Hot off the Presses — Princeton University Press’s #NewBooks for this week

8-11 Art of DealArt of the Deal: Contemporary Art in a Global Financial Market
Noah Horowitz
With a new postscript by the author

“Art of the Deal is a crucial book on art and finance.”
–Blake Gopnik, Daily Beast

 

 

 

8-11 ConusConus of the Southeastern United States and Caribbean
Alan J. Kohn
Princeton Wild Guides

“World-class scholarship. This is a great book that takes readers on a scholarly grand tour from the earliest research history to the latest methodological approaches used to understand the biology and relationships of this intriguing group of gastropods. Kohn provides an amazing and unprecedented wealth of information.”–Rüdiger Bieler, coauthor of Seashells of Southern Florida

 

8-11 EntrepreneurialThe Entrepreneurial Group: Social Identities, Relations, and Collective Action
Martin Ruef

“Ruef explodes the myth of the lone entrepreneur, showing how those who start businesses assemble productive groups around themselves. He explains in a brilliant, original way how groups evolve into viable organizations and why some succeed while others fail. This is a must-read for anyone who wants to understand how entrepreneurs build businesses and why growing an enterprise is a team sport.”–Philip Anderson, INSEAD, director of the Rudolf and Valeria Maag International Centre for Entrepreneurship

 

8-11 Saved in AmericaGetting Saved in America: Taiwanese Immigration and Religious Experience
Carolyn Chen

“This book thus offers interesting points of view on the construction of identity and constitutes a good reference for understanding the family and religious traditions of the Taiwanese people: meaningful anecdotes, examples, and quotations, and a psychological approach.”–Hayet Sellami, China Perspectives

 

 

8-11 GoverningGoverning America: The Revival of Political History
Julian E. Zelizer

“Zelizer’s essays give the reader a good grasp of the ways that politics has unfolded over the past half century. And the range of topics gives a good sense of where the field lies at this point. The scholarship is impeccable, the sources appropriate, and the tone scholarly without being pedantic. As this collection of Zelizer’s finest work indicates, the discipline of history still has room for political history.”–John H. Barnhill, Canadian Journal of History

 

 

8-11 Moral DisquietMoral Disquiet and Human Life
Monique Canto-Sperber
Translated by Silvia Pavel

“[A]n extremely rich and wide-ranging work, written by one of the foremost contemporary moral philosophers in France. . . . Without at all sacrificing rigor, [Monique Canto-Sperber] demonstrates in a most resounding way that philosophy at its very best is plentiful in its resources to speak quite illuminatingly to the circumstances of life that agonize us so.”–Laurence Thomas, Ethics

 

 

8-11 presidential LeadershipPresidential Leadership and the Creation of the American Era
Joseph S. Nye, Jr.

“Sometimes the best presidential decisions are decisions not to act. This point is made in an excellent new book by Joseph Nye of Harvard University entitled Presidential Leadership and the Creation of the American Era.”–Gideon Rachman, Financial Times

 

 

 

8-11 TurthTruth
Alexis G. Burgess & John P. Burgess

Truth is remarkably succinct. . . . Yet it covers a great amount of ground with accessible discussions of a variety of topics. . . . [I]ntelligent and provocative.”–Michael P. Lynch, Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews

 

 

 

8-11 Black HoleWhat Does a Black Hole Look Like?
Charles D. Bailyn

“This book goes straight to the heart of astronomical intuition and evidence about black holes. Written in a highly accessible style, it provides enough information to educate an undergraduate astronomy or physics major without going into the many details required in a graduate class. I think students will greatly enjoy this book and derive significant insight from it.”–Coleman Miller, University of Maryland, College Park

 


Hot off the Presses — Princeton University Press’s #NewBooks for this week

8-6 Against SecurityAgainst Security: How We Go Wrong at Airports, Subways, and Other Sites of Ambiguous Danger
Harvey Molotch (With a new preface by the author)

“Mr. Molotch . . . present(s) a vivid picture of the ways in which poorly designed security measures can deform everyday life and defeat themselves.”–Jordan Ellenberg, Wall Street Journal

 

 

 

8-7 GarveyThe Age of Garvey: How a Jamaican Activist Created a Mass Movement and Changed Global Black Politics
Adam Ewing

