George Akerlof and Robert Shiller pose with their new book jacket

Nobel Prize winners Robert Shiller and George Akerlof got the chance to pose with the phenomenal cover for their forthcoming book, Phishing for Phools, the lead title on our Fall 2015 list (stay tuned for the posting of our new seasonal catalog!)  The drawing on the cover is an original by New Yorker cartoonist Edward Koren, and the jacket design is by our own Jason Alejandro. You can catch George talking about the book, which is a fascinating look at the central role of manipulation in economics, at this lecture at Duke University.

Akerloff and Shiller

 

Lawrence Stone Lectures with Chris Clark this April

At the end of April, Chris Clark of St. Catharine’s College, University of Cambridge, and author of the international bestseller The Sleepwalkers, is giving the Lawrence Stone Lectures, jointly sponsored by the Princeton History Department’s Shelby Cullom Davis Center and Princeton University Press. The lectures are on Power and Historicity in Germany, 1648-1945. They are open to the public and held at 4:30 pm, 010 E. Pyne, with a reception to follow.

On Tuesday, April 28, “The State Makes History”

On Wednesday, April 29, “The State Confronts History”

On Thursday, April 30, “Nazi Time: The Escape from History”

Check the Davis Center’s website for more information on this lecture series.

Lawrence Stone Lectures

 

Pi Day Recipe: Apple Pie from Jim Henle’s The Proof and the Pudding

Tomorrow (March 14, 2015) is a very important Pi Day. This year’s local Princeton Pi Day Party and other global celebrations of Albert Einstein’s birthday look to be truly stellar, which is apt given this is arguably the closest we will get to 3.1415 in our lifetimes.

Leading up to the publication of the forthcoming The Proof and the Pudding: What Mathematicians, Cooks, and You Have in Common by Jim Henle, we’re celebrating the holiday with a recipe for a classic Apple Pie (an integral part of any Pi Day spread). Publicist Casey LaVela recreates and photographs the recipe below. Full text of the recipe follows. Happy Pi Day everyone!


Notes on Jim Henle’s Apple Pie recipe from Publicist Casey LaVela

The Proof and the Pudding includes several recipes for pies or tarts that would fit the bill for Pi Day, but the story behind Henle’s Apple Pie recipe is especially charming, the recipe itself is straightforward, and the results are delicious. At the author’s suggestion, I used a mixture of baking apples (and delightfully indulgent amounts of butter and sugar).

Crust:

All of the crust ingredients (flour, butter, salt) ready to go:

_IGP2734

After a few minutes of blending everything together with a pastry cutter, the crust begins to come together. A glorious marriage of flour and butter.

_IGP2742

Once the butter and flour were better incorporated, I dribbled in the ice water and then turned the whole wonderful mess out between two sheets of plastic wrap in preparation for folding. The crust will look like it won’t come together, but somehow it always does in the end. Magical.

_IGP2758

Now you need to roll out and fold over the dough a few times. This is an important step and makes for a light and flaky crust. (You use a similar process to make croissants or other viennoiserie from scratch.)

_IGP2765

I cut the crust into two (for the top crust and bottom crust) using my handy bench scraper:

_IGP2780

Apples:

The apples cored, peeled, and ready to be cut into slices. I broke out my mandolin slicer (not pictured) to make more even slices, but if you don’t own a slicer or prefer to practice your knife skills you can just as easily use your favorite sharp knife.

_IGP2749

Beautiful (even) apple slices:

_IGP2788

Action shot of me mixing the apple slices, sugar, and cinnamon together. I prefer to prepare my apple pie filling in a bowl rather than sprinkling the dry ingredients over the apple slices once they have been arranged in the bottom crust. I’m not sure if it has much impact on the flavor and it is much, much messier, but I find it more fun.

_IGP2797

Assembly:

The bottom crust in the pie plate:

_IGP2784

Arrange the apple slices in the bottom crust:

_IGP2804

Top with the second crust, seal the top crust to the bottom with your fingers, and (using your sharp knife) make incisions in the top crust to allow steam to escape:

_IGP2830

The apple pie before going into the oven (don’t forget to put a little extra sugar on top):

_IGP2847

The finished product:

_IGP2851

There was a little crust left over after cutting, so I shaped it into another pi symbol, covered it in cinnamon and sugar, and baked it until golden brown. I ate the baked pi symbol as soon as it had cooled (before thinking to take a picture), but it was delicious!

_IGP2848


Apple Pie

The story of why I started cooking is not inspiring. My motives weren’t pure. Indeed, they involved several important sins.

I really am a glutton. I love to eat. As a child, I ate well; my mother was a wonderful cook. But I always wanted more than I got, especially dessert. And of all desserts, it was apple pie I craved most. Not diner pies, not restaurant pies, and not bakery pies, but real, homemade apple pies.

When I was six, I had my first homemade apple pie. It was at my grandmother’s house. I don’t remember how it tasted, but I can still recall the gleam in my mother’s eye when she explained the secret of the pie. “I watched her make it. Before she put on the top crust, she dotted the whole thing with big pats of butter!”

