconsin Press from the 1960s to the present have continually broken new ground, influencing the historiography of Africa and several related disciplines.

Yale University Press
blog.yupnet.org

Ivan Lett writes on recent transatlantic collaboration of US-UK marketing initiatives for Yale University Press globally published titles, series, and digital products.

The complete schedule for the blog tour is located here.