What do you think? Are Gayborhoods going the way of the dodo?

Slate just posted a provocative video that draws on information and data from There Goes the Gayborhood? by Amin Ghaziani. Demographic data shows that gayborhoods are de-gaying, but does this spell the end of The Castro, Boystown, and the Village?

 


Read more:

bookjacket There Goes the Gayborhood?
Amin Ghaziani

The End of Civilization (In the Bronze Age) on Crash Course

The Crash Course series by John and Hank Green posted an episode on the collapse of the Bronze Age Civilization. Watch the video below and if you would like to learn more about this period in history we encourage you to read 1177 BC by Eric Cline. It has been our best-selling book for months in print, ebook, and even audio formats. Enjoy!

About this episode: Crash Course In which John Green teaches you about the Bronze Age civilization in what we today call the middle east, and how the vast, interconnected civilization that encompassed Egypt, The Levant, and Mesopotamia came to an end. What’s that you say? There was no such civilization? Your word against ours. John will argue that through a complex network of trade and alliances, there was a loosely confederated and relatively continuous civilization in the region. Why it all fell apart was a mystery. Was it the invasion of the Sea People? An earthquake storm? Or just a general collapse, to which complex systems are prone? We’ll look into a few of these possibilities. As usual with Crash Course, we may not come up with a definitive answer, but it sure is a lot of fun to think about.


Read more:

bookjacket 1177 B.C.
The Year Civilization Collapsed
Eric H. Cline

Throwback Thursday #TBT: Richard D. McKinzie’s The New Deal for Artists (1973)

McKinzie, The New Deal for Artists

Hello again, folks! It’s time for another installment of Throwback Thursday! On this week’s #TBT, we’ll be discussing The New Deal for Artists by Richard D. McKinzie.

As for the rest of America, the Great Depression proved to be a trying time for America’s artists. Great innovators like Willem de Koonig, Arshille Gorky, Jackson Pollock, and Adolf Gottlieb found themselves producing rather conventional work under the patronage of the Roosevelt administration, struggling to maintain their integrity and stay afloat financially. This book traces the struggles, triumphs, and setbacks of America’s Depression-era artists under New Deal policies as they navigated through the worst economic turmoil the country has ever faced.

We hope you’ve enjoyed this edition of #TBT! Don’t forget to check out next week’s installment!

Book trailer for Atlas of Cities edited by Paul Knox


Princeton University Press senior designer Jason Alejandro created this book trailer for Atlas of Cities edited by Paul Knox. (The catchy song in the background is the aptly named “Weekend in the City” by Silent Partner.)

8-7 Atlas of Cities Atlas of Cities
Edited by Paul Knox

 

Amazon beauty tips for “clean and glossy” skin

Amazon Beauty Face Mask Recipe

Shopping list:
Cypress
Cedar
Frankincense

Oh, and you will need one of these.

mortar-and-pestle-301801_1280
“The women make a mixture of cypress, cedar, and frankincense. They pound these ingredients into a paste on a rough stone, adding a little water. When this substance takes on a smooth, thick consistency, they cover their faces, and indeed their whole bodies, with the paste and retire for the night. When they remove the plaster on the next morning, comments Herodotus, a sweet odor is imparted to them and their skin is clean and glossy.”

Read more about the ablutions of the Amazons at Wonders and Marvels: http://www.wondersandmarvels.com/2014/09/beauty-secrets-of-the-ancient-amazons.html

And while you’re there, enter to win a copy of The Amazons: Lives and Legends of Warrior Women across the Ancient World by Adrienne Mayor.

Throwback Thursday #TBT: Donald G. Mathews’s Slavery and Methodism: A Chapter in American Morality, 1780-1945 (1965)

Matthews, Slavery and Methodism - A Chapter in American Morality

Hello again, folks! It’s time for this week’s edition of Throwback Thursday! On this #TBT, we’re showcasing Donald G. Mathews’s Slavery and Methodism: A Chapter in American Morality, 1780-1845.