Several times as I was growing up, my mother made apple pie. Each one was a gem. But they were too few—only three or four before I went off to college. They were amazing pies. The apples were tart and sweet. Fresh fall apples, so flavorful no cinnamon was needed. The crust was golden, light and crisp, dry when it first hit the tongue, then dissolving into butter.

I grew up. I got married. I started a family. All the while, I longed for that pie. Eventually I set out to make one.

Success came pretty quickly, and it’s not hard to see why. The fact is, despite apple pie’s storied place in American culture, most apple pies sold in this country are abysmal. A pie of fresh, tart apples and a crust homemade with butter or lard, no matter how badly it’s made, is guaranteed to surpass a commercial product.

That means that even if you’ve never made a pie before, you can’t go seriously wrong. The chief difficulty is the crust, but I’ve developed a reliable method. Except for this method, the recipe below is standard.

For the filling:
5 cooking apples (yielding about 5 cups of pieces)
1/4 to 1/3 cup sugar
2 Tb butter
1/2 to 1 tsp cinnamon
lemon juice, if necessary
1 tsp flour, maybe

For the crust:
2 cups flour
1 tsp salt
2/3 cup lard or unsalted butter (1 1/3 sticks)
water

The crust is crucial. I’ll discuss its preparation last. Assume for now that you’ve rolled out the bottom crust and placed it in the pie pan.

Core, peel, and slice the apples. Place them in the crust. Sprinkle with sugar and cinnamon. Dot with butter. Roll out the top crust and place it on top. Seal the edge however you like. In about six places, jab a knife into the crust and twist to leave a hole for steam to escape. Sprinkle the crust with the teaspoon of sugar.

Bake in a preheated oven for 15 minutes at 450° and then another 35 minutes at 350°. Allow to cool. Serve, if you like, with vanilla ice cream or a good aged cheddar.

Now, the crust:

Mix the flour and salt in a large bowl. Place the lard or butter or lard/butter in the bowl. Cut it in with a pastry cutter.

Next, the water. Turn the cold water on in the kitchen sink so that it dribbles out in a tiny trickle. Hold the bowl with the flour mixture in one hand and a knife in the other. Let the water dribble into the bowl while you stir with the knife. The object is to add just enough water so that the dough is transformed into small dusty lumps. Don’t be vigorous with the knife, but don’t allow the water to pool. If the water is dribbling too fast, take the bowl away from the faucet from time to time. When you’re done, the dough will still look pretty dry.

Recipes usually call for about 5 tablespoons of water. This method probably uses about that much.

Actually, the dough will look so dry that you’ll think it won’t stick together when it’s rolled out. In fact, it probably won’t stick together, but trust me. This is going to work.

Tear off a sheet of plastic wrap and lay it on the counter. Place a bit more than half the dough on the sheet and cover it with a second sheet of plastic.

With a rolling pin, roll the dough out between the two sheets. Roll it roughly in the shape of a rectangle.

It won’t look great and it probably would fall apart if you picked it up.

Don’t pick it up. Remove the top sheet of plastic wrap and fold the bottom third up, and fold the top third down, then do the same horizontally, right and left.

Now replace the top sheet of plastic wrap and roll the dough out gently into a disk.

This time it should look pretty decent. This time the dough will stick together.

You should be able to remove the top sheet of plastic and, using the bottom sheet, turn it over into the pie pan. The crust should settle in nicely without breaking.

Form the top crust the same way.

This method rolls each crust twice—usually not a good idea because working the dough makes it tough. But remarkably, crusts produced this way are tender and light. I’m not sure why but I suspect it’s because the dough is fairly dry.

Notes:
• Cooking apples are tart apples. The best I know is the Rhode Island Greening, but they’re hard to find. Baldwins and Jonathans are decent, but they’re hard to find too. The British Bramleys are terrific. I’ve made good pies from the French Calville Blanc d’Hiver. But we’re not living in good apple times. Most stores don’t sell apples for cooking. When in doubt, use a mixture.
• The lemon juice and the larger quantity of cinnamon are for when you have tired apples with no oomph. The cheese also serves this purpose. It should be a respectable old cheddar and it should be at room temperature.
• Consumption of too many commercial pies makes me loath to add flour or cornstarch to pie filling. The flour is here in case you fear your apples will be too juicy. I don’t mind juice in a pie, in moderation. If adding flour, mix the apples, sugar, cinnamon, and flour in a bowl before pouring into the crust.
• Lard is best. Its melting point is higher than butter’s. It successfully separates the flour into layers for a light, crispy crust. Butter is more likely to saturate the flour and produce a heavy crust. Some like half butter/half lard, preferring butter for its flavor. But the flavor of lard is nice too, and its porkiness is wonderful with apple.


This recipe is taken from:

Henle_TheProof_S15

The Proof and the Pudding

What Mathematicians, Cooks, and You Have in Common

Jim Henle

“If you’re a fan of Julia Child or Martin Gardner—who respectively proved that anyone can have fun preparing fancy food and doing real mathematics—you’ll enjoy this playful yet passionate romp from Jim Henle. It’s stuffed with tasty treats and ingenious ideas for further explorations, both in the kitchen and with pencil and paper, and draws many thought-providing parallels between two fields not often considered in the same mouthful.”—Colm Mulcahy, author of Mathematical Card Magic: Fifty-Two New Effects

Watch Diana Buchwald, editor of The Collected Papers of Albert Einstein, introduce The Digital Einstein Papers

Explore The Digital Einstein Papers for yourself: http://einsteinpapers.press.princeton.edu


Produced in association with Caltech Academic Media Technologies. © 2014 California Institute of Technology

Princeton University Press launches The Digital Einstein Papers

DEP front page

Launching today, THE DIGITAL EINSTEIN PAPERS is a publicly available website of the collected and translated papers of Albert Einstein that allows readers to explore the writings of the world’s most famous scientist as never before.

Princeton, NJ – December 5, 2014 – Princeton University Press, in partnership with Tizra, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, and California Institute of Technology, announces the launch of THE DIGITAL EINSTEIN PAPERS (http://einsteinpapers.press.princeton.edu). This unique, authoritative resource provides full public access to the translated and annotated writings of the most influential scientist of the twentieth century: Albert Einstein.

“Princeton University Press has a long history of publishing books by and about Albert Einstein, including the incredible work found in The Collected Papers of Albert Einstein,” said Peter Dougherty, director of Princeton University Press. “We are delighted to make these texts openly available to a global audience of researchers, scientists, historians, and students keen to learn more about Albert Einstein. This project not only furthers the mission of the press to publish works that contribute to discussions that have the power to change our world, but also illustrates our commitment to pursuing excellence in all forms of publishing—print and digital.”

THE DIGITAL EINSTEIN PAPERS website presents the complete contents of The Collected Papers of Albert Einstein, and, upon its launch, the website—http://einsteinpapers.press.princeton.edu—will contain 5,000 documents covering the first forty-four years of Einstein’s life, up to and including the award of the Nobel Prize in Physics and his long voyage to the Far East. Additional material will be available on the website approximately eighteen months after the print publication of new volumes of The Collected Papers. Eventually, the website will provide access to all of Einstein’s writings and correspondence, accompanied by scholarly annotation and apparatus.

What sorts of gems will users discover in THE DIGITAL EINSTEIN PAPERS? According to Diana L. Kormos-Buchwald, director of the Einstein Papers Project, “This material has been carefully researched and annotated over the last twenty-five years and contains all of Einstein’s scientific and popular writings, drafts, lecture notes, and diaries, and his professional and personal correspondence up to his forty-fourth birthday—so users will discover major scientific articles on the general theory of relativity, gravitation, and quantum theory alongside his love letters to his first wife, correspondence with his children, and his intense exchanges with other notable scientists, philosophers, mathematicians, and political personalities of the early twentieth century.”

Buchwald also noted that THE DIGITAL EINSTEIN PAPERS will introduce current and future generations to important ideas and moments in history, saying, “It is exciting to think that thanks to the careful application of new technology, this work will now reach a much broader audience and stand as the authoritative digital source for Einstein’s written legacy.”

THE DIGITAL EINSTEIN PAPERS enables readers to experience the writings of Albert Einstein in unprecedented ways. Advance search technology improves discoverability by allowing users to perform keyword searches across volumes of Einstein’s writing and, with a single click, navigate between the original languages in which the texts were written and their English translations. Further exploration is encouraged by extensive explanatory footnotes, introductory essays, and links to the Einstein Archives Online, where there are thousands of high-quality digital images of Einstein’s writings.

The Tizra platform was selected for this project, according to Kenneth Reed, manager of digital production for Princeton University Press, because of its highly flexible, open, and intuitive content delivery approach, and its strong reputation for reliability. Equally important was creating a user-friendly reading experience.

“One of the reasons we chose Tizra is that we wanted to preserve the look and feel of the volumes,” said Reed. “You’ll see the pages as they appear in the print volumes, with added functionality such as linking between the documentary edition and translation, as well as linking to the Einstein Archives Online, and the ability to search across all the volumes in English and German.”

THE DIGITAL EINSTEIN PAPERS is an unprecedented scholarly collaboration that highlights what is possible when technology, important content, and a commitment to global scholarly communication are brought together. We hope you will join us in celebrating this achievement and invite you to explore Einstein’s writings with the links below.

Work on THE DIGITAL EINSTEIN PAPERS was supported by the Harold W. McGraw, Jr. endowment, the California Institute of Technology, the National Science Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Arcadia Fund, U.K.

A Sampling of Documents Found in THE DIGITAL EINSTEIN PAPERS

Website: http://einsteinpapers.press.princeton.edu

“My Projects for the Future” — In this high school French essay, a seventeen-year-old Einstein describes his future plans, writing that “young people especially like to contemplate bold projects.”

Letter to Mileva Marić — The first volume of The Collected Papers of Albert Einstein revealed that the young Einstein had fathered an illegitimate daughter. In this letter to his sweetheart and future wife, Einstein, age twenty-two, expresses his happiness at the birth of his daughter Lieserl, and asks about her health and feeding.

Einstein’s first job offer — Einstein graduated from university in 1900, but had great difficulty finding academic employment. He received this notice of his appointment as a technical clerk at the Swiss Patent Office in June 1902 and would later describe his time there as happy and productive.

“On the Electrodynamics of Moving Bodies” — Einstein’s 1905 paper on the special theory of relativity is a landmark in the development of modern physics.

“On a Heuristic Point of View Concerning the Production and Transformation of Light” — Einstein received the Nobel Prize in Physics for this paper on the hypothesis of energy quanta.

The telegram informing that Einstein he has won the Nobel Prize — Einstein was traveling in the Far East when he officially learned via telegram that he had been awarded the prize. However, he had long been expecting the prize, as evidenced by a clause regarding its disposition in a preliminary divorce agreement from Mileva in 1918.

“The Field Equations of Gravitation” — Einstein spent a decade developing the general theory of relativity and published this article in late 1915.

To his mother Pauline Einstein — Einstein writes to his ailing mother to share the happy news that his prediction of gravitational light bending was confirmed by a British eclipse expedition in 1919.

To Heinrich Zangger, on the mercurial nature of fame — Having been propelled to world fame, Einstein writes to his friend about the difficulties of being “worshipped today, scorned or even crucified tomorrow.”

To Max Planck, on receiving credible death threats — Einstein writes that he cannot attend the Scientist’s Convention in Berlin because he is “supposedly among the group of persons being targeted by nationalist assassins.”

Four Lectures on the Theory of Relativity, held at Princeton University in May 1921 — On his first trip to the United States, Einstein famously delivered these lectures on the theory of relativity.


About The Collected Papers of Albert Einstein
The Collected Papers of Albert Einstein is one of the most ambitious publishing ventures ever undertaken in the documentation of the history of science. Selected from among more than 40,000 documents contained in Einstein’s personal collection, and 15,000 Einstein and Einstein-related documents discovered by the editors since the beginning of the Einstein Project, The Collected Papers provides the first complete picture of a massive written legacy. When completed, the series will contain more than 14,000 documents as full text and will fill thirty volumes. The volumes are published by Princeton University Press, sponsored by the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, and supported by the California Institute of Technology.
http://www.einstein.caltech.edu/

About Princeton University Press
Princeton University Press is an independent publisher with close connections, both formal and informal, to Princeton University. As such it has overlapping responsibilities to the University, the academic community, and the reading public. Our fundamental mission is to disseminate scholarship (through print and digital media) both within academia and to society at large.
http://press.princeton.edu | Twitter: @PrincetonUPress

About Tizra
Tizra’ digital publishing platform makes it easy to distribute and sell ebooks and other digital content directly to readers, with exceptional control over the user experience. Combining intuitive control panels with integrated ecommerce, SEO, mobile, multimedia, and content remixing capabilities, Tizra empowers content owners to respond quickly to market feedback and build audience relationships that will hold up over the long haul. The company is headquartered in Providence, Rhode Island, and funded in part by Rhode Island’s Slater Technology Fund.
http://tizra.com  |  Twitter: @tizra

Media contacts:

In North America, Australia, & Asia:
Jessica Pellien
Phone: (609) 258-7879
Fax: (609) 258-1335
jessica_pellien@press.princeton.edu
In Europe, Africa, & the Middle East:
Julia Hall
Phone: 1993-814-900
Fax: 1993-814-504
julia_hall@press.princeton.edu

#NewBooks from Princeton University Press

Books released during the week of October 27, 2014
Alan Turing: The Enigma: The Book That Inspired the Film <i>The Imitation Game</i><br>Andrew Hodges<br>With a foreword by Douglas Hofstadter and a new preface by the author Alan Turing: The Enigma:
The Book That Inspired the Film The Imitation Game
Andrew Hodges
With a foreword by Douglas Hofstadter and a new preface by the author


“One of the finest scientific biographies ever written.”–Jim Holt, New Yorker
Alan Turing's Systems of Logic: The Princeton Thesis<br>Edited and introduced by Andrew W. Appel Alan Turing’s Systems of Logic:
The Princeton Thesis
Edited and introduced by Andrew W. Appel


“This book presents the story of Turing’s work at Princeton University and includes a facsimile of his doctoral dissertation, ‘Systems of Logic Based on Ordinals,’ which he completed in 1936. The author includes a detailed history of Turing’s work in computer science and the attempts to ground the field in formal logic.”–Mathematics Teacher
One Hundred Semesters: My Adventures as Student, Professor, and University President, and What I Learned along the Way<br>William M. Chace One Hundred Semesters:
My Adventures as Student, Professor, and University President, and What I Learned along the Way
William M. Chace


“Chace here recounts a young man’s maturation and offers insight into the challenges of university administration. . . . Chace is a gifted storyteller, appealingly honest in analyzing what he did well and where he went wrong.”–Evelyn Beck, Library Journal
Birds of Australia: A Photographic Guide<br>Iain Campbell, Sam Woods & Nick Leseberg<br>With photography by Geoff Jones Birds of Australia:
A Photographic Guide
Iain Campbell, Sam Woods & Nick Leseberg
With photography by Geoff Jones


Birds of Australia is an excellent book. The text is comprehensive, the content is effectively organized and researched, and the scholarship is sound. The photographic plates are of a very high quality.”–Peter S. Lansley, senior ecologist, Brett Lane & Associates
The History of American Higher Education: Learning and Culture from the Founding to World War II<br>Roger L. Geiger The History of American Higher Education:
Learning and Culture from the Founding to World War II
Roger L. Geiger


“An encyclopedic history of American colleges and universities. . . . A well-researched, detailed tome.”–Kirkus Reviews

Princeton University Press’s #NewBooks for this week

Books released during the week of September 29, 2014
1989: The Struggle to Create Post-Cold War Europe<br>Mary Elise Sarotte<br><br />
With a new afterword by the author 1989:
The Struggle to Create Post-Cold War Europe
Mary Elise Sarotte
With a new afterword by the author


“Sarotte’s focus is on Germany. . . . [She] describes a host of competing conceptions of post-cold-war Europe that flourished, mutated and perished in the maelstrom of events that led up to German unity. . . . Two decades later . . . [t]here are still nuclear missiles aimed across the continent. It’s hard to imagine that it could have been otherwise–but, Sarotte shows us, it could have been.”–Paul Hockenos, New York Times Book Review
American Pulp: How Paperbacks Brought Modernism to Main Street<br>Paula Rabinowitz American Pulp:
How Paperbacks Brought Modernism to Main Street
Paula Rabinowitz


“Rabinowitz’s work is a prime example of literary scholarship and essential key to the history of American publishing.”–Publishers Weekly
Elliptic Tales: Curves, Counting, and Number Theory<br>Avner Ash & Robert Gross Elliptic Tales:
Curves, Counting, and Number Theory
Avner Ash & Robert Gross


“The authors present their discussion in an informal, sometimes playful manner and with detail that will appeal to an audience with a basic understanding of calculus. This book will captivate math enthusiasts as well as readers curious about an intriguing and still unanswered question.”–Margaret Dominy, Library Journal
The Original Folk and Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm:<br />
The Complete First Edition<br>Jacob & Wilhelm Grimm, Translated and edited by Jack Zipes<br><br />
Illustrated by Andrea Dezsö The Original Folk and Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm:
The Complete First Edition
Jacob & Wilhelm Grimm, Translated and edited by Jack Zipes
Illustrated by Andrea Dezsö


“A massive and brilliant accomplishment–the first English translation of the original Grimm brothers’ fairy tales. The plain telling is that much more forceful for its simplicity and directness, particularly in scenes of naked self-concern and brutality. Hate, spite, love, magic, all self-evident, heartbreaking, delightful. I will return to this book over and over, no doubt about it.”–Donna Jo Napoli, author of The Wager

Princeton University Press’s best-sellers for the last week

These are the best-selling books for the past week.

1177 BC: The Year Civilization Collapsed by Eric H. Cline
4-10 Drezner_TheoriesZombies_cvr Theories of International Politics and Zombies by Daniel W. Drezner
The 5 Elements of Effective Thinking by Edward B. Burger & Michael Starbird
The Founder’s Dilemmas: Anticipating and Avoiding the Pitfalls That Can Sink a Startup by Noam Wasserman
Bumble Bees of North America: An Identification Guide by Paul H. Williams, Robbin W. Thorp, Leif L. Richardson & Sheila R. Colla
OnBullshit On Bullshit by Harry G. Frankfurt
RoughCountry Rough Country: How Texas Became America’s Most Powerful Bible-Belt State by Robert Wuthnow
The Banker's New Clothes
The Bankers’ New Clothes: What’s Wrong with Banking and What to Do about It by Anat Admati and Martin Hellwig
Carlson_Tesla jacket
Tesla: Inventor of the Electrical Age by W. Bernard Carlson
The I Ching or Book of Changes edited by Hellmut Wilhelm

Hot off the Presses — Princeton University Press’s #NewBooks for this week

8-11 Art of DealArt of the Deal: Contemporary Art in a Global Financial Market
Noah Horowitz
With a new postscript by the author

“Art of the Deal is a crucial book on art and finance.”
–Blake Gopnik, Daily Beast

 

 

 

8-11 ConusConus of the Southeastern United States and Caribbean
Alan J. Kohn
Princeton Wild Guides

“World-class scholarship. This is a great book that takes readers on a scholarly grand tour from the earliest research history to the latest methodological approaches used to understand the biology and relationships of this intriguing group of gastropods. Kohn provides an amazing and unprecedented wealth of information.”–Rüdiger Bieler, coauthor of Seashells of Southern Florida

 

8-11 EntrepreneurialThe Entrepreneurial Group: Social Identities, Relations, and Collective Action
Martin Ruef

“Ruef explodes the myth of the lone entrepreneur, showing how those who start businesses assemble productive groups around themselves. He explains in a brilliant, original way how groups evolve into viable organizations and why some succeed while others fail. This is a must-read for anyone who wants to understand how entrepreneurs build businesses and why growing an enterprise is a team sport.”–Philip Anderson, INSEAD, director of the Rudolf and Valeria Maag International Centre for Entrepreneurship

 

8-11 Saved in AmericaGetting Saved in America: Taiwanese Immigration and Religious Experience
Carolyn Chen

