Scheidel, Lo, and Tirole longlisted for FT & McKinsey Business Books of the Year

Scheidel Great Leveler jacketThe longlist for the Financial Times & McKinsey Business Books of the Year Award was announced on August 14th, and we’re thrilled that once again the list of finalists includes several Princeton University Press books:

The Great Leveler by Walter Scheidel, the first book to chart the crucial role of violent shocks in reducing inequality over the full sweep of human history around the world.

Economics for the Common Good by French winner of the Nobel prize in economics, Jean Tirole, a passionate manifesto for a world in which economics, far from being a “dismal science,” is a positive force for the common good.

Adaptive Markets by Andrew Lo, a new, evolutionary explanation of markets and investor behavior.

Economics for the Common Good by Jean TiroleThe shortlist for this highly distinguished prize will be announced on September 19th. The winner of the Business Book of the Year Award will be awarded £30,000, and £10,000 will be awarded to each of the remaining shortlisted books.

Take a look at all the finalists for this honor during the past decade here.

LoA heartfelt congratulations to our authors.

 

 

 

 

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Dear Readers,

We’re quite excited about this season’s line-up of PUP blog features by and about our authors, and can’t wait to share them with you. Following a recent migration to a new server, our RSS feed link has changed and the old one will soon be phased out. To be sure that you don’t miss the next installment in PUPinions, Aeon essays, or author Q&As, follow our RSS feed at this new link.

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Introducing our Fall 2017 Preview video

We’ve got a lot of new and exciting titles slated for release in Fall 2017. Take a look:

Princeton University Press awarded the Lyman H. Butterfield Award

At the 2017 annual meeting of the Association for Documentary Editing held in Buffalo, New York, Princeton University Press was awarded the Lyman H. Butterfield Award, given annually by the Association since 1985 “to an individual, project, or institution for recent contributions in the areas of documentary publication, teaching, and service.” The award is granted in memoriam of Lyman Butterfield, whose editing career included contributions to The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, the editing of the Adams Family Papers, and publishing The Letters of Benjamin Rush. Princeton University Press is a leader in the field that has embraced the world of digital scholarship while continuing to support book editions.

The award was presented by last year’s winner, Roger Bruns, and accepted on behalf of the Press by Barbara Oberg, General Editor Emerita of The Jefferson Papers. Bruns’ comments follow:

One scholar wrote of the Jefferson edition, “…, the ever-increasing attention over the years to thorough translation of multiple languages and powerful, thoughtfully chosen illustrations make for a stimulating and more comprehensive reading experience. Precision is the hallmark of the Princeton University Press. Quality, durability, and consistency frame the content––matching the degree of adoration that the historical Jefferson himself brought to his books and papers.” The Press has published sixty volumes of the Jefferson Papers in three series and throughout this time its commitment to the best standards has never wavered.

The contributions of Princeton University Press to historical documentary editing go far beyond the Jefferson Papers. The Press published all sixty-nine volumes of The Papers of Woodrow Wilson, edited by Arthur Link. It also published both volumes of the Letters of Benjamin Rush in 1951 and both volumes of the Political Correspondence and Public Papers of Aaron Burr in 1983.

But historical projects are certainly not the only beneficiaries of this commitment to scholarly publishing. Just listen to the some of the multitude of subjects, the unprecedented list of individual whose papers the Press has, with precision and efficiency, published in the last few decades. It has published collected works of Carl Jung, Kierkegaard’s Writings, a critical edition of W. H. Auden, Collected Writings of Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and The Writings of Henry David Thoreau.

It has published the Collected Works of Paul Valery; the Collected Works of Goethe; editions of Erich Neumann and St. John Perse, The Collected Dialogues of Plato, and the Complete Works of Aristotle. I’m surprised that the Press has not published the secret diaries of King Tut.

This record represents a remarkable dedication to a broad and deep presentation of important contributions to literature, classicism, history, poetry, science, and music. When you stop and think about the breadth and amount of scholarship it seems, it is, astonishing.