“At last, an account of Garveyism worthy of its historic influence. Taking a unique approach to the twentieth century’s first black power movement, Ewing shows how Garveyism became a dynamic force in the politics of the interwar years. His superlative book bridges the genres of intellectual, social, and cultural history to serve as a model for the study of transnationalism.”–Vincent Brown, author of The Reaper’s Garden

 

 
8-7 Aristotle's EthicsAristotle’s Ethics: Writings from the Complete Works
Aristotle
Revised, edited, and with an introduction by Jonathan Barnes & Anthony Kenny

Reviews from The Complete Works of Aristotle: “This new edition makes a landmark of scholarship available in a very usable form.”–Library Journal

 

 

 

8-7 Atlas of CitiesAtlas of Cities
Edited by Paul Knox
With a foreword by Richard Florida

“This is an atlas with a difference. It broaches the complexity of the urban experience directly and in a beautifully persuasive graphical way, showing how this great variety of city types and features can be explained both chronologically and geographically. A wonderful book of new insights about how our contemporary cities have evolved.” –Michael Batty, author of The New Science of Cities

Sample this book: http://press.princeton.edu/chapters/i10307.pdf

8-7 Bee BookThe Bee: A Natural History
Noah Wilson-Rich
With contributions from Kelly Allin, Norman Carreck & Andrea Quigley
Earth is home to more than 20,000 bee species, from fluorescent-colored orchid bees and sweat bees to flower-nesting squash bees and leaf-cutter bees. This book takes an incomparable look at this astounding diversity, blending an engaging narrative with practical, hands-on discussions of such topics as beekeeping and bee health. It explores our relationship with the bee over evolutionary time, delving into how it came to be, where it stands today, and what the future holds for humanity and bees alike.

 

8-7 SlaveryBetween Slavery and Capitalism: The Legacy of Emancipation in the American South
Martin Ruef

“It would seem difficult to add any new knowledge to the history of the southern economy after the Civil War. But Martin Ruef has done just that. By arguing that the reconstruction of the southern economy was an uncertain and conflict-riven process, he suggests that the options that were pursued were a complex social construction that reflected the relative power of planters and their former slaves. Put simply, producing a labor market involved the construction of a new model of racial employment in the South. Ruef’s book uses previously unexploited data sources to examine the construction of this market from the bottom up and shows how this affected the life chances of African Americans for at least two generations.”–Neil D. Fligstein, University of California, Berkeley

8-7 Family ValuesFamily Values: The Ethics of Parent-Child Relationships
Harry Brighouse & Adam Swift

“Family Values is an important book on a neglected topic by two excellent scholars. It advances an original argument, and does so clearly and accessibly. Highly recommended.”–Stephen Macedo, Princeton University

 

 

 

8-7 GreenGreen: The History of a Color
Michel Pastoureau

“Beautifully illustrated.”–Daily Mail

 

 

8-7 Hidden ProcessesHidden Markov Processes: Theory and Applications to Biology
M. Vidyasagar

“This book provides a terrific introduction to an important and widely studied field–Markov processes (including hidden Markov processes)–with a particular view toward applications to problems in biology. With a wonderful balance of rigor, intuition, and choice of topics, the book gives a unique treatment of the subject for those interested in both fundamental theory and important applications.”–Sanjeev Kulkarni, Princeton University

 

 

 

8-7 OriginsThe Origins and History of Consciousness
Erich Neumann
With a foreword by C.G. Jung
Translated by R.F.C. Hull

“There can be no doubt that [Neumann] has brought to his task a remarkable . . . knowledge of classical mythology, some considerable acquaintance with the comparative study of religion, and a deep understanding of those psychological views and theories evolved by C. G. Jung.”–The Times Literary Supplement

 

 

8-7 ParadoxesParadoxes of Liberal Democracy: Islam, Western Europe, and the Danish Cartoon Crisis
Paul M. Sniderman, Michael Bang Petersen, Rune Slothuus & Rune Stubager

“Taking its starting point from the infamous Danish cartoon crisis and the clash of democratic values and Muslim fundamentalism that followed, this engagingly written, methodologically sophisticated, and creative study of public opinion adds substantially to a growing body of research into this ‘clash of civilizations’. The views of the Danish majority, far from scapegoating and vilifying the Muslim minority, distinguished carefully and intelligently between upholding the rights of this minority to live as Danish citizens while at the same time restricting freedoms for those associated with the threat of fundamentalist violence. This superb analysis of the nuances of public morality convincingly eschews simple answers to important and complex questions.”–Geoffrey Evans, University of Oxford

8-7 PenguinsPenguins: The Ultimate Guide
Tui De Roy, Mark Jones & Julie Cornthwaite

“The imagery in this book is incredible. Penguins is not only attractive and entertaining, but also an authoritative and easy-to-use reference. It is unlike any other book on the subject.”—Alvaro Jaramillo, author of Birds of Chile

 

 

8-7 EvangelicalThe Politics of Evangelical Identity: Local Churches and Partisan Divides in the United States and Canada
Lydia Bean

The Politics of Evangelical Identity is a bracing corrective to the perception of evangelicals as theological stooges mesmerized by the spell of conservative masterminds. Bean persuasively argues that the appeal of conservatives in the evangelical base has far more to do with how they connect the political to everyday spiritual and religious practices. Her path-clearing and transformative book brilliantly engages the political perspectives, moral passions, and religious beliefs of evangelicals from a practical, grounded perspective.”–Michael Eric Dyson, Georgetown University

 

8-7 ProfaneProfane Culture
Paul E. Willis
With a new preface by the author

A classic of British cultural studies, Profane Culture takes the reader into the worlds of two important 1960s youth cultures—the motor-bike boys and the hippies. Both groups were involved in an unequal but heroic fight to produce meaning and their own cultural forms in the face of a larger society dominated by the capitalist media and commercialism. They were pioneers of cultural experimentation, the self-construction of identity, and the curating of the self, which, in different ways, have become so widespread today.

Sample this book: http://press.princeton.edu/chapters/s10358.pdf

8-7 ReflectionA Reflection of Reality: Selected Readings in Contemporary Chinese Short Stories
Chih-p’ing Chou, Liping Yu & Joanne Chiang

“Chinese instruction is not only about teaching linguistic forms and their usages, but also about helping students obtain knowledge of Chinese culture and society. This timely book successfully achieves both of these goals by exposing students to literary works and language materials that are vivid and rich. A Reflection of Reality sets a model for teaching Chinese.”—Lening Liu, Columbia University

Sample this book: http://press.princeton.edu/chapters/s10387.pdf

8-7 Silent SexThe Silent Sex: Gender, Deliberation, and Institutions
Christopher F. Karpowitz & Tali Mendelberg

“This pathbreaking book brings us the latest research on why, in most public situations, women don’t speak up as much as men. It’s not just confidence–institutions matter, too. Sensitive and compelling, The Silent Sex is a must-read for anyone who cares about gender equality.”–Jane Mansbridge, Harvard Kennedy School

 

 

 

8-7 LinearTopics in Quaternion Linear Algebra
Leiba Rodman

“This is a very serious treatise by an author who is a powerful researcher and a clear expositor. I know of no other book that treats both the basic theory and advanced material as carefully and as comprehensively as this one. Topics in Quaternion Linear Algebra is a singular contribution of considerable value.”—Douglas R. Farenick, author of Algebras of Linear Transformations

Sample this book: http://press.princeton.edu/chapters/s10408.pdf

 

 

8-7 GenderWhy Gender Matters in Economics
Mukesh Eswaran

“This thoughtful, energetic, creative, and engaging book does a terrific job reviewing and explaining some of the most interesting economic research on gender in recent years. It fills an important gap in the gender and economics literature.”—Nancy Folbre, professor emeritus of economics, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Sample this book: http://press.princeton.edu/chapters/s10362.pdf

 

8-7 Why TolerateWhy Tolerate Religion?
Brian Leiter
With a new preface by the author

“A model of clarity and rigour and at points strikingly original, this is a book that anyone who thinks seriously about religion, ethics and politics will benefit from reading.”–John Gray, New Statesman

 

 

 

Hot off the Presses — Princeton University Press’s #NewBooks for this week

Franz Schubert and His World<br>Edited by Christopher H. Gibbs & Morten Solvik Franz Schubert and His World
Edited by Christopher H. Gibbs & Morten Solvik

During his short lifetime, Franz Schubert (1797–1828) contributed to a wide variety of musical genres, from intimate songs and dances to ambitious chamber pieces, symphonies, and operas. The essays and translated documents in Franz Schubert and His World examine his compositions and ties to the Viennese cultural context, revealing surprising and overlooked aspects of his music.

Sample this book: http://press.princeton.edu/chapters/s10393.pdf

Mathematics for the Life Sciences<br>Erin N. Bodine, Suzanne Lenhart & Louis J. Gross Mathematics for the Life Sciences
Erin N. Bodine, Suzanne Lenhart & Louis J. Gross

“This is the book I always wanted to write, a masterful and thorough introduction to the basic mathematical, statistical, and computational tools one needs to address biological problems, punctuated with solid and motivational applications to biology. The book is a seamless and authoritative treatment, with broad scope, that makes an ideal text for an introductory course.”–Simon A. Levin, editor of The Princeton Guide to Ecology

Sample this book: http://press.princeton.edu/chapters/s10298.pdf

Princeton University Press Launches Princeton Legacy Library

Princeton University Press Launches Princeton Legacy Library

More than 3,000 Out-of-Print Books from Its Celebrated Backlist will become available through Ingram Content Group

Princeton Legacy Library Web site: http://press.princeton.edu/princeton-legacy-library

On Monday, July 14, 2014, Princeton University Press will introduce the Princeton Legacy Library (PLL), its newly digitized out-of-print backlist. The PLL will make Princeton’s backlist titles available digitally through Ingram Content Group in both print-on-demand editions and as ebooks for libraries and scholarly institutions through leading library aggregators.

According to Press Director Peter J. Dougherty, “By digitizing our backlist in the Princeton Legacy Library, the Press has used the latest technology to make our past publications readily available to readers all over the world. Researchers and students in many developing countries will have access to our historical titles for the first time ever.”

On July 14, over 1,200 titles will be released in the Princeton Legacy Library with subsequent batches planned through 2016, moving backward through Princeton University Press’s vaunted publishing history. Books included in the first installment will cover the years from approximately 1980 to 2000. When completed, the program will include over 3,000 titles. Notable titles this year include George Kennan’s Russia Leaves the War. Volume 1 of Soviet-American Relations(1986), John Wheeler’s edited Quantum Theory and Measurement (1983), Gladys Reichard’s Navaho Religion (1963), Sandra Zimdars-Swartz’s Encountering Mary: From La Salette to Medjugorje (1991), and John Polkinghorne’s The Faith of a Physicist: Reflections on a Bottom-Up Thinker (1994).

“It’s gratifying to know that our work and innovation at Ingram Content Group is making a program such as the Princeton Legacy Library possible,” said John Ingram, Ingram Content Group’s Chairman and CEO, and ’83 graduate of Princeton University. “Reviving out-of-print works so they continue to be resources for learning is one of the many ways we are using new technology to improve accessibility and availability of reading material on a global scale. On many levels, I’m pleased that Ingram is partnering with Princeton University Press to support their pursuit to provide scholarly content to learners around the world.”

“This project has been made possible in large part by advances in digital technology,” according to Assistant Director and Director of Marketing Adam Fortgang, who noted, “Over the past few years, the Press has seen a significant increase in demand for our out-of-print books and, with the advent of improved scanning technology, we felt we could fulfill our scholarly mission by making high-quality digital editions of these books available once again.”

Produced using the latest print-on-demand technology, these paperback editions preserve the original texts of these important books and present them in durable and affordable volumes for new generations of readers.

Working closely with Ingram, the Press developed a system to automate the creation of paperback covers to give the Princeton Legacy Library a standard look and format. The cover designs were created by Tom Geismar of the distinguished graphic design firm, Chermayeff & Geismar & Haviv. All books in the Library will be available digitally for libraries and institutions. Initially, the ebook versions will not be available via retailers until sufficient demand warrants additional conversions.

In keeping with the fundamental mission of Princeton University Press, the Princeton Legacy Library continues the Press’s commitment, “to disseminating the highest quality scholarship (through print and digital media) both within academia and to society at large. Princeton University Press seeks to publish the innovative works of the greatest minds in academia, from the most respected senior scholar to the extraordinarily promising graduate student, in each of the disciplines in which we publish.”

 

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Princeton University Press’s Weekly Best-Seller List

These are the best-selling books for the past week.

