Christopher Bail talks to Salon about “Terrified”

Christopher Bail, author of Terrified: How Anti-Muslim Fringe Organizations Became Mainstream, recently spoke with Paul Rosenberg for a feature in Salon on how anti-Muslim sentiment is fostered by the broader cultural landscape, and the innovative new methodology he has used to study that process. Paul Rosenberg at Salon writes:

It may be hard to fathom or remember, but in the immediate aftermath of 9/11 the American public responded with an increased level of acceptance and support for Muslims. President Bush—who had successfully courted the Muslim vote in 2000—went out of his way to praise American Muslims on numerous occasions in 2001 and 2002. However, the seeds were already being planted that would change that drastically over time.  Within a few short years, a small handful of fringe anti-Muslim organizations—almost entirely devoid of any real knowledge or expertise, some drawing on age-old ethno-religious conflicts—managed to hijack the public discourse about Islam, first by stoking fears, grabbing attention with their emotional messaging, then by consolidating their newfound social capital, forging ties with established elite organizations, and ultimately building their own organizational and media infrastructure.

How this all happened is the subject of a fascinating new book, “Terrified: How Anti-Muslim Fringe Organizations Became Mainstream,” by sociologist Christopher Bail, of the University of North Carolina.  The book not only lays bare the behind-the-scenes story of a momentous shift in public opinion, it employs cutting-edge computer analysis techniques applied to large archives of data to develop a new theoretical outlook, capable of making sense of the whole field of competing organizations struggling to shape public opinion, not just studying one or two the most successful ones. The result is not only a detailed account of a specific, significant, and also very pernicious example of cultural evolution, but also a case study in how to more rigorously study cultural evolution more generally in the future. In the process, it sheds considerable light on the struggles involved, and the difficulties faced by those trying to fight back against this rising tide of misdirected fear, anger and hatred.


Read the full interview with Christopher Bail that follows here.

Terrified, by Christopher Bail

Emilie M. Hafner-Burton – Making Human Rights a Reality, Winner of the 2015 ISA Annual Best Book Award

Emilie M. Hafner-Burton, author of Making Human Rights a Reality, is a winner of the 2015 ISA Annual Best Book Award. The award was presented at the International Studies Association’s annual meeting in February in New Orleans.

The ISA shared the award committee comments with us. “Global concern for human rights has grown since the end of World War II and the Holocaust, and remains high in the aftermath of genocides in Rwanda and Bosnia, and newly emergent crises in South Sudan and elsewhere. Numerous treaties and agreements have been enacted to protect and define human rights, forming a prominent feature of contemporary international law. And yet the incidence of violations of human rights seems only to increase. In this groundbreaking book, Professor Hafner-Burton takes up the challenge of understanding what has gone wrong with the enforcement of human rights and what we can do about it. After a survey of human rights abuses and treaties, she proposes a ‘stewardship strategy’ and outlines a series of changes to the human rights regime to improve their overall efficacy. She argues for a serious commitment to the enforcement of human rights combined with a recognition that the resources that can be committed are limited and must be deployed where they are likely to be most effective. Applying insights from the enforcement of criminal law, Hafner-Burton looks at strategies that are more likely to produce the desired results, and proposes new policies that will change the incentives of people who would violate human rights, and for the policy makers, lawyers, and activists who seek to contain and stop them. Ambitious, thought-provoking, comprehensive, and controversial, Making Human Rights a Reality is an important contribution to international law and human rights, and international relations theory.”

Congratulations to Emilie M. Hafner-Burton! Read the first chapter of Making Human Rights a Reality for free, here.


 

bookjacket

Making Human Rights a Reality
Emilie M. Hafner-Burton

May the odds be in your favor — March Mathness begins

Let the games begin! After the excitement of Selection Sunday, brackets are ready for “the picking.” Have you started making your picks?

Check out the full schedule of teams selected yesterday, and join the fun by submitting a bracket to the official Princeton University Press March Madness tournament pool.

Before you do, we recommend that you brush up on your bracketology by checking out PUP author Tim Chartier’s strategy:

 

 

For more on the math behind the madness, head over to Dr. Chartier’s March Mathness video page. Learn three popular sport ranking methods and how to create March Madness brackets with them. Let math make the picks!

Be sure to follow along with our March Mathness coverage on our blog, and comment below with your favorite strategy for making March Madness picks.

Win an Autographed Copy of Story/Time by Bill T. Jones

Coinciding with the 20th season of Dancing with the Stars, premiering tonight, we are giving away three autographed copies of dancer, choreographer, and director Bill T. Jones’s Story/Time.

How to win? There are three ways to enter: visit Story/Time’s Facebook page; email us at blog@press.princeton.edu; or follow @PrincetonUPress on Twitter. Just follow the steps in the Rafflecopter box below. The winner will be selected on or around March 23, 2015.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

[Update: This giveaway has ended and the winner has been notified]

bookjacket

Story/Time:
The Life of an Idea
Bill T. Jones

Happy Birthday Albert Einstein

“Learn from yesterday, live for today, hope for tomorrow. The important thing is to not stop questioning.” – Albert Einstein

This is a huge year for Einstein at Princeton University Press. December marked the celebrated launch of The Digital Einstein Papers, a free open-access website that puts The Collected Papers of Albert Einstein online for the very first time. Today is Albert Einstein’s 136th birthday, as well as Pi Day, which, as Steven Strogatz writes in The New Yorker, is far “more than just some circle fixation.” So once you’ve rung it in with this Pi Day recipe, you might like to check out this book list in honor of the influential scientist and writer, who fittingly enough, shares his birthday with the popular mathematical holiday. Sample chapters for several Einstein related books are linked below.

 

bookjacket

The Meaning of Relativity:
Including the Relativistic Theory of the Non-Symmetric Field (Fifth Edition)

Fifth edition
Albert Einstein
With a new introduction by Brian Greene
Chapter 1

The Collected Papers of Albert Einstein, Volume 14:
The Berlin Years: Writings & Correspondence, April 1923–May 1925

Documentary edition
Albert Einstein
Edited by Diana Kormos Buchwald, József Illy, Ze’ev Rosenkranz, Tilman Sauer & Osik Moses

Chapter 1

 

bookjacket  The Road to Relativity:
The History and Meaning of Einstein’s “The Foundation of General Relativity” Featuring the Original Manuscript of Einstein’s Masterpiece

Hanoch Gutfreund & Jürgen Renn
With a foreword by John Stachel
Released April 2015

 

bookjacket The Physicist and the Philosopher:
Einstein, Bergson, and the Debate That Changed Our Understanding of Time

Jimena Canales
Released May 2015

 

bookjacket

Philosophy of Physics:
Space and Time

Tim Maudlin
Released May 2015Introduction

 

 

Pi Day Recipe: Apple Pie from Jim Henle’s The Proof and the Pudding

Tomorrow (March 14, 2015) is a very important Pi Day. This year’s local Princeton Pi Day Party and other global celebrations of Albert Einstein’s birthday look to be truly stellar, which is apt given this is arguably the closest we will get to 3.1415 in our lifetimes.

Leading up to the publication of the forthcoming The Proof and the Pudding: What Mathematicians, Cooks, and You Have in Common by Jim Henle, we’re celebrating the holiday with a recipe for a classic Apple Pie (an integral part of any Pi Day spread). Publicist Casey LaVela recreates and photographs the recipe below. Full text of the recipe follows. Happy Pi Day everyone!


Notes on Jim Henle’s Apple Pie recipe from Publicist Casey LaVela

The Proof and the Pudding includes several recipes for pies or tarts that would fit the bill for Pi Day, but the story behind Henle’s Apple Pie recipe is especially charming, the recipe itself is straightforward, and the results are delicious. At the author’s suggestion, I used a mixture of baking apples (and delightfully indulgent amounts of butter and sugar).

Crust:

All of the crust ingredients (flour, butter, salt) ready to go:

_IGP2734

After a few minutes of blending everything together with a pastry cutter, the crust begins to come together. A glorious marriage of flour and butter.

_IGP2742

Once the butter and flour were better incorporated, I dribbled in the ice water and then turned the whole wonderful mess out between two sheets of plastic wrap in preparation for folding. The crust will look like it won’t come together, but somehow it always does in the end. Magical.

_IGP2758

Now you need to roll out and fold over the dough a few times. This is an important step and makes for a light and flaky crust. (You use a similar process to make croissants or other viennoiserie from scratch.)

_IGP2765

I cut the crust into two (for the top crust and bottom crust) using my handy bench scraper:

_IGP2780

Apples:

The apples cored, peeled, and ready to be cut into slices. I broke out my mandolin slicer (not pictured) to make more even slices, but if you don’t own a slicer or prefer to practice your knife skills you can just as easily use your favorite sharp knife.

_IGP2749

Beautiful (even) apple slices:

_IGP2788

Action shot of me mixing the apple slices, sugar, and cinnamon together. I prefer to prepare my apple pie filling in a bowl rather than sprinkling the dry ingredients over the apple slices once they have been arranged in the bottom crust. I’m not sure if it has much impact on the flavor and it is much, much messier, but I find it more fun.

_IGP2797

Assembly:

The bottom crust in the pie plate:

_IGP2784

Arrange the apple slices in the bottom crust:

_IGP2804

Top with the second crust, seal the top crust to the bottom with your fingers, and (using your sharp knife) make incisions in the top crust to allow steam to escape:

_IGP2830

The apple pie before going into the oven (don’t forget to put a little extra sugar on top):

_IGP2847

The finished product:

_IGP2851

There was a little crust left over after cutting, so I shaped it into another pi symbol, covered it in cinnamon and sugar, and baked it until golden brown. I ate the baked pi symbol as soon as it had cooled (before thinking to take a picture), but it was delicious!

_IGP2848


Apple Pie

The story of why I started cooking is not inspiring. My motives weren’t pure. Indeed, they involved several important sins.

I really am a glutton. I love to eat. As a child, I ate well; my mother was a wonderful cook. But I always wanted more than I got, especially dessert. And of all desserts, it was apple pie I craved most. Not diner pies, not restaurant pies, and not bakery pies, but real, homemade apple pies.

When I was six, I had my first homemade apple pie. It was at my grandmother’s house. I don’t remember how it tasted, but I can still recall the gleam in my mother’s eye when she explained the secret of the pie. “I watched her make it. Before she put on the top crust, she dotted the whole thing with big pats of butter!”

Several times as I was growing up, my mother made apple pie. Each one was a gem. But they were too few—only three or four before I went off to college. They were amazing pies. The apples were tart and sweet. Fresh fall apples, so flavorful no cinnamon was needed. The crust was golden, light and crisp, dry when it first hit the tongue, then dissolving into butter.

I grew up. I got married. I started a family. All the while, I longed for that pie. Eventually I set out to make one.

Success came pretty quickly, and it’s not hard to see why. The fact is, despite apple pie’s storied place in American culture, most apple pies sold in this country are abysmal. A pie of fresh, tart apples and a crust homemade with butter or lard, no matter how badly it’s made, is guaranteed to surpass a commercial product.

That means that even if you’ve never made a pie before, you can’t go seriously wrong. The chief difficulty is the crust, but I’ve developed a reliable method. Except for this method, the recipe below is standard.

For the filling:
5 cooking apples (yielding about 5 cups of pieces)
1/4 to 1/3 cup sugar
2 Tb butter
1/2 to 1 tsp cinnamon
lemon juice, if necessary
1 tsp flour, maybe

For the crust:
2 cups flour
1 tsp salt
2/3 cup lard or unsalted butter (1 1/3 sticks)
water

The crust is crucial. I’ll discuss its preparation last. Assume for now that you’ve rolled out the bottom crust and placed it in the pie pan.

Core, peel, and slice the apples. Place them in the crust. Sprinkle with sugar and cinnamon. Dot with butter. Roll out the top crust and place it on top. Seal the edge however you like. In about six places, jab a knife into the crust and twist to leave a hole for steam to escape. Sprinkle the crust with the teaspoon of sugar.

Bake in a preheated oven for 15 minutes at 450° and then another 35 minutes at 350°. Allow to cool. Serve, if you like, with vanilla ice cream or a good aged cheddar.

Now, the crust:

Mix the flour and salt in a large bowl. Place the lard or butter or lard/butter in the bowl. Cut it in with a pastry cutter.

Next, the water. Turn the cold water on in the kitchen sink so that it dribbles out in a tiny trickle. Hold the bowl with the flour mixture in one hand and a knife in the other. Let the water dribble into the bowl while you stir with the knife. The object is to add just enough water so that the dough is transformed into small dusty lumps. Don’t be vigorous with the knife, but don’t allow the water to pool. If the water is dribbling too fast, take the bowl away from the faucet from time to time. When you’re done, the dough will still look pretty dry.

Recipes usually call for about 5 tablespoons of water. This method probably uses about that much.

Actually, the dough will look so dry that you’ll think it won’t stick together when it’s rolled out. In fact, it probably won’t stick together, but trust me. This is going to work.

Tear off a sheet of plastic wrap and lay it on the counter. Place a bit more than half the dough on the sheet and cover it with a second sheet of plastic.

With a rolling pin, roll the dough out between the two sheets. Roll it roughly in the shape of a rectangle.

It won’t look great and it probably would fall apart if you picked it up.

Don’t pick it up. Remove the top sheet of plastic wrap and fold the bottom third up, and fold the top third down, then do the same horizontally, right and left.

Now replace the top sheet of plastic wrap and roll the dough out gently into a disk.

This time it should look pretty decent. This time the dough will stick together.

You should be able to remove the top sheet of plastic and, using the bottom sheet, turn it over into the pie pan. The crust should settle in nicely without breaking.

Form the top crust the same way.

This method rolls each crust twice—usually not a good idea because working the dough makes it tough. But remarkably, crusts produced this way are tender and light. I’m not sure why but I suspect it’s because the dough is fairly dry.

Notes:
• Cooking apples are tart apples. The best I know is the Rhode Island Greening, but they’re hard to find. Baldwins and Jonathans are decent, but they’re hard to find too. The British Bramleys are terrific. I’ve made good pies from the French Calville Blanc d’Hiver. But we’re not living in good apple times. Most stores don’t sell apples for cooking. When in doubt, use a mixture.
• The lemon juice and the larger quantity of cinnamon are for when you have tired apples with no oomph. The cheese also serves this purpose. It should be a respectable old cheddar and it should be at room temperature.
• Consumption of too many commercial pies makes me loath to add flour or cornstarch to pie filling. The flour is here in case you fear your apples will be too juicy. I don’t mind juice in a pie, in moderation. If adding flour, mix the apples, sugar, cinnamon, and flour in a bowl before pouring into the crust.
• Lard is best. Its melting point is higher than butter’s. It successfully separates the flour into layers for a light, crispy crust. Butter is more likely to saturate the flour and produce a heavy crust. Some like half butter/half lard, preferring butter for its flavor. But the flavor of lard is nice too, and its porkiness is wonderful with apple.


This recipe is taken from:

Henle_TheProof_S15

The Proof and the Pudding

What Mathematicians, Cooks, and You Have in Common

Jim Henle

“If you’re a fan of Julia Child or Martin Gardner—who respectively proved that anyone can have fun preparing fancy food and doing real mathematics—you’ll enjoy this playful yet passionate romp from Jim Henle. It’s stuffed with tasty treats and ingenious ideas for further explorations, both in the kitchen and with pencil and paper, and draws many thought-providing parallels between two fields not often considered in the same mouthful.”—Colm Mulcahy, author of Mathematical Card Magic: Fifty-Two New Effects

The math behind March Madness

It’s almost that time again. The beginning of the March Madness basketball tournament is a few days away, and here at PUP, we cannot wait!

We’re marking our calendars (find the schedule here) and going over our bracketology, with a little help from PUP author Tim Chartier.

To kick off the countdown, we bring you an article from the Post and Courier, who checked in with Dr. Chartier about how numbers can be the best strategy in bracketology.

