New offerings from PUP: A Fall preview video

This Fall we’re excited to launch some great new books across many disciplines. In The Curse of Cash, Ken Rogoff makes the case for phasing out large bills; Neil Degrasse Tyson, Richard Gott, and Michael Strauss lead a tour of the universe in Welcome to the Universe; and Roger Penrose explores how fashionable ideas and blind faith influence today’s leading physics researchers in Fashion, Faith, and Fantasy in the New Physics of the Universe. Get a peek at these and many more titles in our Fall 2016 Preview.

Princeton University Press Fall 2016 Preview from Princeton University Press on Vimeo.

Presenting the new trailer for Silent Sparks

Fireflies are beloved insects, conjurers of summer magic, but have you ever wondered exactly what is behind their flashing?  Check out the stunning trailer for our new book by biologist Sara Lewis, Silent Sparks: The Wondrous World of Fireflies.

Silent Sparks: The Wondrous World of Fireflies by Sara Lewis from Princeton University Press on Vimeo.

Presenting the new book trailer for Strange Glow: The Story of Radiation

Five years ago on March 12, following a devastating tsunami, Fukushima Prefecture in Japan experienced the largest release of radioactive materials since the infamous nuclear meltdown in Chernobyl 30 years before. The world, understandably, was braced for the worst. But molecular radiation biologist Tim Jorgensen, author of Strange Glow: The Story of Radiation says this accident was no Chernobyl. The levels measured at Fukushima after the meltdown aren’t much higher than the annual background levels that already existed—a fact that does little to allay fears for many. How much then, do we really know about radiation and its actual dangers? Though radiation is used in everything from x-rays to cell phones, much of the population still has what Jorgensen considers an uninformed aversion to any type of exposure. In this fascinating scientific history, he describes mankind’s extraordinary, often fraught relationship with radiation.

We are pleased to present the new book trailer for Strange Glow:

PUP’s Spring 2016 Preview

This spring, we’re publishing some exciting new titles across a range of disciplines. Where Are the Woman Architects? by Despina Stratigakos examines a male-dominated profession to uncover the causes for its dearth of women. Award-winning scientist and storyteller Sean B. Carroll takes us on a quest to discover the rules of regulation and their ramifications in The Serengeti Rules. If you’ve ever wondered about the secret lives of fireflies, then Silent Sparks by noted biologist Sara Lewis is the book for you. To see these titles and many more, check out our spring preview:

Introducing the trailer for The Little Big Number

Check out our book trailer for The Little Big Number by Dirk Philipsen for an introduction to why the concept of GDP has become harmful in our modern world.

Philipsen

In one lifetime, GDP, or Gross Domestic Product, has ballooned from a narrow economic tool into a global article of faith. It is our universal yardstick of progress. As The Little Big Number demonstrates, this spells trouble. While economies and cultures measure their performance by it, GDP ignores central facts such as quality, costs, or purpose. It only measures output: more cars, more accidents; more lawyers, more trials; more extraction, more pollution—all count as success. Sustainability and quality of life are overlooked. Losses don’t count. GDP promotes a form of stupid growth and ignores real development.

How and why did we get to this point? Dirk Philipsen uncovers a submerged history dating back to the 1600s, climaxing with the Great Depression and World War II, when the first version of GDP arrived at the forefront of politics. Transcending ideologies and national differences, GDP was subsequently transformed from a narrow metric to the purpose of economic activity. Today, increasing GDP is the highest goal of politics. In accessible and compelling prose, Philipsen shows how it affects all of us.

But the world can no longer afford GDP rule. A finite planet cannot sustain blind and indefinite expansion. If we consider future generations equal to our own, replacing the GDP regime is the ethical imperative of our times. More is not better. As Philipsen demonstrates, the history of GDP reveals unique opportunities to fashion smarter goals and measures. The Little Big Number explores a possible roadmap for a future that advances quality of life rather than indiscriminate growth.