1177 BC: The Year Civilization Collapsed by Eric H. Cline – 6th Week in a row!!
Why Government Fails So Often: And How It Can Do Better by Peter H. Schuck
The Transformation of the World: A Global History of the Nineteenth Century by Jürgen Osterhammel
Tambora: The Eruption That Changed the World by Gillen D’Arcy Wood
The Soul of the World by Roger Scruton
Everyday Calculus: Discovering the Hidden Math All around Us by Oscar E. Fernandez
Tesla: Inventor of the Electrical Age by W. Bernard Carlson Tesla: Inventor of the Electrical Age by W. Bernard Carlson
The Warbler Guide by Tom Stephenson and Scott Whittle
The Cosmic Cocktail: Three Parts Dark Matter by Katherine Freese
On Bullshit by Harry G. Frankfurt

The Marginalia Review of Books announces the “Lives of Great Religious Books Essay Competition”

From The Marginalia Review of Books web site:

Essay-Competition

The Marginalia Review of Books announces the “Lives of Great Religious Books Essay Competition.” We invite essay submissions of up to 3,000 words related to the theme of the reception of religious books, broadly conceived. Those interested should read past essays to ensure their submissions correspond to MRB‘s style. The eminent philosopher Roger Scruton will join the MRB editors to judge the competition. The winner will receive Princeton University Press’s entire Lives of Great Religious Books series, and we will consider all submissions for publication in early 2015.

The competition closes on November 1 and the winner will be announced in January 2015.

For details on how to submit an essay for consideration, please visit The Marginalia Review of Books web site.

About the Lives of Great Religious Books series:

Lives of Great Religious Books is a new series of short volumes that recount the complex and fascinating histories of important religious texts from around the world. Written for general readers by leading authors and experts, these books examine the historical origins of texts from the great religious traditions, and trace how their reception, interpretation, and influence have changed–often radically–over time. As these stories of translation, adaptation, appropriation, and inspiration dramatically remind us, all great religious books are living things whose careers in the world can take the most unexpected turns.

Carlin Romano called the series “innovative,” in his earlier article for The Chronicle of Higher Education and Bruce Elder, writing for The Sydney Morning Herald praised the series as an “inspired publishing idea.”

For a list of the books currently available in the series, please click here.

To see the list of forthcoming volumes, please click here.

 

Save the Date — David Reimer, “Count Like an Egyptian” at the Princeton Public Library on May 29

052914Reimer

Join the fun on May 29 at 7:00 PM as the Princeton Public Library and Princeton University Press welcome David Reimer, professor of mathematics and statistics at The College of New Jersey, for an exploration of the world of ancient Egyptian math and the lessons it holds for mathematicians of all levels today.

Prof. Reimer will present a fun introduction to the intuitive and often-surprising art of ancient Egyptian math. Learn how to solve math problems with ancient Egyptian methods of addition, subtraction, multiplication and division and discover key differences between Egyptian math and modern day calculations (for example, in spite of their rather robust and effective mathematics, Egyptians did not possess the concept of fractions).

Following the lecture, Prof. Reimer will sign copies of his new book, Count Like an Egyptian. Copies of will be available for purchase at the lecture or you can pick up a copy ahead of time at Labyrinth Books.

Looking forward to spring warblers? Join The Warbler Guide at these events in Philadelphia

We’re looking forward to spring with three fantastic warbler events this weekend at John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge at Tinicum. Tom Stephenson and Scott Whittle, co-authors of The Warbler Guide, will be on-hand to give workshops on warbler ID and guide a few walks.

Capture

 

Click here to download a PDF flyer for these events.

2014 Lawrence Stone Lecture Series to Feature Lorraine Daston

This year’s Lawrence Stone Lecture Series, featuring Lorraine Daston, will be held April 29 thru May 1. Entitled “Rules: A Short History of What We Live By,” the lecture will feature three different sessions:

April 29 — Rules of Iron, Rules of Lead: A Prehistory of an Indispensable and Impossible Genre

April 30 — Rules Go Rigid: Natural Laws, Calculations, and Algorithms

May 1 — Rules, Rationality, and Reasonableness

The events will be held in 010 East Pyne Building at 4:30 p.m.

The lecture series is co-sponsored by Princeton University Press, Princeton University’s History Department, and the Shelby Cullom Davis Center for Historical Studies. The Center was founded by former chair of the History Department, Lawrence Stone (1919-91). Each year, the lecture series features Princeton’s Lawrence Stone Visiting Professor, and the professor’s three lectures are then included in a book published by Princeton University Press.

Lorraine Daston is the executive director of the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science in Berlin as well as a visiting professor on the Committee on Social Thought at the University of Chicago.

april 15 lecture

Show Me the Money: PUP Authors on the Role of Wealth in Politics

How much can your buck get you in politics today? A forthcoming paper by PUP author Martin Gilens and Benjamin Page puts a finer point on the idea that money can enhance your influence on political policy. In fact, the authors give us an actual number for gauging that influence. Fifteen times — that is how much more important the collective preferences of “economic elites” are than those of other citizens, Gilens and Page found. Yes, you read that correctly.

Gilens and Page’s paper, which will run in Perspectives on Politics, explains how they came to this conclusion, studying “1,779 instances between 1981 and 2002 in which a national survey of the general public asked a favor/oppose question about a proposed policy change.” They write:

Multivariate analysis indicates that economic elites and organized groups representing business interests have substantial independent impacts on U.S. government policy, while average citizens and mass-based interest groups have little or no independent influence.

In a recent article on the Washington Post‘s Monkey Cage blog, PUP author and co-director of the Center for the Study of Democratic Institution, Larry Bartels, examines Gilens and Page’s findings and other research that contributes to what we know about the effects of money on political influence. Check out the article for Bartels’ take on this issue.

In this midterm election year, following the McCutcheon v. FEC ruling, money is on everyone’s minds. Looking to brush up on the theories and research behind these issues? You can read more from Bartels and Gilens — we invite you to read the sample chapters and other supplementary materials from their award-winning Princeton University Press books. We have also included a peek at political scientists Kay Lehman Schlozman, Sidney Verba and Henry E. Brady’s systematic examination of political voice in America.

 

 bookjacketRead Chapter One here. Using a vast swath of data spanning the past six decades, Unequal Democracy debunks many myths about politics in contemporary America, using the widening gap between the rich and the poor to shed disturbing light on the workings of American democracy. Larry Bartels shows the gap between the rich and poor has increased greatly under Republican administrations and decreased slightly under Democrats, leaving America grossly unequal. This is not simply the result of economic forces, but the product of broad-reaching policy choices in a political system dominated by partisan ideologies and the interests of the wealthy. In this interview, Bartels answers tough questions about the effect of money in America.

 

bookjacket “We are the 99%” has quickly become the slogan of our political era as growing numbers of Americans express concern about the disappearing middle class and the ever-widening gap between the super-rich and everyone else. Has America really entered a New Gilded Age? What are the political consequences of the growing income gap? Can democracy survive such vast economic inequality? These questions dominate our political moment–and Larry Bartels provides answers backed by sobering data.Princeton Shorts are brief selections taken from influential Princeton University Press books and produced exclusively in ebook format. Providing unmatched insight into important contemporary issues or timeless passages from classic works of the past, Princeton Shorts enable you to be an instant expert in a world where information is everywhere but quality is at a premium.

 

 bookjacketPreview the introduction here. Can a country be a democracy if its government only responds to the preferences of the rich? Affluence and Influence definitively explores how political inequality in the United States has evolved over the last several decades and how this growing disparity has been shaped by interest groups, parties, and elections.With sharp analysis and an impressive range of data, Martin Gilens looks at thousands of proposed policy changes, and the degree of support for each among poor, middle-class, and affluent Americans. His findings are staggering: when preferences of low- or middle-income Americans diverge from those of the affluent, there is virtually no relationship between policy outcomes and the desires of less advantaged groups. In contrast, affluent Americans’ preferences exhibit a substantial relationship with policy outcomes whether their preferences are shared by lower-income groups or not. Yet Gilens also shows that under specific circumstances the preferences of the middle class and, to a lesser extent, the poor, do seem to matter. In particular, impending elections–especially presidential elections–and an even partisan division in Congress mitigate representational inequality and boost responsiveness to the preferences of the broader public.

 

bookjacketRead Chapter One here. Politically active individuals and organizations make huge investments of time, energy, and money to influence everything from election outcomes to congressional subcommittee hearings to local school politics, while other groups and individual citizens seem woefully underrepresented in our political system.Drawing on numerous in-depth surveys of members of the public as well as the largest database of interest organizations ever created–representing more than thirty-five thousand organizations over a twenty-five-year period — The Unheavenly Chorus conclusively demonstrates that American democracy is marred by deeply ingrained and persistent class-based political inequality. The well educated and affluent are active in many ways to make their voices heard, while the less advantaged are not. This book reveals how the political voices of organized interests are even less representative than those of individuals, how political advantage is handed down across generations, how recruitment to political activity perpetuates and exaggerates existing biases, how political voice on the Internet replicates these inequalities–and more.

 

A miracle in Arcata, CA – report from the our stalwart sales rep Steve Ballinger

k10185We knew 1177 B.C. by Eric Cline would be a big book for us, but it has become a run-away seller (even appearing on the Canadian best-seller list the week of its release)  since its release in late March and we have just ordered a third printing! Not only is it topping the archaeology charts on Amazon, but it’s also seeing some great sell through in independent bookstores. Case in point, check out this terrific story from our West coast sales representative, Steve Ballinger.

Greetings – I’m back after a long haul through California. The rain was Weather Channel worthy at times. The orders were great. Somehow I didn’t get one good meal out of the trip. Carl’s Jr and Jack in Box were the top spots for cuisine last week. The route of the sales calls took me over the mountain ranges and forests, past the vast orchards of angry farmers, up and down the dreaded Grapevine. Yet, a miracle happened.

Friday, after visiting the bookstores in Ukiah, I drove on up to Northtown Books in Arcata. Northtown Bookstore could easily fit in the hipster haven of Brooklyn. The parking is better though. It was one of those situations of selling the list at the front counter and pausing while Dante, the store owner, handled customers. We got the first two books in the order, The Extreme Life of the Sea and The Transformation of the World. But then he passed on the ancient history titles even after much whimpering and trying on my part. I could just visualize the 1177 B.C. title in the store.

Well, a few customers came and went, a twenty-something mom with tousled hair asked about #7 and #8 of the Unicorn series and he said he could get it in for her. We got to Lost Animals and then the phone rang. I could hear him say, “As it turns out I am having a meeting with the publisher’s representative right now.” He came back shaking his head in amazement, the customer on the phone, had called to see if he could order 1177 B.C. Princeton’s new book. We went from zero to 2. A miracle. It was some guy named Darius.

A miracle in Arcata, CA.

Bob Geddes to Give Talk, Tour, and Book Signing at the Institute for Advanced Study

Calling all Princeton-area architecture fans: Bob Geddes will be giving a lecture, tour, and book signing of Fit: An Architect’s Manifesto, at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, NJ, on Saturday, April 5th, from 10:00 AM to 1:30 PM (EDT), sponsored by DOCOMOMO Philadelphia and DOCOMOMO NY/Tri-State.

Tickets and full event details are available via Eventbrite ($20 for DOCOMOMO members / $25 for non-members / FREE for IAS faculty, scholars, and staff).

Photo: Amy Ramsey, Courtesy of Institute for Advanced StudyMake it New, Make it Fit

The architecture of Geddes, Brecher, Qualls, and Cunningham (GBQC) has been largely overlooked in recent years—despite a remarkable and influential body of work beginning with their runner-up submission for the Sydney Opera House (1956). As significant contributors (along with Louis Kahn) to the “Philadelphia School,” GBQC’s efforts challenged modernist conceptions of space, functional relationships, technology, and—with an urbanist’s eye—the reality of change over time.

To explore the thinking behind the work, founding partner Robert Geddes, FAIA, will speak about his recent publication, Fit: An Architect’s Manifesto. In addition, Geddes will guide a tour through the venue for his talk, the Institute of Advanced Study’s Simmons Hall—a GBQC masterwork of 1971. Geddes will also participate in an informal discussion with participants during lunch at the IAS Cafeteria.

Schedule
10:00-10:30am      Dilworth Room. Event check in. Coffee served.
10:30-11:15am        Make it New, Make it Fit Lecture by Bob Geddes
11:15-11:50am        Building Tour
11:50-12:10pm       Lunch at cafeteria where discussion continues
12:10-1:00pm         Lunch and discussion
1:00-1:30pm           Wrap up and book signing.

Parking
LOT ‘B’ enter through West Building. When you arrive at the site, please bring a copy of your tickets, either printed or displayed on your mobile phone.

About the speaker
Robert Geddes is dean emeritus of the Princeton School of Architecture and founding partner of GBQC—recipient of the AIA’s Firm of the Year Award in 1979. Educated under Walter Gropius at Harvard’s Graduate School of Design, Geddes returned to his native Philadelphia in 1950 where he began his work as an educator at the University of Pennsylvania.