In addition to this remarkable publishing legacy, the Press also entered into a unique collaboration with Hebrew University of Jerusalem in co-sponsoring a scholarly edition of The Collected Papers of Albert Einstein. The project has published fourteen volumes to date, with each volume appearing first with the documents in their original language and then reissued in English translation.

 

Peter Dougherty, the director of Princeton University Press adds, “For my colleagues at PUP and for the editors of our documentary book projects, we are honored to receive the 2017 Lyman H. Butterfield Award and thrilled that our long-time publishing partner and dear friend Barbara Oberg [has accepted] it for us.

The award is timely because it recognizes Peter’s distinguished leadership of the Press for more than a decade. He is stepping down as director later this year.

TigerTalks discuss Princeton faculty ‘Breakthrough Books’

Last month, we partnered with the Princeton Entrepreneurship Council on a TigerTalk in the New York City, featuring four PUP authors—Dalton Conley, Sir Angus Deaton, Nancy Malkiel, and Alexander Todorov—to highlight their ‘breakthrough books.’ The series brings Princeton authors to New York, connecting their ideas and their scholarship with new readers. One takeaway from the event came during the Q&A portion:

[O]ne audience member observed that inequality in one form or another seemed to be a recurring theme in each of the panelists’ research. From economic and educational inequities to genetic and physiognomic disparities, “Inequality is going to be on our agenda forever,” Deaton remarked. But the innovative insights in these books have the potential to inspire “risk-taking actions and value-creating organizations” from the ranks of entrepreneurs across the globe, who will hopefully develop solutions that continue to propel humanity forward.

To learn more about the event, the participants, and their books, visit the Princeton University website.

Conley

The Genome Factor
Dalton Conley & Jason Fletcher

Deaton

The Great Escape
Sir Angus Deaton

Malkiel

“Keep the Damned Women Out”
Nancy Malkiel

Face Value

Face Value
Alexander Todorov

“The Woodstock of the Mind” Celebrates 30 Years

By Katie Lewis

Nestled among lush-green rolling hills, just on the Welsh side of the Anglo-Welsh border, lies the beautiful sleepy town of Hay-on-Wye (or Y Gelli, to use its Welsh name). With over two dozen bookshops to serve fewer than 2000 permanent residents, Hay has long been known as “the town of books”, and by the late 1970s, became the world’s first official Book Town. A great venue, then, for Britain’s biggest and most famous literary festival. Founded around a kitchen table in 1987, Hay Festival has grown from an exciting idea to a world-class event, drawing writers, actors, artists, politicians, philosophers, scientists, comedians, musicians and crowds numbering 250,000 people, from across the globe. Called “the Woodstock of the mind” by Bill Clinton when he spoke at Hay in 2001, Hay Festival has become a highlight of the literary calendar for many; indeed, the late Tony Benn said that “in my mind it’s replaced Christmas”.

Hay Festival 2017 gets underway. Photo by Mogan Selvakannu

Hay Festival always feels special, but this year there was a buzz in the air, as Hay celebrated its 30th year with a superb line-up of speakers. These included: Bernie Sanders, Eddie Izzard, Jaqueline Wilson, Nick Clegg, Helen Fielding, Victoria Hislop, Jeremy Paxman, Stephen Fry, Peter Singer, Tom Daley, Graham Norton, Simon Schama, Nadya Tolokno (of Pussy Riot), Robert Winston, Colm Tóibín, Tom Hollander, Juliet Stevenson, Tony Robinson, Gillian Tett, Tracey Emin, Martin Rees, Harriet Harman, Tracy Chevalier, Rowan Williams, Paul Cartledge, Neil Gaiman, Richard E. Grant, Germaine Greer, Michael Parkinson, Will Young, Jeremy Bowen, George Monbiot, Will Self, A. C. Grayling, Jim Al-Khalili, Ian Rankin, Michael Sheen, Simon Armitage, John Simpson, Bill Bailey, and many more.

Princeton University Press is proud to be part of Hay Festival each year, and this year we had a wonderful group of authors speaking on a fascinating range of subjects:

Robbert Dijkgraaf, Director of the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton and author of The Usefulness of Useless Knowledge, spoke about one of the great paradoxes of scientific research: the search for answers to deep questions, motivated solely by curiosity and without concern for applications, often leads not only to the greatest scientific discoveries but also to the most revolutionary technological breakthroughs. Dijkgraaf’s charisma and humour shone through as he made his large audience laugh with a video of the world’s first robot and reminded us that “without Einstein’s theory, your GPS would be 7 miles out. So, I like to say that without Einstein, we would all be lost”. Dijkgraaf also recorded a special episode of BBC Radio 4’s programme “Inside Science” in front of a live audience at Hay. You can listen again here.

Speaking on a subject of macabre topicality, Gilles Kepel, author of Terror in France: The Rise of Jihad in the West, discussed the topic of his book in relation to Europe as a whole, and the events in Manchester on 22nd May in particular.

Kevin Laland, biologist and author of Darwin’s Unfinished Symphony: How Culture Made the Human Mind gave a fascinating talk highlighting the uniqueness of the human species, and what sets us apart from other animals. He argued that it was the complexity and diversity of human culture that has caused human beings to evolve, and that the success of the human species is down to a ‘whirlpool’ of evolutionary feedback and cultural processes. In other words, human beings are creatures of their own making.

Kevin N. Laland. Photo by Sam J. Peat

Alexander Todorov, author of Face Value: The Irresistible Influence of First Impressions enthralled his audience of almost 2000 people with his digitally constructed images of faces showing characteristics that the human brain (often incorrectly) perceives to denote different personality traits upon first meeting. Did you know that our brains make judgements about a person’s trustworthiness, competence, dominance and other traits within 1/10th of a second? Definitely food for thought…

Roger Penrose, renowned physicist and author of Fashion, Faith, and Fantasy in the New Physics of the Universe did an ‘In Conversation’ event with Marcus du Sautoy. Marcus told us all that Roger was one of his childhood heroes and remembered having heard him lecture in his school days. Their conversation ranged across string theory, dark matter, black holes and sparked some excellent questions from the audience.

Roger Penrose. Photo by Mogan Selvakannu

Finally, Lawrence Bee, author of Britain’s Spiders: A Field Guide, delighted arachnophiles of all ages in his talk on how to recognise some of the 670 species of spiders living in your British back garden. He also brought some live spiders with him on stage, which the audience were able to get a closer look at during his book signing!

Lawrence Bee. Photo by Liam Webb

Hay Festival really is the thinking person’s paradise. Some years, the grass quads swarm with sunbathing readers or people dozing in deck chairs between talks; some years, wellington boots become not just a festival fashion item, but a necessity. But, rain or shine, Hay Festival has a certain magic that’s hard to describe. It’s a bit like the thrill of walking into a great bookshop and finding the authors of a whole host of wonderful books inside, waiting to welcome you and introduce you to the characters and ideas within their pages.

Clips and full talks from Hay Festival 2017 can be viewed on the BBC’s Hay Festival webpage.

Katie Lewis has been a publicist at Princeton University Press’s European office, near Oxford, since 2009.

Christie Henry to become director of Princeton University Press

Christie Henry, editorial director for sciences, social sciences and reference at the University of Chicago Press, will become director of the Princeton University Press effective Sept. 1.

Henry will succeed Peter Dougherty, who has been director of the Princeton University Press since 2005 and will retire as of the end of this year.

“Princeton University Press has been astonishingly fortunate in its directors, from its first, Whitney Darrow, to its most recent, Peter Dougherty,” said W. Drake McFeely, chairman of the Press’ board of trustees and president and chairman of W.W. Norton & Co.

“Christie Henry was selected from a formidably strong group of candidates and we have every expectation that she will continue the tradition of bold, creative and intelligent leadership from which the Press has benefited for more than a hundred years.”

Jill Dolan, Princeton’s dean of the college, a member of the Press’ board and chair of the search committee, said she was “delighted by Christie Henry’s historic appointment as the first woman to direct PUP. Her superb editorial skills, combined with her savvy sense of the industry and her keen commitment to team-building and collaboration make her the perfect choice to lead the Press into its next era.

“Christie will build on the Peter Dougherty’s legacy and inspire the Press staff and its authors toward innovation and new heights of excellence,” Dolan said. “I so look forward to seeing how Christie will shape the Press’ contribution to knowledge.”

Henry joined the University of Chicago Press as an editorial assistant in 1993 and has risen through the ranks as an editorial associate, assistant editor, editor, senior editor and executive editor. In 2008 she was appointed to her current role as editorial director, in which she manages the acquisitions programs and staff for life science and science studies; economics, political science and law; and reference, which includes the print and digital versions of The Chicago Manual of Style.

She represents the Press at publishing and science meetings and conventions across the world, including the Frankfurt Book Fair, London Book Fair, Book Expo America, Association of American University Presses and the National Association of Science Writers.

“Princeton University Press has been an inspiration to me for the entirety of my publishing career and my life as a reader,” Henry said. “Bound into its imprint is a known excellence that sets standards in all niches of the publishing ecosystem, and which is owed to a staff and to authors of incredible creativity and talent. Its global reach and editorial vibrancy, animated by Peter Dougherty’s leadership and the collaboration with the University and the Press Board, have flourished these last 12 years.”

Prior to the Press, Henry was an editorial assistant from 1991 to 1993 at the Chicago Tribune. She is a graduate of Dartmouth College and has a certificate in leadership strategies for book publishing from the Yale Publishing Program.

A leading publisher of scholarly books since 1905, Princeton University Press publishes about 230 titles a year in the humanities, social sciences and physical sciences. It is headquartered in Princeton with offices in Oxford, England.

The Press is an independent publisher with close formal and informal connections to Princeton University. The Board of Trustees consists of seventeen members, eleven of which must have a Princeton University connection, among them a five member editorial board which makes the final decisions about which books will bear the Press’ imprint.

“The privilege of leading the PUP team in its ongoing evolution and successful adaptation to our dynamic publishing environment is profoundly exciting to me, and I eagerly await the opportunities as well as life within the Princeton community,” Henry said.

Photo credit: Laura S. Coe

Christie Henry to be next director of Princeton University Press

We are delighted to announce the appointment of Christie Henry as the next director of Princeton University Press, effective early this September.  Ms. Henry, an alumna of Dartmouth College, is Editorial Director for the Sciences, Social Sciences, and Reference at the University of Chicago Press, where she has worked since 1993 mainly acquiring books in the life sciences.  On behalf of her new colleagues at PUP, we extend the warmest congratulations and best wishes to Christie and her family as we look forward to welcoming them to Princeton.     

Hay Festival: A Literary Vacation

Hay Festival is an annual literature festival that takes place in Hay-on-Wye in Wales. In 2001, Bill Clinton described it as, “the Woodstock of the mind.” This year, Hay Festival takes place 25 May – 4 June, bringing writers and readers together to share stories and ideas in events that inspire, examine, and entertain. Here at PUP, we’re looking forward to seeing many of our highly celebrated authors participate in lectures and panel discussions. Get your tickets here.

Peter Singer
Ethics in the Real World
Saturday, 27 May 2017 2:30pm

Singer

Robbert Dijkgraaf
The Usefulness of Useless Knowledge
Saturday, 27 May 2017 5:30pm

Dijkgraaf

Gilles Kepel
Terror in France
Sunday, 28 May 2017 1:00pm

Kepel

Kevin Laland
Darwin’s Unfinished Symphony
Tuesday, 30 May 2017 2:30pm

Laland

Alexander Todorov
Face Value
Tuesday, 30 May 2017 4pm

Todorov

Lawrence Bee
Britain’s Spiders
Wednesday, 31 May 2017 4pm

Bee

Roger Penrose
Fashion, Faith, and Fantasy in the New Physics of the Universe
Thursday, 1 June 2017 5:30pm

Penrose