The complete line up for Princeton’s Pi Day Celebration

As noted earlier, we are partnering with the Princeton Public Library and the Princeton Tour Company on some author presentations this week. In fact, Chuck Adler is the kick-off for the entire weekend with a talk on Wizards, Aliens, and Starships at the Princeton Public Library on Thursday evening. Physicist Doug Stone will then present about Einstein’s under acknowledged contributions to quantum theory and quantum mechanics on Pi Day proper. We hope you will join the library in welcoming our authors and that you will check out the other fantastic, fun events scheduled over the weekend.

To really give you a sense of what to expect, read this excellent preview from the Princeton Packet.

An Infinitely Delightful Number of Events Planned for the 2014 Pi Day Princeton & Einstein Birthday Party Celebrations!

Adler_Wizards_jktThursday, 3.13.14             PI DAY EVE

7:00 p.m.

Academic Celebrity Pi Day Event with Charles Adler at Princeton Public Library

Friday, 3.14.14                 PI DAY & EINSTEIN’S BIRTHDAY

11:00 a.m.

Walking Tour of Einstein’s Neighborhood begins at 116 Nassau Street (the U-Store)

1:59 p.m.

Deadline to submit International Pi Day Princeton Video Contest

3:14 p.m.

Walk a Pi Event at YMCA

3:14 p.m.

Pizza Pi Competition at Princeton Pi – Mayor & Superintendent of Princeton Schools are judges!   Winner receives free pizza for a year!  (Email here to register your middle school aged competitor.)

3:14 p.m.

Launch of Free Smart Phone Tour of Princeton & EinsteinStone_EinsteinQuantum_jkt

6:00 p.m.

Academic Celebrity Pi Day Event with famed physicist A. Douglas Stone at Princeton Library

8:00 p.m.

Princeton Light Up The Night Event - Courtesy of Princeton University, Princeton Township and Princeton Pedestrian/Bicyclist Advisory Committee

8:00 p.m.

Outerbridge Ensemble, led by pianist, Steve Hudson at Arts Council of Princeton

Saturday, 3.15.14            OUR UNREAL CELEBRATION DAY

9:00 a.m.

Pie Eating Contest at McCaffrey’s at Princeton Shopping Center and moderated by Princeton comedic celebrity, Adam Bierman. Winner gets bragging rights and all the pie they can eat first thing in the morning!

10:00 a.m.

Kids’ Violin Exhibition at Princeton Library by Princeton Symphony Orchestra (Email here to register your 3yr – 6yr old child)

11:00 a.m.

Einstein Look A Like Contest at Princeton Library. Winner of 13yrs and younger category receives $314.15  (Email here to register your child.)

11:00 a.m.

“Happy Birthday Einstein!” party at Historical Society of Princeton (Email here to register your child)

12:00 p.m.

International Puzzle Celebrity Guest: Tetsuya Miyamoto, inventor of KENKEN at Princeton Library

12:00 p.m.

Dinky Rides with Einstein at Dinky Station

12:00 p.m

Academic Celebrity Book Signing with Jennifer Berne at Jazams

1:00 p.m.

KENKEN Tournament for Teens (and other teen-spirited humans) at Princeton Library

1:00 p.m.

Pi Recitation Contest at Princeton Library. Winner of Youth Category (aged 7yrs – 13 yrs) receives $314.15  (Email here to register your child.)

1:30 p.m.

Finding Pi – hands on activities for children 5yrs and up at Princeton Library

2:00 p.m.

Celebrity Book Party with Laura Overdeck at Labyrinth Books

2:15 p.m.

Rubik’s Cube Interactive Demonstration at Princeton Library

2:45 p.m.

Pie Judging Event at Nassau Inn Yankee Doodle Tap Room by Real Possibilities Accounting Firm  First 50 participants to arrive will decide the Best Apple Pie among select Princeton bakeries!

3:14 p.m.

Pie Throwing Event at Palmer Square Green

3:14 p.m.

World Premiere & Announcement of International Video Contest Winner on Facebook . Winning Middle School receives $314.15

3:30 p.m.

Guided Einstein Tour with Mimi Omiecinski of Princeton Tour Company  begins at Library

4:00 p.m.

“Happy Birthday Einstein!” party at Historical Society of Princeton (Email here to register your child)

4:00 p.m.

Mega Chess Champion Demo & Free Style Play featuring chess champion David Hua

5:00 p.m.

Pi Social & Concert at Princeton Library

ADVANCED REGISTRATION for Pi Day Competitions and EARLY ARRIVAL are preferred to guarantee participation.  All contests are free and open to the public.  Arts Council Performance and Historical Society Birthday Parties require a nominal fee.  See website for additional details.

A detailed description, rules and addresses for Pi Day 2014 Events can be found here!

Pi Day and Princeton as perfect as…well…pie

As you can well imagine, Einstein is kind of a big deal in Princeton. So, it’s not too surprising that Pi Day, the annual celebration of Einstein’s actual birthday on March 14 (3.14!) that has morphed into a celebration of all things scientific and mathematical, is practically a town-wide holiday. Princeton University Press is partnering with Princeton Public Library on some very exciting events with our authors.

j10070[1]Chuck Adler will kick things off at 7 PM on Pi Day Eve (yes, I may have just invented a new holiday) at the Princeton Public Library with a discussion of his new book Wizards, Aliens, and Starships. Chuck’s specialty is looking at the mathematical underpinnings of some of our favorite works of science fiction and fantasy literature. Why is Hogwart’s always so dark? Could the Weasleys’ flying car really exist? How much longer do we have to wait for Star Trek-style teleportation and/or space elevators? Chuck answers these questions and more with fun, accessible math.

j10068[1]The following day, Doug Stone headlines the Pi Day festivities with a talk about Einstein and the Quantum: The Quest of the Valiant Swabian, a new book that argues that Einstein’s contributions to science have not been fully realized. While we acknowledge Einstein as the father of relativity, we haven’t really understood the scope of the work he did on quantum theory and why he ultimately turned his back on this area of inquiry. Join Doug at the Princeton Public Library at 6 PM as he fills in the gaps and presents a more complete portrait of Einstein’s career than ever available before.

For a complete list of PiDay events in Princeton, including a mysterious pizza pi competition and Einstein walking tours, please visit the official Pi Day Princeton web site.

“Is Judaism a Religion?” Leora Batnitzky at the Tikvah Center, February 20, 2014

Batnitzky_How_F11

Join the Tikvah Center as they welcome Leora Batnitzky for a discussion of the intellectuals who recast Judaism as a modern religion, those that opposed the change, and the legacy of modern Jewish thought today.

Is Judaism a Religion?

Leora Batnitzky

Thursday, February 20, 2014 at 5:30pm EST

The Tikvah Center
165 East 56th Street, 4th Floor
New York, New York 10022

Reserve your seat: http://tikvahfund.org/events/is-judaism-a-religion/

Nineteenth century political emancipation brought citizenship rights to European Jews.  In How Judaism Became a Religion, Leora Batnitzky explores how this new political reality affected Jewish philosophy and the Jewish people.  The prospect of secular citizenship challenged Judaism’s premodern integrity, and drove Jewish writers, intellectuals, and rabbis to grapple with how to recast Judaism as a “religion,” emphasizing its private faith over its national call to public practice.  The transformation of Judaism as a religion – and reactions to it – is the driving question of modern Jewish thought to this day.  What does Judaism gain and lose as a religion?  What effects, positive and negative, has this modern transformation yielded?  How does conceiving of Judaism as a religion relate to Zionism and the refounding of a Jewish State for the Jewish People?

Leora Batnitzky is the Ronald O. Perelman Professor of Jewish Studies, Professor of Religion, and Chair of the Department of Religion at Princeton University.

Spot the Princeton University Press titles in the PROSE awards rap

Princeton University Press wins big at the 2014 PROSE Awards

American_PROSE_awards_logo[1] The Professional and Scholarly Publishing (PSP) Division of the Association of American Publishers (AAP) announced the 2013 PROSE Award Winners yesterday at the PSP Annual Conference in Washington, D.C.  According to the PROSE press release, the 2013 PROSE Awards received a record-breaking 535 entries—more than ever before in its 38-year history—in more than 40 categories. For full information about the 2013 PROSE Award winners: http://www.proseawards.com/current-winners.html

Princeton University Press won top awards in 3 Book Subject Categories, and received 11 Honorable Mention awards—a total of 14 awards. We are so happy to congratulate our authors:

 

3 Category Award Winners

Robert Bartlett, Why Can the Dead Do Such Great Things?
Winner of the 2013 PROSE Award in European and World History, Association of American Publishers

Thomas G. Pavel, The Lives of the Novel
Winner of the 2013 PROSE Award in Literature, Association of American Publishers

Anat Admati and Martin Hellwig, The Bankers’ New Clothes
Winner of the 2013 PROSE Award in Business, Finance & Management, Association of American Publishers

 

11 Honorable Mention Winners

S. Frederick Starr, Lost Enlightenment
Honorable Mention for the 2013 PROSE Award in European and World History, Association of American Publishers

John Sides and Lynn Vavreck, The Gamble
Honorable Mention for the 2013 PROSE Award in Government & Politics, Association of American Publishers

Ruth R. Wisse, No Joke
Honorable Mention for the 2013 PROSE Award in Language & Linguistics, Association of American Publishers

W. Bernard Carlson, Tesla
Honorable Mention for the 2013 PROSE Award in Biography & Autobiography, Association of American Publishers

Jeremy Adelman, Worldly Philosopher
Honorable Mention for the 2013 PROSE Award in Biography & Autobiography, Association of American Publishers

Katrina van Grouw, The Unfeathered Bird
Honorable Mention for the 2013 PROSE Award in Biological Sciences, Association of American Publishers

Lance Fortnow, The Golden Ticket
Honorable Mention for the 2013 PROSE Award in Popular Science & Mathematics, Association of American Publishers

Jeremiah P. Ostriker and Simon Mitton, Heart of Darkness
Honorable Mention for the 2013 PROSE Award in Cosmology & Astronomy, Association of American Publishers

Tom Stephenson and Scott Whittle, The Warbler Guide
Honorable Mention for the 2013 PROSE Award in Single Volume Reference/Science, Association of American Publishers

Angus Deaton, The Great Escape
Honorable Mention for the 2013 PROSE Award in Economics, Association of American Publishers

William B. Helmreich, The New York Nobody Knows
Honorable Mention for the 2013 PROSE Award in Sociology & Social Work, Association of American Publishers

Princeton University Press’s Best-Selling Titles for the Past Week

These are the best-selling books for the past week.

 

The Founder’s Dilemmas: Anticipating and Avoiding the Pitfalls That Can Sink a Startup by Noam Wasserman
The Box: How the Shipping Container Made the World Smaller and the World Economy Bigger by Marc Levinson
k10054 The Great Escape: Health, Wealth, and the Origins of Inequality by Angus Deaton
What W.H. Auden Can Do for You by Alexander McCall-Smith
Tesla: Inventor of the Electrical Age by W. Bernard Carlson Tesla: Inventor of the Electrical Age by W. Bernard Carlson
On Bullshit by Harry G. Frankfurt
The Dollar Trap: How the U.S. Dollar Tightened Its Grip on Global Finance by Eswar S. Prasad
The New York Nobody Knows: Walking 6,000 Miles in the City by William B. Helmreich
k8967
This Time Is Different: Eight Centuries of Financial Folly
by Carmen M. Reinhart & Kenneth S. Rogoff
Beautiful Geometry by Eli Maor and Eugen Jost

Princeton University Press’s Best-selling Titles for the Last Week

These are the best-selling books for the past week.

 

What W.H. Auden Can Do for You by Alexander McCall-Smith
Beautiful Geometry by Eli Maor and Eugen Jost
Tesla: Inventor of the Electrical Age by W. Bernard Carlson Tesla: Inventor of the Electrical Age by W. Bernard Carlson
Maimonides: Life and Thought by Moshe Halbertal
The Princeton Dictionary of Buddhism by Robert E. Buswell Jr. & Donald S. Lopez Jr.
Oxygen: A Four Billion Year History by Donald E. Canfield
k10054 The Great Escape: Health, Wealth, and the Origins of Inequality by Angus Deaton
The 5 Elements of Effective Thinking by Edward Burger and Michael Starbird
On Bullshit by Harry G. Frankfurt
k8967
Mostly Harmless Econometrics: An Empiricist’s Companion
by Joshua D. Angrist & Jörn-Steffen Pischke

New documentary Ivory Tower explores the challenges of higher education in the 21st century

Watch this:

Then read this:

Delbanco_College

Andrew Delbanco recently attended Sundance Film Festival where he participated in a screening of Ivory Tower, a new documentary on the spiraling costs of higher education and the impact this has on students and their families. The director of the documentary is Andrew Rossi, who rose to prominence thanks to his earlier work Page One: Inside the New York Times. Delbanco is featured quite a bit in the movie which hopefully will have a greater distribution soon. In the meantime, to bone up on the challenges universities and colleges face, please check out College: What It Was, Is, and Should Be.

Warm up with Lentil Soup with Mettwurst from Cooking for Crowds

Plummeting temperatures means hot soup for dinner, so I wanted to share this delicious recipe for Lentil Soup with Mettwurst from Cooking for Crowds: 40th Anniversary Edition by Merry White. The image is taken directly from the book so you can see the layout and cute Edward Koren illustration that accompanies the recipe in print, but a text version is below, too, in case you need it.

Also, you might enjoy this interview Merry gave over the winter break.

soup

 

Lentil Soup with Mettwurst

A rich and filling soup, with which you will need only bread, salad, and dessert to make a good lunch or supper. Try it with other sausages or cooking salamis, too. Any uncooked (but smoked) fine-grained sausage may be substituted.

6 12 20 50
dried green lentils 1 c 2 c 3 ½ c 7 c
butter 2 tbs 4 tbs 7 tbs 2 sticks
large onion, finely chopped 1 2 3 ½ 8
celery stalks, finely chopped 1 2 3 8
carrots, peeled and thinly sliced 2 4 7 14
bay leaves 1 2 3 5
thyme Pinch ½ tsp 1 tsp 2 ½ tsp
bouillon, or rich chicken stock 1 qt 2 qts 3 ½ qts 7 qts
mettwurst ½ lb 1 lb 2 lbs 4 lbs
salt & pepper (to taste)

Soak the lentils in water to cover overnight.

The next day, drain the lentils well. Melt the butter in a large saucepan and add the chopped onion, celery, and carrots, then the bay leaves and thyme. Let simmer, covered, for about 15 minutes. Add the bouillon or stock, lentils, and sausage and cook at a gentle simmer for about 2 hours, or until the lentils are tender.

Remove the sausage and set aside. Put the soup in a blender in small batches and blend until smooth. Leave about one-quarter of the soup unblended and add to the smooth soup for “texture.”

Slice the reserved sausage and add to the soup with salt and pepper to taste.

NOTE: The soup can be reheated, but more stock or water will be needed because lentils thicken as they stand. It can also be kept in a cool place, unrefrigerated.

Princeton University Press’s best-selling titles

Books make great gifts and people are stocking up ahead of Christmas. These are the best-selling books for the past week.

 

Helmreich_NewYork The New York Nobody Knows: Walking 6,000 Miles in the City by William B. Helmreich
The Box: How the Shipping Container Made the World Smaller and the World Economy Bigger by Marc Levinson
Tesla: Inventor of the Electrical Age by W. Bernard Carlson Tesla: Inventor of the Electrical Age by W. Bernard Carlson
k10054 The Great Escape: Health, Wealth, and the Origins of Inequality by Angus Deaton
Stephenson_WarblerG The Warbler Guide by Tom Stephenson & Scott Whittle
Would You Kill the Fat Man?: The Trolley Problem and What Your Answer Tells Us about Right and Wrong by David Edmonds
On Bullshit by Harry G. Frankfurt
k8967 Einstein and the Quantum: The Quest of the Valiant Swabian by A. Douglas Stone
QED: The Strange Theory of Light and Matter by Richard P. Feynman
The Crossley ID Guide: Raptorsby Richard Crossley, Jerry Liguori, and Brian Sullivan

Poet, Critic Susan Stewart to Lead Princeton Series of Contemporary Poets

Stewart_Love Lessons_AUphotoPrinceton University Press is pleased to announce that the poet and MacArthur Fellow Susan Stewart will be the new editor for its Princeton Series of Contemporary Poets. She succeeds Paul Muldoon, Pulitzer Prize-winning poet and New Yorker poetry editor.