Dirk Philipsen is a German- and American-trained professor of economic history, senior fellow at the Kenan Institute for Ethics, and a Duke Arts and Sciences Senior Research Scholar at Duke University. He is the author of We Were the People: Voices from East Germany’s Revolutionary Autumn of 1989. He lives in Durham, North Carolina.

Introducing the mesmerizing new trailer for Mathematics and Art

Looking for a unique coffee table book for someone mathematically or artistically inclined? Mathematics and art are surprisingly similar disciplines, given their distinctively introspective, expressive natures. Even before antiquity, artists have attempted to render mathematical concepts in visual form, and the results have often been spectacular. In a stunning illustrated cultural history that one truly has to see to appreciate, Lynn Gamwell of the School of Visual Arts in New York explores artistic representations from the Enlightenment—including Greek, Islamic, and Asian mathematics—to the modern era, including Aleksandr Rodchenko’s monochrome paintings. Check out her piece on the Guardian’s Adventures in Numberland blog, and the trailer for Mathematics and Art, here:

 

Romance, Crime, and… Mathematics? Presenting the new trailer for LA Math

LA Math by James D. Stein, emeritus professor in the Department of Mathematics at California State University, is full of A-listers and wannabes, lovers and lawyers, heroes and villains. And it’s also full of math—practical mathematics knowledge, ranging from percentages and probability to set theory, statistics, and the mathematics of elections. Check out the new trailer for this unconventional and highly readable book of mathematical short stories here:

Presenting the new video trailer for AFFORDABLE HOUSING IN NEW YORK

New York City, as expensive as it is progressive, has long had the need for high-quality affordable housing. Affordable Housing in New York, edited by Nicholas Dagen Bloom and Matthew Gordon Lasner, is a richly illustrated, dynamic portrait of an evolving city and the pioneering efforts to make it livable for lower and middle income residents. The book and its photos by David Schalliol was subject of this fabulous New York Times feature this past Sunday. We’re excited to offer you a peek inside, here:

 

New video trailer for The Secret of Our Success by Joe Henrich

Henrich jacketThe premise of Survivor, in which 16 previously unacquainted humans were routinely abandoned in forbidding locations to brave the elements, was no doubt wildly popular because of the simple fact that we humans, on our own, are virtually helpless. We aren’t particularly adept at building shelter, fending off predatory animals, and the thought of having to procure a meal with nothing but our bare hands and our wits is enough to make many of us run for our nearest Whole Foods. How on earth have we managed to dominate the globe when we can’t survive in the wild? As Joseph Henrich points out, human groups are far less hopeless than lone individuals, and our collective brains have produced ingenious technologies, sophisticated languages, and complex institutions that have not only allowed us to inhabit diverse environments, but have actually shaped biology. Check out the trailer for his new book, The Secret of our Success: How Culture is Driving Human Evolution, Domesticating our Species, and Making Us Smarter.

 

 

 

Introducing the new video trailer for The Quotable Feynman

Nobel Prize-winning physicist Richard P. Feynman (1918–88) is widely known for his scientific genius. But during his life, he became as famous for the wit, wisdom, and lucidity of his popular lectures and writings as for his fundamental contributions to physics. We are pleased to present the new video trailer for The Quotable Feynman, including approximately 500 quotations carefully selected by his daughter, Michelle Feynman, from his spoken and written legacy:

Check out chapter one here.

 

 

 

 

Introducing the new video trailer for The Princeton Companion to Applied Mathematics

We are pleased to present the new video trailer for The Princeton Companion to Applied Mathematics. Modeled on the popular Princeton Companion to Mathematics, this is an indispensable resource for undergraduate and graduate students, researchers, and practitioners in other disciplines seeking a user-friendly reference book. Check out the video in which editor Nicholas Higham, Richardson Professor of Applied Mathematics at The University of Manchester, talks about the major ideas covered in this expansive project, which includes nearly 200 entries organized thematically and written by an international team of distinguished contributors.

Behind every meal you eat, there is a story

Louise Fresco, president of Wageningen University and Research Centre in the Netherlands and author of Hamburgers in Paradise, talks about that story here: