More chances to win bird ebooks!

Congratulations to the winners of our bird ebooks giveaway

Thank you to everyone who entered our giveaway for 6 digital copies of our best-selling and most popular bird books. We had such a wonderful response, I decided to pick two winners. Congratulations to Gaurav Kandlikar and Jill Clark who are now owners of an enviable birding library on their handheld devices!

Gaurav noted this was a “nice way to start the week,” and we agree! But the best comment goes to Jill who compared winning our giveaway to winning the Powerball lottery — well, she called it a close second.

I am also pleased to announce another natural history title is now available in the iBooks store: Rare Birds of North America by Steve Howell, Ian Lewington, and Will Russell

Please become a fan of Princeton University Press on our social media sites or subscribe to this blog to receive news of forthcoming giveaways like this!

Princeton University Press on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PrincetonUniversityPress

Princeton University Press on Twitter: https://twitter.com/princetonupress

 

Win 6 Great Bird Ebooks from Princeton University Press

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To celebrate the availability of Princeton University Press’s bird books through the iBooks store, we are hosting a sweepstakes giveaway of all 6 titles. See below for several ways to enter or send an email to blog@press.princeton.edu.

The prize will be 6 promo codes that allow the winner to download complimentary copies of The Crossley ID Guide, The Warbler Guide, The World’s Rarest Birds, Hawks at a Distance, The Birds of Peru, and The Unfeathered Bird. This prize can only be used through the iBooks store and to view these books, you must have an iOS device with iBooks 3 or later and iOS 4.3 or later, or a Mac with iBooks 1.0 or later and OS X 10.9 or later. There is no device or tablet included in this giveaway.

The giveaway will run from 12:15 AM EST, Monday, February 3 through 12:00 PM EST, Friday, February 7.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Broadwing Hawks are on the move this week through Mid-Atlantic region

One of my favorite raptor sites, Hawk Mountain in Kempton PA, is seeing a steady stream of migrating Broadwing Hawks, so I thought I’d share this gorgeous plate from The Crossley ID Guide: Raptors. Hoping to make it there soon. Do you have a local hawk watch? Give them a shout out in the comments below and I’ll add them to the “places” list below.

 

Broad-wing Hawk - Adult

Places to go see raptors this fall:

Hawk Mountain Sanctuary

http://www.hawkmountain.org/

1700 Hawk Mountain Rd.
Kempton, PA 19529

 

 

Using radar and weather to predict bird fall out during migration season, a quick case study from Derek Lovitch

I am crossposting this from Derek Lovitch’s blog. He has had two amazing days watching migrating birds (a complete list of his sightings is available on his blog, so if you want to be struck with true envy over an amazing tally, head there), but what really interests me and is useful to our migration feature this month, is how he uses radar and maps to predict what birds he’ll see and where to find them. So, I have left the bird list alone and present here the meat and potatoes of his post. I hope it helps everyone understand the power of using weather/radar/maps during migration time:

 

Simply put: wow!  That was one heck of a flight on Day 1.  In fact, it was downright overwhelming at times – flocks of flickers, waves of warblers, packs of waxwings.  It was almost too much to count, and thankfully, Jenny Howard agreed (OK, so maybe I didn’t exactly ask, but beg) to tally flickers for the busiest part of the morning for me. That helped a whole lot.

After a flood like the morning of Day 1, I am not disappointed by the slow, but steady trickle through the point this morning on Day 2.  It was a more manageable number to count, with quite a few birds lower than yesterday, and often only a few at a time; it was easier to sort through.

I’ll admit, I wasn’t expecting Day 2 to be quite this good.  And despite really only a “good” flight, parulas had their second highest tally – I didn’t think there would be any left after yesterday’s flight!  And yes, this more manageable flight was more “enjoyable,” if considerably less awe-inspiring.

So, what made me have lower expectations for today?  Let’s go to the radar!

First, the massive flight overnight Monday into Tuesday that led to all of the records yesterday.  I have included the 10pm, 12am, 2am, and 4am radar and velocity images:
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Combined, these images show a very strong flight all night long, with a lot of birds offshore come twilight, and likely a lot of birds arriving at the coast come dawn.  Looking at that image when I went to bed, and when I awoke, coupled with the light northwesterly winds all night left no doubt that things would be hopping at Sandy Point.  And, as we now know, there most certainly was. If you see a radar image that looks like this – go birding in the morning!