College basketball fans seeking to cash in on March Madness need to turn on their calculators and turn off their allegiances.

That was the message Dr. Tim Chartier, a math professor at Davidson and published author, brought to cadets at The Citadel on Monday night.

“The biggest mistake people make in bracketology is they go with their heart no matter what the data says,” said Chartier, who has made studying the mathematics of the NCAA basketball tournament part of his students’ course work at Davidson. “They just can’t let a certain team win or they just have to see their team do well.

“It’s hard not to do that, because that is part of the fun.”

Chartier has made it easier for the average fan to use math in filling out their own brackets at the March Mathness website marchmathness.davidson.edu. The site will get a lot of traffic after the NCAA tournament field is announced on March 15.

 

Read the full article on the Post and Courier website.

Dr. Tim Chartier is a numbers guy, and not only during basketball season. He likes to show students how math can apply outside of the classroom. How can reposting on Twitter kill a movie’s opening weekend? How can you use mathematics to find your celebrity look-alike? What is Homer Simpson’s method for disproving Fermat’s Last Theorem? Dr. Chartier explores these and other questions in his book Math Bytes.

(Photo courtesy of Davidson College)

(Photo courtesy of Davidson College)

 

As Dr. Chartier and others gear up for basketball lovers’ favorite time of year, PUP reminds you to mark your calendars for these key dates.

Check back here soon for more hoop scoop!

• Selection Sunday, March 15, ESPN

• First and Second Rounds, March 20, 22 or March 21, 23

• Greensboro Regional, March 27, 29, Greensboro Coliseum (Greensboro, North Carolina)

• Oklahoma City Regional, March 27, 29, Chesapeake Energy Arena (Oklahoma City, Oklahoma)

• Albany Regional, March 28, 30, Times Union Center (Albany, New York)

• Spokane Regional, March 28, 30, Spokane Veterans Memorial Arena (Spokane, Washington)

• National Semifinals, April 5, Amalie Arena (Tampa Bay, Florida)

• Championship Game, April 7, Amalie Arena (Tampa Bay, Florida)

Book Trailer: Climate Shock

In Climate Shock, Gernot Wagner & Martin L. Weitzman discuss the consequences of a hotter planet. Learn more about this fascinating book in the new trailer below.

 

Check out the first chapter of Climate Shock for free, here.


 

 

bookjacket Climate Shock:
The Economic Consequences of a Hotter Planet
Gernot Wagner & Martin L. Weitzman

Behind the Scenes: Jacket Design

Regardless of the age-old saying, “never judge a book by its cover,” we are all guilty of doing so. Luckily, Princeton University Press has a great team of designers who are able to effectively convey a book’s intention. Today we are giving you a behind the scenes look at how the designers created the covers that were selected for the AAUP Book Jacket and Journal Show.

 

Social Life of Money

This book isn’t your typical book about money in that it argues that money is a process—not a thing to be hoarded. Money is a verb, not a noun. It is social, dynamic, alive, complex, and ever-changing.

It was discussed from the beginning of the design process that the cover should clearly illustrate this concept of money as a social process in a fresh, modern, and exciting way, and avoid any trite old images such as banknotes, coins, banking, etc. After exploring four different visual approaches, I came up with this idea to create a typographic design that reflects the title with the S (for Social) and L (for Life) combining to create a dollar sign. By adding overlapping paths of arrows moving in different directions and tilting the design on a diagonal, the cover feels energized, dynamic, and has a sense of motion and moving forward.

-Chris Ferrante

k10395[1]

Terrified explains how a group of people can help shape a culture with the help of the media’s influence. This book focuses on the influence around anti-Muslim organizations, and displays hoards of media research, from newspaper articles to social media messages. From the start, we knew the design would not be photographic. A specific image could easily send the wrong message, and many book covers in this genre used photographs. The design was inspired by the immense amount of data contained in the book. What came to mind were the vast amount of opinions, incorrect assumptions, and drastic jumps to conclusions that often took place when the media covered a situation. I had the image of many people talking at once and tried to convey this by making the jacket feel crowded, pushy, and overwhelming. I chose quotes directly from the interior, allowing the sentences to flow and influence each other similar to the influence of people’s words.