A 1780 conference of Methodist ministers identified slavery as an evil that went against humanity, God, and nature. When the Methodist Episcopal Church was officially organized in America four years later, it required its members to free their slaves or leave the congregation. But the church soon softened its stance; although slavery remained frowned upon, the church allowed the practice and set their own regulations in order to maintain their influence over white and black followers of the church and hold the institution together. Slavery and Methodism examines the six decades of religious turbulence that followed as the Methodist church struggled to maintain a precarious balance.

Called “essential reading for all students of American culture” by Choice, Mathews’s book is an illuminating read for anyone interested in Southern history and emancipation.

See you next Thursday!

 

 

Throwback Thursday #TBT: Gary Marker’s Publishing, Printing, and the Origins of Intellectual Life in Russia, 1700-1800 (1985)

 

Welcome to another edition of Throwback Thursday! On today’s #TBT, we’re taking a look at Gary Marker’s Publishing, Printing, and the Origins of Intellectual Life in Russia, 1700-1800Originally published in 1985, this book is just one of the many classics recently resurrected by the Princeton Legacy Library. Here’s a little more information about it:

Gary Marker describes the pursuit of an effective public voice by political, Church, and literary elites in Russia as synonymous with the struggle to control the printed media, showing that Russian publishing and printing evolved in a way that sharply diverged from Western experiences but that proved to be highly significant for Russian society.

We’ve hope you’ve enjoyed this installment of Throwback Thursday. See you next week!

The Future Library Project 2114

Yes, you read that right, the year is 2114 and perhaps one of our authors will be invited to participate–who knows?

The Future Library intends to gather 100 major writings from 100 influential writers over the next 100 years to create a “library” of books. Margaret Atwood is the first of 100 writers who will each contribute a text, and she has already begun writing. She plans to complete the book in May 2015, but then the manuscript will be held unread for 100 years, until the final publication of the anthology of texts in 2114. The coordinators of the Future Library also intend to grow the trees upon which the anthology will eventually be printed (good to know they are optimistic about the prospect of print and paper books in the 22nd century!).

The first writer to contribute to Katie Paterson’s Future Library – a new public artwork that will unfold in the city of Oslo, Norway over the next 100 years – is prizewinning author, poet, essayist and environmentalist Margaret Atwood.

Atwood is the first of 100 writers who will each contribute a text to Future Library over the next 100 years. The Canadian author has begun to write her text, which she will gift to Future Library in May 2015, whereupon it will be held unread for 100 years, until the final publication of the anthology of texts in 2114. A thousand trees have been planted in Nordmarka, a forest just outside Oslo. In 2114, the trees will be cut down to provide the paper for the anthology of books. Visitors to the forest can experience the slow growth of the trees, inch-by-inch, year-by-year.

Conceived by Katie Paterson, Future Library is produced by Situations as part of Slow Space, a public art programme for Bjørvika, commissioned by Bjørvika Utvikling and managed by the Future Library Trust. Supported by the City of Oslo, Agency for Cultural Affairs and Agency for Urban Environment.

Details here: http://www.situations.org.uk/margaret-atwood-first-writer-contribute-future-library/

 

In this video, Future Library visionary Katie Paterson speaks with Margaret Atwood:

Margaret Atwood – the first writer for Future Library from Katie Paterson on Vimeo.

I hope my great (or is that great-great?) grandchildren are as appreciative upon the completion of this innovative publishing project as I am at the start.

Two new exhibits about Albert Einstein on Google Cultural Institute

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Two new, expertly written and illustrated exhibits about Albert Einstein are now available for free on Google Cultural Institute. These archives feature information from the Einstein Papers Project and the Hebrew University archives.

Einstein’s Trip to the Far East and Palestine

In late 1922 and early 1923, Albert Einstein embarked on a five-and-a-half-month trip to the Far East, Palestine, and Spain. In September 1921, Einstein had been invited by the progressive Japanese journal Kaizo to embark on a lecture tour of Japan.   The tour would include a scientific lecture series to be delivered in Tokyo, and six popular lectures to be delivered in several other Japanese cities. An honorarium of 2,000 pounds sterling was offered and accepted.