In fact, it was a good day all-around for migrants, and everywhere we looked up yesterday, raptors were on the move.

winds, 110am,9-17-13

Now, let’s take a look a the radar and velocity images from 10pm, 12am, 2am, and 4am last night:
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As night fell Tuesday night (Day 1, ed note), clear and mostly calm conditions let birds take to the air once again – but not nearly as many as the night before (pre-Day 1). Notice how much smaller the area of return is, and how much less dense? Meanwhile, the velocity image was much less distinctly fast-moving, north-to-south as the previous night (of course, with little to no wind, the ground speed of the birds would be less anyway) – a little more ambiguous than the night before.  Furthermore, with a forecast for westerly winds (not as good as northwesterly), and the chance that they would become southwesterly by dawn, I did consider skipping Sandy Point this morning, but with the rest of the week looking even less productive, I knew I had to give it a go.

And, obviously, I am glad that I did.  But upon returning to the store, and checking those above radar images once again, I find it a bit odd that the radar image (small in diameter, but very dense) did not translate to a more distinct velocity image.  Perhaps there was a lot of slow-moving stuff up there (insects, pollen, dust, etc) that clouded the motion of the birds.  Either way, it was a good night for flying, and if it’s a good night for flying, it’s a good morning to be at Sandy Point!

 

j9671[1]Derek Lovitch has worked on avian research and education projects throughout the United States, has written numerous articles for birding publications, and was a columnist for Birding magazine. He now owns and runs Freeport Wild Bird Supply in Maine. He is also author of How to Be a Better Birder which you can check out here.

Migration Sweepstakes — enter to win everything you need to make the most of Fall birdwatching!

To kick off our Migration blog coverage, we’re taking to the skies with a Rafflecopter giveaway event!

Our prize package includes a copy of The Warbler Guide, The Crossley ID Guide: Raptors, and How to Be a Better Birder, a pair of Zeiss TERRA binoculars, and the audio companion for The Warbler Guide.

How to win? There are numerous ways to win, including liking any of the three books Facebook pages, emailing us at blog@press.princeton.edu, signing up for our email alerts for Bird and Natural History Titles at http://press.princeton.edu/subscribe/,or tweeting at @PrincetonNature or at any of the author’s Twitter pages (@IDCrossleyGuide or @The WarblerGuide). Just follow the steps in the Rafflecopter box below. The winner will be selected at the beginning of October.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Two for Tuesday – Britain’s Freshwater Fishes & England’s Rare Mosses

From our WildGuides selection, we are introducing two new beautifully illustrated books for your personal library.

j9973Britain’s Freshwater Fishes
by Mark Everard

Britain hosts a diversity of freshwater environments, from torrential hill streams and lowland rivers to lakes, reservoirs, ponds, canals, ditches, and upper reaches of estuaries. Britain’s Freshwater Fishes covers the 53 species of freshwater and brackish water fishes that are native or have been introduced and become naturalized. This beautifully illustrated guide features high-quality in-the-water or on-the-bank photographs throughout. Detailed species accounts describe the key identification features and provide information on status, size and weight, habitat, ecology, and conservation. Written in an accessible style, the book also contains introductory sections on fish biology, fish habitats, how to identify fishes, and conservation and legislation.

 

 

 

j9975England’s Rare Mosses and Liverworts:
Their History, Ecology, and Conservation
by Ron D. Porley

This is the first book to cover England’s rare and threatened mosses and liverworts, collectively known as bryophytes. As a group, they are the most ancient land plants and occupy a unique position in the colonization of the Earth by plant life. However, many are at risk from habitat loss, pollution, climate change, and other factors. Britain is one of the world’s best bryologically recorded areas, yet its mosses and liverworts are not well known outside a small band of experts. This has meant that conservation action has tended to lag behind that of more charismatic groups such as birds and mammals. Of the 918 different types of bryophyte in England, 87 are on the British Red List and are regarded as threatened under the strict criteria of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature.

This book aims to raise awareness by providing stunning photographs–many never before published–of each threatened species, as well as up-to-date profiles of 84 of them, including status, distribution, history, and conservation measures. The book looks at what bryophytes are, why they are important and useful, and what makes them rare; it also examines threats, extinctions, ex situ conservation techniques, legislation, and the impact of the 1992 Convention on Biological Diversity.

For more selections from WildGuides, please visit:
http://press.princeton.edu/wildguides/

This Week’s Book Giveaway

Last week, Princeton University Press announced the acquisition of the WILDGuides natural history list and the formation of our new imprint: Princeton WILDGuides. This week, we’re giving you the opportunity to win one of the great books in Princeton WILDGuides as part of this week’s book giveaway!