-Amanda Weiss

8-7 Aristotle's Ethics

 

As a mainstay of Western philosophical thought, this newly revised edition of Aristotle’s writings on ethics was repackaged for a contemporary audience. The design needed to maintain the classic tone associated with previous volumes of the philosopher’s works while also seeking to attract present-day scholars. I aimed to achieve this by updating the typography and colors of the previous volumes of Aristotle’s Complete Works. I created a few colored variants of the same layout using the typeface Lydian (seeing a bit of a renaissance in the last few years). Ultimately, an orange to pink gradient won out as the final cover design and set the tone for the neatly organized interior treatment.

 

Bekker numbers, found along the margins and top of the page, are used in most works of Aristotle’s writings as a standard form of reference. Having never worked with these before I knew early on I would need to establish some clarity for readers with all of those numbers on the page. Generous white space was used between the folios and reference numbers so that similar elements could be clearly distinguished.

-Jason Alejandro

 

 

Anthony Carelli – Carnations: Poems, Winner of a 2015 Whiting Award

Anthony Carelli, author of Carnations: Poems, is a winner of a 2015 Whiting Award. “Since 1985, the Whiting Foundation has supported creative writing through the Whiting Awards, which remain one of the most prestigious and largest monetary gifts to writers (each winner receives $50,000), and are based on early accomplishment and the promise of great work to come.”

Comments from the Whiting Award judges: “These are poems that manage to strike a balance between the expansive impulse and meticulous precision, between the meditative mode and ecstatic proclamation. And in straddling those divides, they enact, in line after line, small miracles.”

To learn more about the awards click, here.

Congratulations to Anthony Carelli!


 

bookjacket

Carnations:
Poems
Anthony Carelli

#NewBooks released March 9, 2015

Books released during the week of March 9, 2015.

New Hardcovers

bookjacket

The Second Red Scare and the Unmaking of the New Deal Left
Landon R. Y. Storrs
“[I]mportant, portentous work…the means by which the once powerful American Left was reduced to stigmatized impotence were farm from pretty. In fact, Storrs argues convincingly that historians have yet to grasp just how ugly they were.” –David Hawkes, Times Literary Supplement

 

New Paperbacks

bookjacket Britain’s Butterflies:
A Field Guide to the Butterflies of Britain and Ireland

Fully Revised and Updated Third edition
David Newland, Robert Still, Andy Swash & David Tomlinson
Praise for the previous edition: “Undoubtedly this book is one of the best and could be used to help one find and then identify Britain’s butterflies with confidence.” –Nick Bowles, Atropos

 

bookjacket Islamic Political Thought:
An Introduction

Edited by Gerhard Bowering
Praise for Princeton’s previous edition: “[L]ucid and engaging…Enlightening and challenge…[A] work of high-quality erudition packaged in an accessible manner which will benefit a wider readership.” –Times Literary Supplement

 

bookjacket The Limits of Partnership:
U.S.-Russian Relations in the Twenty-First Century

Updated edition
Angela E. Stent
“In her largely chronological account of U.S.-Russian relations since 1990, Ms. Stent gives a comprehensive overview of the obstacles that have prevented a closer relationship.”–Yascha Mount, Wall Street Journal

 

William B. Helmreich is the Winner of the 2015 GANYC Award for Outstanding Achievement in Book Writing

William B. Helmreich, author of The New York Nobody Knows: Walking 6,000 Miles in the City, is the winner of the 2015 GANYC Award for Outstanding Achievement in Book Writing. The Guides Association of New York City was founded “by licensed guides for licensed guides.” It is one of the oldest and most active tour guide associations in the country.

The 1st Annual GANYC Apple Awards ceremony was held on March 2, 2015 , at the Leonard Nimoy Thalia at Symphony Space in New York City. There were nine categories of awards (a total of 36 nominees), and Bill Helmreich won the only book award.

More information about the ceremony can be found, here.

Congratulations to William B. Helmreich!


 

bookjacket

The New York Nobody Knows:
Walking 6,000 Miles in the City
William B. Helmreich