Through the Eye of a Needle and Rethinking the Other in Antiquity are selected as Cambridge Heffer’s Classic Books of 2012

Through the Eye of a Needle:
Wealth, the Fall of Rome, and the Making of Christianity in the West, 350-550 AD

Peter Brown

Peter Brown examines the rise of the church through the lens of money and the challenges it posed to an institution that espoused the virtue of poverty and called avarice the root of all evil. Drawing on the writings of major Christian thinkers such as Augustine, Ambrose, and Jerome, Brown examines the controversies and changing attitudes toward money caused by the influx of new wealth into church coffers, and describes the spectacular acts of divestment by rich donors and their growing influence in an empire beset with crisis. He shows how the use of wealth for the care of the poor competed with older forms of philanthropy deeply rooted in the Roman world, and sheds light on the ordinary people who gave away their money in hopes of treasure in heaven.

“To compare it with earlier surveys of this period is to move from the X-ray to the cinema. . . . Every page is full of information and argument, and savoring one’s way through the book is an education. It is a privilege to live in an age that could produce such a masterpiece of the historical literature.”–Gary Wills, New York Review of Books

 

bookjacketRethinking the Other in Antiquity

Erich S. Gruen

Gruen shows how the ancients incorporated the traditions of foreign nations, and imagined blood ties and associations with distant cultures through myth, legend, and fictive histories. He looks at a host of creative tales, including those describing the founding of Thebes by the Phoenician Cadmus, Rome’s embrace of Trojan and Arcadian origins, and Abraham as ancestor to the Spartans. Gruen gives in-depth readings of major texts by Aeschylus, Herodotus, Xenophon, Plutarch, Julius Caesar, Tacitus, and others, in addition to portions of the Hebrew Bible, revealing how they offer richly nuanced portraits of the alien that go well beyond stereotypes and caricature.

Providing extraordinary insight into the ancient world, this controversial book explores how ancient attitudes toward the Other often expressed mutuality and connection, and not simply contrast and alienation.

“[T]he range of research, and the depth of thought, are extraordinary. Gruen has taken on a massively important subject, and he has brought a genuinely new perspective to the scholarly conversation.”–Emily Wilson, New Republic

American economists Alvin E. Roth and Lloyd Shapley are awarded the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Science

2 Princeton University Press authors have won the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Science. Alvin E. Roth and Lloyd Shapely have received this award for their outstanding achievements in marketing:

http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/economics/laureates/2012/press.html

Press Release

15 October 2012

The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences has decided
to award The Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences
in Memory of Alfred Nobel for 2012 to

Alvin E. Roth
Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA, and Harvard Business School, Boston, MA, USA

and

Lloyd S. Shapley
University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA

“for the theory of stable allocations and the practice of market design”.

 

Alvin E. Roth, U.S. citizen. Born 1951 in USA. Ph.D. 1974 from Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA. George Gund Professor of Economics and Business Administration at Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA, and Harvard Business School, Boston, MA, USA.
http://kuznets.fas.harvard.edu/~aroth/alroth.html

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The Handbook of Experimental Economics
Edited by John H. Kagel & Alvin E. Roth

 


Lloyd S. Shapley
, U.S. citizen. Born 1923 in Cambridge, MA, USA. Ph.D. 1953 from Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, USA. Professor Emeritus at University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
www.econ.ucla.edu/shapley/index.html

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Advances in Game Theory. (AM-52)
Edited by Melvin Dresher, Lloyd S. Shapley and Albert William Tucker

 

Values of Non-Atomic Games
Robert J. Aumann and Lloyd S. Shapley

 

Three Prizes for “No Man’s Land” by Cindy Hahamovitch

Congratulations to PUP author Cindy Hahamovitch, author of No Man’s Land: Jamaican Guestworkers in America and the Global History of Deportable Labor.

This past weekend, Hahamovitch collected three rewards for No Man’s Land: the Philip Taft Labor History Book Award, the Organization of American Historians‘ Merle Curti Award (for the year’s best book in American social and/or American intellectual history), and the  Organization of American Historians’ James A. Rawley Prize in American History (for the year’s best book addressing the history of race relations in the United States).

According to the Curti Award Committee:

While we have considerable scholarship about migrant farmworkers in the U.S. West, Hahamovitch is the first to study those in the eastern states. No Man’s Land addresses the history of a massive global phenomenon — corporate employers relying on guestworkers who, because they are not citizens, are unable to defend themselves against exploitation and abuse of their rights as workers. No Man’s Land is a deeply comparative study, resting on extensive knowledge of and research in Jamaica and on more than 25 interviews with former guestworkers. It analyzes agents in the system—notably federal and state governments, in both their actions and their inaction, and also the growers, the Jamaican government, and the workers themselves, not only farmworkers but also the female maids and waitresses brought in after 1986.

Read more here!

“On Compromise and Rotten Compromises” wins the Hannover Institute’s 2012 Philosophical Book Award

Avishai Margalit’s book On Compromise and Rotten Compromises has been awarded the 2012 Philosophical Book Award  from the Hannover Institute of Philosophical Research. This prize is awarded for “the best new book of the last three years referring to a controversial problem in practical philosophy.  The Philosophical Book Award is designed to shed some light on urgent philosophical questions and to improve efforts to answer them.”

On Compromise and Rotten Compromises deals with the topic of political compromise, in particular “rotten compromises” made in the name of peace. A great read in the run-up to election season!

“The Indignant Generation” wins the 2012 BCALA Literary Award

Congratulations to Lawrence P. Jackson, whose book The Indignant Generation: A Narrative History of African American Writers and Critics, 1934-1960 has won the 2012 BCALA Literary Award in the Nonfiction Category. This award recognizes excellence in adult fiction and nonfiction by African American authors published in 2011. According to the BCALA press release:

“The Indignant Generation is a fascinating exploration of the development of African American literature after the Harlem Renaissance to the modern day Civil Rights Movement. Lawrence P. Jackson offers readers rare insights into the lives of key players who contributed to the breadth of writing that flourished between 1934 and 1960. From Zora Neale Hurston and Langston Hughes to James Baldwin and Lorraine Hansberry, Jackson highlights the unique challenges faced by the writers during the time of the Great Depression, Jim Crow, World War II and the Cold War. Dozens of illustrations and photographs enhance this stunning work that celebrates African American artistic and intellectual achievement in writing. Professor Jackson teaches English and African American Studies at Emory University.”

 

PROSE Awards 2012: Live in Washington D.C.!

On Thursday, February 2nd, the 2012 PROSE Awards will be livestreamed from Washington D.C. Hopefully Princeton University Press will be bringing home some prizes! “The PROSE Awards annually recognize the very best in professional and scholarly publishing by bringing attention to distinguished books, journals, and electronic content in over 40 categories. Judged by peer publishers, librarians, and medical professionals since 1976, the PROSE Awards are extraordinary for their breadth and depth.”

Check out the broadcast from 12-1:30 EST here: http://www.proseawards.com/video.html

Margot Canaday’s “The Straight State” wins the 2012 Order of the Coif Biennial Book Award

Margot Canaday’s brilliant book The Straight State: Sexuality and Citizenship in Twentieth-Century America has won the 2012 Order of the Coif Biennial Book Award.

 “The Order of the Coif is an honorary scholastic society the purpose of which is to encourage excellence in legal education by fostering a spirit of careful study, recognizing those who as law students attained a high grade of scholarship, and honoring those who as lawyers, judges and teachers attained high distinction for their scholarly or professional accomplishments.”

 This is Margot Canaday’s SEVENTH award for The Straight State. Some of the other accolades include the 2011 John Boswell Prize, the 2010 Cromwell Book Prize, the Lora Romero First Book Publication Prize, the Gladys M. Kammerer Award, and the Lambda Literary Award for LGBT Studies.

CHOICE Outstanding Academic Titles 2011

A whopping 27 PUP titles have been named CHOICE “Outstanding Academic Titles” 2011by CHOICE Magazine!

“This year’s Outstanding Academic Title list includes 629 books and electronic resources chosen by the Choice editorial staff from among the 7,263 titles reviewed by Choice during the past year. Of these, 600 are print products; the remaining 29 are electronic. These outstanding works have been selected for their excellence in scholarship and presentation, the significance of their contribution to the field, and their value as important–often the first–treatment of their subject.”

The complete list of PUP titles on the CHOICE list:

Auden, W. H. (Jacobs, ed.) THE AGE OF ANXIETY

Bálazs, Béla (Zipes, transl.) THE CLOAK OF DREAMS

Casson, Douglas, John LIBERATING JUDGMENT

Cole, Michael W. AMBITIOUS FORM

Dayan, Colin THE LAW IS A WHITE DOG

Fried, Michael THE MOMENT OF CARAVAGGIO

Galor, Oded UNIFIED GROWTH THEORY

Hagan, John WHO ARE THE CRIMINALS?

Heilman, Samuel C. THE REBBE
and Menachem M. Friedman

Humphrey, Nicholas SOUL DUST

Hyman, Louis DEBTOR NATION

Ikenberry, G. John LIBERAL LEVIATHAN

Jayawardhana, Ray STRANGE NEW WORLDS

Lepore, Jill THE WHITES OF THEIR EYES

Mattison, Chris FROGS AND TOADS OF THE WORLD

Paul, Gregory S. THE PRINCETON FIELD GUIDE TO DINOSAURS

Schmitz, Oswald J. RESOLVING ECOSYSTEM COMPLEXITY

Sejersted, Francis THE AGE OF SOCIAL DEMOCRACY
(Adams, ed., Daly, transl.)

Shapiro, Ian (et al.) THE REAL WORLD OF DEMOCRATIC THEORY

Thagard, Paul THE BRAIN AND THE MEANING OF LIFE

Trubowitz, Peter POLITICS AND STRATEGY

Tyler, Tom R. WHY PEOPLE COOPERATE

Vendler, Helen LAST LOOKS, LAST BOOKS

Wasley, Aidan THE AGE OF AUDEN

Weintraub, David A. HOW OLD IS THE UNIVERSE?

Wendel, W. Bradley LAWYERS AND FIDELITY TO LAW

Willmer, Pat POLLINATION AND FLORAL ECOLOGY

Special congratulations to Colin Dayan and Louis Hyman whose respective books The Law is a White Dog: How Legal Rituals Make and Unmake Persons and Debtor Nation: The History of America in Red Ink have been given the additional distinction of being in the “Top 25 Books For 2011.”

 

Elizabeth Popp Berman and Daniel Carpenter win awards from the Social Science History Association

Elizabeth Popp Berman, author of Creating the Market University: How Academic Science Became an Economic Engine, has won the 2011 President’s Book Award from the Social Science History Association. This award recognizes “an especially meritorious first work by a beginning scholar.”

Daniel Carpenter, who wrote Reputation and Power: Organizational Image and Pharmaceutical Regulation at the FDA, has won the SSHA’s 2011 Allan Sharlin Memorial Award for “an outstanding book in social science history published in the previous year.”

Congratulations to both authors on their fantastic achievements!

 

Edwidge Danticat honored with the 2011 Langston Hughes Medal

Congratulations to Edwidge Danticat, author of Create Dangerously: The Immigrant Artist at Work, who has been honored with the 2011 Langston Hughes Medal from City College of New York. The award recognizes the body of Danticat’s work.

“The Langston Hughes Medal is awarded to highly distinguished writers from throughout the African American diaspora for their distinguished contributions to the arts and letters. Among past recipients of this award are James Baldwin, Gwendolyn Brooks, Toni Cade Bambara, Paule Marshall, Toni Morrison, Ralph W. Ellison, Alice Walker, Maya Angelou, August Wilson, Chinua Achebe, Derek Walcott, and Octavia Butler, to name a few.”

Here is a video of a Q&A with the author at the 2011 Langston Hughes Festival:

“Muslim Lives in Eastern Europe” wins the John D. Bell Memorial Book Prize

Kristen Ghodsee’s “Muslim Lives in Eastern Europe: Gender, Ethnicity, and the Transformation of Islam in Postsocialist Bulgaria” has won the 2011 John D. Bell Memorial Book Prize from the Bulgarian Studies Association. This award is established for the most outstanding recent scholarly book within any area of Bulgarian studies.

“Muslim Lives in Eastern Europe examines how gender identities were reconfigured in a Bulgarian Muslim community following the demise of Communism and an influx of international aid from the Islamic world. Kristen Ghodsee conducted extensive ethnographic research among a small population of Pomaks, Slavic Muslims living in the remote mountains of southern Bulgaria. After Communism fell in 1989, Muslim minorities in Bulgaria sought to rediscover their faith after decades of state-imposed atheism. But instead of returning to their traditionally heterodox roots, isolated groups of Pomaks embraced a distinctly foreign type of Islam, which swept into their communities on the back of Saudi-financed international aid to Balkan Muslims, and which these Pomaks believe to be a more correct interpretation of their religion.

Ghodsee explores how gender relations among the Pomaks had to be renegotiated after the collapse of both Communism and the region’s state-subsidized lead and zinc mines. She shows how mosques have replaced the mines as the primary site for jobless and underemployed men to express their masculinity, and how Muslim women have encouraged this as a way to combat alcoholism and domestic violence. Ghodsee demonstrates how women’s embrace of this new form of Islam has led them to adopt more conservative family roles, and how the Pomaks’ new religion remains deeply influenced by Bulgaria’s Marxist-Leninist legacy, with its calls for morality, social justice, and human solidarity.”

This is the most recent in a slew of prizes for “Muslim Lives,” which has also won the 2011 Davis Center Book Prize, the 2011 William A. Douglass Prize in Europeanist Anthropology, and the 2010 Heldt Prize.

 

Amy Hungerford’s “Postmodern Belief” and Mark Valeri’s “Heavenly Merchandize” shortlisted for the 2011 American Academy of Religion Award for Excellence

Congratulations to Amy Hungerford, whose book “Postmodern Belief: American Literature and Religion since 1960″ has been shortlisted for the 2011 American Academy of Religion Award for Excellence in the Textual Study of Religion.

We would also like to congratulate Mark Valeri, whose book “Heavenly Merchandize: How Religion Shaped Commerce in Puritan America” was shortlisted for the 2011 American Academy of Religion Award for Excellence in the Historical Study of Religion.

“In order to give recognition to new scholarly publications that make significant contributions to the study of religion, the American Academy of Religion offers Awards for Excellence. These awards honor works of distinctive originality, intelligence, creativity and importance; books that affect decisively how religion is examined, understood, and interpreted.”

Check out the announcement of the 2011 winning books here.