The Jewel Hunter
Chris Gooddie

A tale of one man’s obsession with rainforest jewels, this is the story of an impossible dream: a quest to see every one of the world’s most elusive avian gems—a group of birds known as pittas—in a single year.

Insightful, compelling, and laugh-out-loud funny, this is more than a book about birds. It’s a true story detailing the lengths to which a man will go to escape his midlife crisis. A travelogue with a difference, it follows a journey from the suburban straitjacket of High Wycombe to the steamy, leech-infested rainforests of remotest Asia, Africa, and Australia.

Dangerous situations, personal traumas, and logistical nightmares threaten The Jewel Hunter’s progress. Will venomous snakes or razor-clawed bears intervene? Or will running out of fuel mid-Pacific ultimately sink the mission? The race is on. . . .

If you’ve ever yearned to escape your day job, wondered what makes men tick, or simply puzzled over how to make a truly world-class cup of tea, this is a book for you.

To learn more and see a complete list of books in Princeton WILDGuides please visit:
http://press.princeton.edu/wildguides/

The random draw for this book will be Friday 4/20 at 3pm EST. Be sure to like us on Facebook if you haven’t already to be entered to win!

Announcing a new imprint: Princeton WILDGuides

 

Learn more and see a complete list of books: http://press.princeton.edu/wildguides/

 

April 2012 — Princeton University Press, a leading publisher of natural history titles, is pleased to announce the acquisition of the WILDGuides natural history list and the formation of a new imprint: Princeton WILDGuides.

 

 

“The WILDGuides imprint at PUP will fit into a program dedicated to natural history titles, and already published through series like Princeton Pocket Guides and Princeton Field Guides.”–Publishers Weekly

Princeton, NJ – (April 12, 2012) — In recent years, Princeton University Press and UK-based publisher WILDGuides co-published several titles including Nightjars of the World by Nigel Cleere and Antarctic Wildlife by James Lowen. Under the new agreement, Princeton University Press acquires rights to the WILDGuides existing catalog of books including The Jewel Hunter by Chris Gooddie and authoritative British guides like Britain’s Dragonflies by Dave Smallshire & Andy Swash, Britain’s Orchids by David Lang, and Britain’s Reptiles and Amphibians by Howard Inns. Princeton University Press also reserves the right to publish all new WILDGuides acquisitions as part of the Princeton WILDGuides imprint.

“We are thrilled to partner with Princeton University Press because they share the same aspirations to produce the highest quality natural history guides available,” noted Andy Swash, Managing Director of WILDGuides, Ltd.

Princeton University Press has a long tradition of natural history publishing including popular series like Princeton Field Guides, Princeton Illustrated Checklists, and Princeton Pocket Guides, as well as award-winning bird books The Crossley ID Guide: Eastern Birds and Avian Architecture. As Princeton University Press’s Group Publisher for Science and Reference Robert Kirk noted, this acquisition positions Princeton University Press as the leading international publisher of natural history titles.

“This partnership will allow us to both expand our footprint in the UK and continental Europe and to embark on ambitious co-development of projects on a global basis,” said Kirk. “It will also introduce readers around the world to a wide range of practical, up-to-the-minute field guides and manuals, reference works, and the best in broad natural history titles.”

Princeton WILDGuides books will be available worldwide via Princeton University Press’s networks sales representatives and distributed through California-Princeton Fulfillment Services in the United States; John Wiley & Sons Ltd in the UK; United Publishers Services in Japan; and Footprint Books in Australia.

About Princeton University Press
Founded in 1905, Princeton University Press is an independent publisher with close connections, both formal and informal, to Princeton University. The fundamental mission of the Press is to disseminate scholarship both within academia and to society at large. The Press seeks to publish the innovative works of the greatest minds in academia across a range of disciplines including economics, mathematics, natural history, philosophy, art and literature, law, political science, religion, and history.
http://press.princeton.edu

About WILDGuides, Ltd
WILDGuides was created in 2000 as a not-for-profit publishing organization with a commitment to supporting wildlife conservation. Over the years, in conjunction with Governmental and Non-Governmental conservation organizations, WILDGuides has produced a series of definitive yet simple-to-use photographic guides to Britain’s wildlife. We have also published field guides and visitor’s guides to a wide range of wildlife hotspots around the world. More recently, we have embarked upon a series of photographic guides to the bird families of the world in partnership with Princeton University Press in the USA. Profits from the sale of our publications go towards supporting a range of conservation charities worldwide.
http://www.wildguides.co.uk/index.php

 


The official press release is available for download here as a PDF.