Stewart, who also has had a distinguished career as a critic and translator, is currently the Avalon Foundation University Professor in the Humanities: Professor of English at Princeton University where she teaches aesthetics, poetics, and the history of poetry and directs the Society of Fellows in the Liberal Arts. Stewart is a past chancellor of the Academy of American Poets, a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the recipient of an Academy Award in Literature from the American Academy of Arts and Letters.

On her appointment, Susan Stewart said: “At this moment, when American poets have taken so many new directions in their individual poems and the shapes of their books of poems, I look forward to considering a wide range of submissions, from new and established poets alike. The series will, I hope, feature volumes notable for their originality and considered sense of form.”

Princeton Humanities Publisher Rob Tempio said: “Everyone at Princeton University Press is thrilled and honored that Susan has agreed to succeed Paul Muldoon as editor of the Contemporary Poets series. She is a brilliant poet, scholar and critic who is perfectly poised to identify and foster compelling and original voices from all areas of contemporary poetry.”

Stewart will serve for a three year term. Submissions of complete manuscripts for the series may be sent to the Press between the dates of May 1st and May 31st each year and Stewart will announce selections each September.

Princeton University Press published Stewart’s first book of poems Yellow Stars and Ice as part of the Princeton Series of Contemporary Poets in 1981 and also published her translation Love Lessons: Selected Poems of Alda Merini in 2009. Her volumes of poetry include The Hive, The Forest, Red Rover, and Columbarium, which won the 2003 National Book Critics Circle Award.

Through the Princeton Series of Contemporary Poets, the Princeton University Press is dedicated to publishing the best work of today’s emerging and established poets. Starting in 1975 with the publication of Sadness and Happiness: Poems by Robert Pinsky, the series quickly distinguished itself as one of the most important publishing projects of its kind, winning praise from critics and poets alike. Other publications in the series include landmark collections such as Before Recollection (1987) by Ann Lauterbach, Hybrids of Plants and of Ghosts (1980) and Erosion (1983) by Jorie Graham, The Eternal City: Poems (2010) by Kathleen Graber, and Almanac: Poems (2013) by Austin Smith.

Media Inquiries:
Casey LaVela
casey_lavela@press.princeton.edu
609.258.9491

Day 5 of #UPWeek is finally here — the global reach of university presses

upweekToday is the last day of the University Press Week Blog Tour and it’s finally our turn! Today Peter Dougherty considers the importance of finding foreign language publishers to translate and publish UP-generated works. We are joined by a raft of other publishers considering the various ways university presses are expanding the global reach of the scholarship we publish.


Columbia University Press
www.cupblog.org
Georgetown University Press
georgetownuniversitypress.tumblr.com

Discusses how Georgetown University Press gives its readers the tools they need to have a global reach themselves through our foreign language learning materials, our international career guides, and our international affairs titles.

Indiana University Press
iupress.typepad.com
IUP presents an overview of their Mellon-funded Framing the Global project which will develop and disseminate new knowledge, approaches, and methods in the field of global research.
Johns Hopkins University Press
jhupressblog.com

From book translations to international marketing and the growth of Project MUSE into many different nations, the JHU Press can’t help but think beyond the borders of the United States.

New York University Press
fromthesquare.org
Chip Rossetti, managing editor of the Library of Arabic Literature (LAL), will discuss the new LAL series, an ambitious international project which comes out of a partnership between NYU Press and NYU Abu Dhabi.
Princeton University Press
press.princeton.edu/blog
Peter Dougherty, Press Director, writes about the importance of foreign language translations to the future of university press economic health and fulfillment of our missions.
University of Wisconsin Press
uwpress.wordpress.com

Press director Sheila Leary profiles the publishing career of Jan Vansina, one of the founders of the field of African history (rather than colonial history). His innovative seven books with the University of Wisconsin Press from the 1960s to the present have continually broken new ground, influencing the historiography of Africa and several related disciplines.

Yale University Press
blog.yupnet.org

Ivan Lett writes on recent transatlantic collaboration of US-UK marketing initiatives for Yale University Press globally published titles, series, and digital products.

The complete schedule for the blog tour is located here.