Einstein’s motivation for accepting the invitation to Japan was threefold: to fulfil his long-term desire to visit the Far East, to enjoy two long sea voyages “far from the madding crowds” and to escape from Berlin for several months in the wake of the recent assassination of Germany’s Foreign Minister Walther Rathenau, who had belonged to Einstein’s circle of friends. Rathenau had been gunned down by anti-Semitic right-wing extremists in June 1922 and there was reason to believe that Einstein’s life was also at risk.

Credit: Einstein’s Trip to the Far East and Palestine

Albert Einstein German, Swiss and American?

In a letter to his superiors, the German ambassador, Constantin von Neurath, quotes from a Copenhagen newspaper: „Although a Swiss subject by birth and supposedly of Jewish origin, Einstein’s work is nevertheless an integral part of German research“.

Von Neurath uses this flawed statement with good reason: The  Swiss Jew whom he would rather disregard, unfortunately proves to be one of the few “Germans” welcome abroad.

On April 26, 1920, for example, Albert Einstein was nominated member of the  Royal Danish Academy of Sciences and Letters.

The more appreciated Einstein becomes abroad, the greater Germany’s desire to claim him as one of their own.

Credit: Albert Einstein German, Swiss and American?

On the occasion of these exhibits, Diana K. Buchwald of the Einstein Papers Project at California Institute of Technology said, “The Einstein cultural exhibit gives us a splendid glimpse into rare documents and images that tell not only the story of Einstein’s extraordinary voyage to publicize relativity in Japan in 1922, and to lay the cornerstone of the Hebrew University in Palestine in 1923, but also the dramatic trajectory of his entire life, illustrated by his colorful passports that bear testimony to the vagaries of his personal life.”

Prof. Hanoch Gutfreund, Former President, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Chair of the Albert Einstein Archives echoed her Buchwald’s enthusiasm noting, “The cooperation between the Google Cultural Institute, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and the Einstein Papers Project in Caltech has produced two exhibitions exploring two specific topics on Einstein’s life and personality. Thus, Google has provided an arena, accessible to all mankind, which allows the Hebrew University to share with the general public the highlights of one of its most important cultural assets–the Albert Einstein Archives, which shed light on Einstein’s scientific work, public activities and personal life.

Learn more about Princeton University Press’s Einstein-related books, including the print editions of the Einstein Papers Project, here.

 

 

Throwback Thursday #TBT: Maria Martha Makela’s The Munich Secession: Art and Artists in Turn-of-the-Century Munich (1990)

Makela, The Munich Secession - Art and Artists

Welcome to another installment of Throwback Thursday! On this #TBT, we’re honoring Maria Martha Makela’s The Munich Secession: Art and Artists in Turn-of-the-Century Munich, another fascinating cultural study recently reissued as part of the Princeton Legacy Library series. Here’s a little bit about Makela’s book:

In April 1892 the first art Secession in the German-speaking countries came into being in Munich, Central Europe’s undisputed capital of the visual arts. Featuring the work of German painters, sculptors, and designers, as well as that of vanguard artists from around the world, the Munich Secession was a progressive force in the German art world for nearly a decade, its exhibitions regularly attended and praised by Paul Klee, Wassily Kandinsky, and other modernists at the outset of their careers.

Peter Paret of The Art Bulletin called Makela’s book “the first thoroughly documented account of the Munich Secession in any language.” Anyone with an interest in turn-of-the-century European art is sure to find this study to their liking.

Until next Thursday!

Congratulations to Derek Sayer, author of Prague, Capital of the Twentieth Century

Prague, Capital of the Twentieth Century: A Surrealist History by Derek Sayer has received a special mention for the 2014 F. X. Šalda Prize.

This prize is awarded annually by the Institute for Czech Literature of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Czech Republic, for “exceptional contribution to art history/criticism.” What is particularly notable and particularly worth celebrating is that this special mention for Prague is the first time a foreign-language book has been honored in 17 years of the award!

Congratulations, indeed!


 

bookjacket Prague, Capital of the Twentieth Century:
A Surrealist History
Derek Sayer

This book was also previously selected by the Financial Times (FT.com) as one of the Best History Books of 2013

Book Trailer for The Amazons by Adrienne Mayor


bookjacket The Amazons
Lives and Legends of Warrior Women across the Ancient World
Adrienne Mayor