“This book thus offers interesting points of view on the construction of identity and constitutes a good reference for understanding the family and religious traditions of the Taiwanese people: meaningful anecdotes, examples, and quotations, and a psychological approach.”–Hayet Sellami, China Perspectives

 

 

8-11 GoverningGoverning America: The Revival of Political History
Julian E. Zelizer

“Zelizer’s essays give the reader a good grasp of the ways that politics has unfolded over the past half century. And the range of topics gives a good sense of where the field lies at this point. The scholarship is impeccable, the sources appropriate, and the tone scholarly without being pedantic. As this collection of Zelizer’s finest work indicates, the discipline of history still has room for political history.”–John H. Barnhill, Canadian Journal of History

 

 

8-11 Moral DisquietMoral Disquiet and Human Life
Monique Canto-Sperber
Translated by Silvia Pavel

“[A]n extremely rich and wide-ranging work, written by one of the foremost contemporary moral philosophers in France. . . . Without at all sacrificing rigor, [Monique Canto-Sperber] demonstrates in a most resounding way that philosophy at its very best is plentiful in its resources to speak quite illuminatingly to the circumstances of life that agonize us so.”–Laurence Thomas, Ethics

 

 

8-11 presidential LeadershipPresidential Leadership and the Creation of the American Era
Joseph S. Nye, Jr.

“Sometimes the best presidential decisions are decisions not to act. This point is made in an excellent new book by Joseph Nye of Harvard University entitled Presidential Leadership and the Creation of the American Era.”–Gideon Rachman, Financial Times

 

 

 

8-11 TurthTruth
Alexis G. Burgess & John P. Burgess

Truth is remarkably succinct. . . . Yet it covers a great amount of ground with accessible discussions of a variety of topics. . . . [I]ntelligent and provocative.”–Michael P. Lynch, Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews

 

 

 

8-11 Black HoleWhat Does a Black Hole Look Like?
Charles D. Bailyn

“This book goes straight to the heart of astronomical intuition and evidence about black holes. Written in a highly accessible style, it provides enough information to educate an undergraduate astronomy or physics major without going into the many details required in a graduate class. I think students will greatly enjoy this book and derive significant insight from it.”–Coleman Miller, University of Maryland, College Park

 


Hot off the Presses — Princeton University Press’s #NewBooks for this week

8-6 Against SecurityAgainst Security: How We Go Wrong at Airports, Subways, and Other Sites of Ambiguous Danger
Harvey Molotch (With a new preface by the author)

“Mr. Molotch . . . present(s) a vivid picture of the ways in which poorly designed security measures can deform everyday life and defeat themselves.”–Jordan Ellenberg, Wall Street Journal

 

 

 

8-7 GarveyThe Age of Garvey: How a Jamaican Activist Created a Mass Movement and Changed Global Black Politics
Adam Ewing

“At last, an account of Garveyism worthy of its historic influence. Taking a unique approach to the twentieth century’s first black power movement, Ewing shows how Garveyism became a dynamic force in the politics of the interwar years. His superlative book bridges the genres of intellectual, social, and cultural history to serve as a model for the study of transnationalism.”–Vincent Brown, author of The Reaper’s Garden

 

 
8-7 Aristotle's EthicsAristotle’s Ethics: Writings from the Complete Works
Aristotle
Revised, edited, and with an introduction by Jonathan Barnes & Anthony Kenny

Reviews from The Complete Works of Aristotle: “This new edition makes a landmark of scholarship available in a very usable form.”–Library Journal

 

 

 

8-7 Atlas of CitiesAtlas of Cities
Edited by Paul Knox
With a foreword by Richard Florida

“This is an atlas with a difference. It broaches the complexity of the urban experience directly and in a beautifully persuasive graphical way, showing how this great variety of city types and features can be explained both chronologically and geographically. A wonderful book of new insights about how our contemporary cities have evolved.” –Michael Batty, author of The New Science of Cities

Sample this book: http://press.princeton.edu/chapters/i10307.pdf

8-7 Bee BookThe Bee: A Natural History
Noah Wilson-Rich
With contributions from Kelly Allin, Norman Carreck & Andrea Quigley
Earth is home to more than 20,000 bee species, from fluorescent-colored orchid bees and sweat bees to flower-nesting squash bees and leaf-cutter bees. This book takes an incomparable look at this astounding diversity, blending an engaging narrative with practical, hands-on discussions of such topics as beekeeping and bee health. It explores our relationship with the bee over evolutionary time, delving into how it came to be, where it stands today, and what the future holds for humanity and bees alike.

 

8-7 SlaveryBetween Slavery and Capitalism: The Legacy of Emancipation in the American South
Martin Ruef

“It would seem difficult to add any new knowledge to the history of the southern economy after the Civil War. But Martin Ruef has done just that. By arguing that the reconstruction of the southern economy was an uncertain and conflict-riven process, he suggests that the options that were pursued were a complex social construction that reflected the relative power of planters and their former slaves. Put simply, producing a labor market involved the construction of a new model of racial employment in the South. Ruef’s book uses previously unexploited data sources to examine the construction of this market from the bottom up and shows how this affected the life chances of African Americans for at least two generations.”–Neil D. Fligstein, University of California, Berkeley

8-7 Family ValuesFamily Values: The Ethics of Parent-Child Relationships
Harry Brighouse & Adam Swift

“Family Values is an important book on a neglected topic by two excellent scholars. It advances an original argument, and does so clearly and accessibly. Highly recommended.”–Stephen Macedo, Princeton University

 

 

 

8-7 GreenGreen: The History of a Color
Michel Pastoureau

“Beautifully illustrated.”–Daily Mail

 

 

8-7 Hidden ProcessesHidden Markov Processes: Theory and Applications to Biology
M. Vidyasagar

“This book provides a terrific introduction to an important and widely studied field–Markov processes (including hidden Markov processes)–with a particular view toward applications to problems in biology. With a wonderful balance of rigor, intuition, and choice of topics, the book gives a unique treatment of the subject for those interested in both fundamental theory and important applications.”–Sanjeev Kulkarni, Princeton University

 

 

 

8-7 OriginsThe Origins and History of Consciousness
Erich Neumann
With a foreword by C.G. Jung
Translated by R.F.C. Hull

“There can be no doubt that [Neumann] has brought to his task a remarkable . . . knowledge of classical mythology, some considerable acquaintance with the comparative study of religion, and a deep understanding of those psychological views and theories evolved by C. G. Jung.”–The Times Literary Supplement

 

 

8-7 ParadoxesParadoxes of Liberal Democracy: Islam, Western Europe, and the Danish Cartoon Crisis
Paul M. Sniderman, Michael Bang Petersen, Rune Slothuus & Rune Stubager

“Taking its starting point from the infamous Danish cartoon crisis and the clash of democratic values and Muslim fundamentalism that followed, this engagingly written, methodologically sophisticated, and creative study of public opinion adds substantially to a growing body of research into this ‘clash of civilizations’. The views of the Danish majority, far from scapegoating and vilifying the Muslim minority, distinguished carefully and intelligently between upholding the rights of this minority to live as Danish citizens while at the same time restricting freedoms for those associated with the threat of fundamentalist violence. This superb analysis of the nuances of public morality convincingly eschews simple answers to important and complex questions.”–Geoffrey Evans, University of Oxford

8-7 PenguinsPenguins: The Ultimate Guide
Tui De Roy, Mark Jones & Julie Cornthwaite

“The imagery in this book is incredible. Penguins is not only attractive and entertaining, but also an authoritative and easy-to-use reference. It is unlike any other book on the subject.”—Alvaro Jaramillo, author of Birds of Chile

 

 

8-7 EvangelicalThe Politics of Evangelical Identity: Local Churches and Partisan Divides in the United States and Canada
Lydia Bean

The Politics of Evangelical Identity is a bracing corrective to the perception of evangelicals as theological stooges mesmerized by the spell of conservative masterminds. Bean persuasively argues that the appeal of conservatives in the evangelical base has far more to do with how they connect the political to everyday spiritual and religious practices. Her path-clearing and transformative book brilliantly engages the political perspectives, moral passions, and religious beliefs of evangelicals from a practical, grounded perspective.”–Michael Eric Dyson, Georgetown University

 

8-7 ProfaneProfane Culture
Paul E. Willis
With a new preface by the author

A classic of British cultural studies, Profane Culture takes the reader into the worlds of two important 1960s youth cultures—the motor-bike boys and the hippies. Both groups were involved in an unequal but heroic fight to produce meaning and their own cultural forms in the face of a larger society dominated by the capitalist media and commercialism. They were pioneers of cultural experimentation, the self-construction of identity, and the curating of the self, which, in different ways, have become so widespread today.

Sample this book: http://press.princeton.edu/chapters/s10358.pdf

8-7 ReflectionA Reflection of Reality: Selected Readings in Contemporary Chinese Short Stories
Chih-p’ing Chou, Liping Yu & Joanne Chiang

“Chinese instruction is not only about teaching linguistic forms and their usages, but also about helping students obtain knowledge of Chinese culture and society. This timely book successfully achieves both of these goals by exposing students to literary works and language materials that are vivid and rich. A Reflection of Reality sets a model for teaching Chinese.”—Lening Liu, Columbia University

Sample this book: http://press.princeton.edu/chapters/s10387.pdf

8-7 Silent SexThe Silent Sex: Gender, Deliberation, and Institutions
Christopher F. Karpowitz & Tali Mendelberg

“This pathbreaking book brings us the latest research on why, in most public situations, women don’t speak up as much as men. It’s not just confidence–institutions matter, too. Sensitive and compelling, The Silent Sex is a must-read for anyone who cares about gender equality.”–Jane Mansbridge, Harvard Kennedy School

 

 

 

8-7 LinearTopics in Quaternion Linear Algebra
Leiba Rodman

“This is a very serious treatise by an author who is a powerful researcher and a clear expositor. I know of no other book that treats both the basic theory and advanced material as carefully and as comprehensively as this one. Topics in Quaternion Linear Algebra is a singular contribution of considerable value.”—Douglas R. Farenick, author of Algebras of Linear Transformations

Sample this book: http://press.princeton.edu/chapters/s10408.pdf

 

 

8-7 GenderWhy Gender Matters in Economics
Mukesh Eswaran

“This thoughtful, energetic, creative, and engaging book does a terrific job reviewing and explaining some of the most interesting economic research on gender in recent years. It fills an important gap in the gender and economics literature.”—Nancy Folbre, professor emeritus of economics, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Sample this book: http://press.princeton.edu/chapters/s10362.pdf

 

8-7 Why TolerateWhy Tolerate Religion?
Brian Leiter
With a new preface by the author

“A model of clarity and rigour and at points strikingly original, this is a book that anyone who thinks seriously about religion, ethics and politics will benefit from reading.”–John Gray, New Statesman

 

 

 

Hot off the Presses — Princeton University Press’s #NewBooks for this week

Franz Schubert and His World<br>Edited by Christopher H. Gibbs & Morten Solvik Franz Schubert and His World
Edited by Christopher H. Gibbs & Morten Solvik

During his short lifetime, Franz Schubert (1797–1828) contributed to a wide variety of musical genres, from intimate songs and dances to ambitious chamber pieces, symphonies, and operas. The essays and translated documents in Franz Schubert and His World examine his compositions and ties to the Viennese cultural context, revealing surprising and overlooked aspects of his music.

Sample this book: http://press.princeton.edu/chapters/s10393.pdf

Mathematics for the Life Sciences<br>Erin N. Bodine, Suzanne Lenhart & Louis J. Gross Mathematics for the Life Sciences
Erin N. Bodine, Suzanne Lenhart & Louis J. Gross

“This is the book I always wanted to write, a masterful and thorough introduction to the basic mathematical, statistical, and computational tools one needs to address biological problems, punctuated with solid and motivational applications to biology. The book is a seamless and authoritative treatment, with broad scope, that makes an ideal text for an introductory course.”–Simon A. Levin, editor of The Princeton Guide to Ecology

Sample this book: http://press.princeton.edu/chapters/s10298.pdf

Princeton University Press Launches Princeton Legacy Library

Princeton University Press Launches Princeton Legacy Library

More than 3,000 Out-of-Print Books from Its Celebrated Backlist will become available through Ingram Content Group

Princeton Legacy Library Web site: http://press.princeton.edu/princeton-legacy-library

On Monday, July 14, 2014, Princeton University Press will introduce the Princeton Legacy Library (PLL), its newly digitized out-of-print backlist. The PLL will make Princeton’s backlist titles available digitally through Ingram Content Group in both print-on-demand editions and as ebooks for libraries and scholarly institutions through leading library aggregators.

According to Press Director Peter J. Dougherty, “By digitizing our backlist in the Princeton Legacy Library, the Press has used the latest technology to make our past publications readily available to readers all over the world. Researchers and students in many developing countries will have access to our historical titles for the first time ever.”

On July 14, over 1,200 titles will be released in the Princeton Legacy Library with subsequent batches planned through 2016, moving backward through Princeton University Press’s vaunted publishing history. Books included in the first installment will cover the years from approximately 1980 to 2000. When completed, the program will include over 3,000 titles. Notable titles this year include George Kennan’s Russia Leaves the War. Volume 1 of Soviet-American Relations(1986), John Wheeler’s edited Quantum Theory and Measurement (1983), Gladys Reichard’s Navaho Religion (1963), Sandra Zimdars-Swartz’s Encountering Mary: From La Salette to Medjugorje (1991), and John Polkinghorne’s The Faith of a Physicist: Reflections on a Bottom-Up Thinker (1994).

“It’s gratifying to know that our work and innovation at Ingram Content Group is making a program such as the Princeton Legacy Library possible,” said John Ingram, Ingram Content Group’s Chairman and CEO, and ’83 graduate of Princeton University. “Reviving out-of-print works so they continue to be resources for learning is one of the many ways we are using new technology to improve accessibility and availability of reading material on a global scale. On many levels, I’m pleased that Ingram is partnering with Princeton University Press to support their pursuit to provide scholarly content to learners around the world.”

“This project has been made possible in large part by advances in digital technology,” according to Assistant Director and Director of Marketing Adam Fortgang, who noted, “Over the past few years, the Press has seen a significant increase in demand for our out-of-print books and, with the advent of improved scanning technology, we felt we could fulfill our scholarly mission by making high-quality digital editions of these books available once again.”

Produced using the latest print-on-demand technology, these paperback editions preserve the original texts of these important books and present them in durable and affordable volumes for new generations of readers.

Working closely with Ingram, the Press developed a system to automate the creation of paperback covers to give the Princeton Legacy Library a standard look and format. The cover designs were created by Tom Geismar of the distinguished graphic design firm, Chermayeff & Geismar & Haviv. All books in the Library will be available digitally for libraries and institutions. Initially, the ebook versions will not be available via retailers until sufficient demand warrants additional conversions.

In keeping with the fundamental mission of Princeton University Press, the Princeton Legacy Library continues the Press’s commitment, “to disseminating the highest quality scholarship (through print and digital media) both within academia and to society at large. Princeton University Press seeks to publish the innovative works of the greatest minds in academia, from the most respected senior scholar to the extraordinarily promising graduate student, in each of the disciplines in which we publish.”

 

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