Derek Sayer’s Prague, winner of 2014 George L. Mosse Prize, American Historical Association

pragueThe American Historical Association recently announced its 2014 prize winners, and congratulations are in order (again) for Derek Sayer and his book Prague, Capital of the Twentieth Century: A Surrealist History. 

Prague will be the recipient of the George L. Mosse Prize, an award given to “an outstanding major work of extraordinary scholarly distinction, creativity, and originality in the intellectual and cultural history of Europe since 1500.” The award ceremony will be held at AHA’s Annual Meeting in New York on Friday, January 2nd.

For the full list of 2014 prize winners, click here. Again, congratulations to Derek Sayer on yet another noteworthy (and blog worthy) achievement!

Derek Sayer’s Prague receives honorable mention for the 2014 Wayne S. Vucinich Book Prize

pragueThe Wayne S. Vucinich Book Prize is awarded to the “most important contribution to Russian, Eurasian, and East European studies in any discipline in the humanities or social sciences,” by The Association for Slavic, Eastern European, and Eurasian Studies (ASEEES).

This year, Derek Sayer, author of Prague, Capital of the Twentieth Century: A Surrealist History, received an honorable mention for the award, along with Valerie Kivelson for her book Desperate Magic: The Moral Economy of Witchcraft in Seventeenth-Century Russia (Cornell University Press). Kate Brown and Plutopia: Nuclear Families, Atomic Cities, and the Great Soviet and American Plutonium Disasters (Oxford University Press) took home first place.

For the list of winners and honorable mentions for other ASEEES awards, click here. Congratulations to Derek Sayer on the noteworthy achievement!

Princeton University Press and Places Journal Launch Places Books

Princeton, NJ, October 8, 2014 – Princeton University Press and Places Journal are excited to announce a new series: Places Books. The series will present smart, lively, peer-reviewed titles on architecture, landscape, and urbanism that are characterized by strong narrative, provocative argument, and engaging prose. Featuring the work of emerging and established scholars alike, Places Books will offer readers a range of the best contemporary writing on the built environment.

Places Books

Interested readers can sign up for a newsletter to learn more about forthcoming books in the series.

Edited by Nancy Levinson and Josh Wallaert and published by Princeton University Press, the books will be developed from Places articles and expanded into compact and accessible paperbacks and e-books with the aim of inciting dialogue across disciplines. According to Nancy Levinson, Editor and Executive Director of Places Journal, “We are thrilled to be collaborating with Princeton University Press. Places Books is an exciting opportunity to bring the very best public scholarship in design to a wider readership.”

The collaboration was conceived as an alternative to lengthy and heavily illustrated scholarly studies in art, architecture, and urbanism. Though the volumes will feature sophisticated design, lavish production values will be set aside to ensure that Places Books are affordable for a wide range of readers. The subjects of the series will be more timely and topical than authors would take on in traditional monographic projects, but investigated at greater length than in journal articles.

Places Books will launch with two titles. Where are the Women Architects?, by architectural historian Despina Stratigakos, will be an insightful exploration of why women have historically been underrepresented in architecture and what’s being done to rectify the imbalance. D.J. Waldie’s The Poetics of Suburbia will use photography and text to establish a new vocabulary for how suburban spaces are discussed, represented, and experienced. According to Michelle Komie, Executive Editor for Art and Architecture at Princeton University Press, “We want Places Books to influence a wider cultural conversation. Our goal is large: to reinvigorate the tradition of the public intellectual in architecture and urbanism.”

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About Places Journal

Places is a leading journal of contemporary architecture, landscape, and urbanism, dedicated to harnessing the moral and investigative power of ambitious public scholarship to promote equitable cities and sustainable landscapes. Founded in 1983 by faculty at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the University of California, Berkeley, Places was a print journal for twenty-five years before moving fully online in 2009. Places is supported by an international network of academic partners as well as institutional and individual donors, whose collective engagement ensures that the journal’s rich and substantial content remains publicly accessible and free of charge.

About Princeton University Press

Princeton University Press is an independent publisher with close connections, both formal and informal, to Princeton University. As such it has overlapping responsibilities to the University, the academic community, and the reading public. Our fundamental mission is to disseminate scholarship (through print and digital media) both within academia and to society at large.

Contact:

Julia Haav, Senior Publicist, Princeton University Press

Nancy Levinson, Editor and Executive Director, Places Journal

 

 

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Throwback Thursday #TBT: Richard D. McKinzie’s The New Deal for Artists (1973)

McKinzie, The New Deal for Artists

Hello again, folks! It’s time for another installment of Throwback Thursday! On this week’s #TBT, we’ll be discussing The New Deal for Artists by Richard D. McKinzie.

As for the rest of America, the Great Depression proved to be a trying time for America’s artists. Great innovators like Willem de Koonig, Arshille Gorky, Jackson Pollock, and Adolf Gottlieb found themselves producing rather conventional work under the patronage of the Roosevelt administration, struggling to maintain their integrity and stay afloat financially. This book traces the struggles, triumphs, and setbacks of America’s Depression-era artists under New Deal policies as they navigated through the worst economic turmoil the country has ever faced.

We hope you’ve enjoyed this edition of #TBT! Don’t forget to check out next week’s installment!

Book trailer for Atlas of Cities edited by Paul Knox


Princeton University Press senior designer Jason Alejandro created this book trailer for Atlas of Cities edited by Paul Knox. (The catchy song in the background is the aptly named “Weekend in the City” by Silent Partner.)

8-7 Atlas of Cities Atlas of Cities
Edited by Paul Knox

 

#StoryTime with Bill T. Jones — #155

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j10299[1]Click the image above to read Story #155 from Bill T. Jones’s Story/Time: The Life of an Idea.

#StoryTime with Bill T. Jones — #176

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j10299[1]Click the image above to read Story #176 from Bill T. Jones’s Story/Time: The Life of an Idea.

Throwback Thursday #TBT: Maria Martha Makela’s The Munich Secession: Art and Artists in Turn-of-the-Century Munich (1990)

Makela, The Munich Secession - Art and Artists

Welcome to another installment of Throwback Thursday! On this #TBT, we’re honoring Maria Martha Makela’s The Munich Secession: Art and Artists in Turn-of-the-Century Munich, another fascinating cultural study recently reissued as part of the Princeton Legacy Library series. Here’s a little bit about Makela’s book:

In April 1892 the first art Secession in the German-speaking countries came into being in Munich, Central Europe’s undisputed capital of the visual arts. Featuring the work of German painters, sculptors, and designers, as well as that of vanguard artists from around the world, the Munich Secession was a progressive force in the German art world for nearly a decade, its exhibitions regularly attended and praised by Paul Klee, Wassily Kandinsky, and other modernists at the outset of their careers.

Peter Paret of The Art Bulletin called Makela’s book “the first thoroughly documented account of the Munich Secession in any language.” Anyone with an interest in turn-of-the-century European art is sure to find this study to their liking.

Until next Thursday!

#StoryTime with Bill T. Jones — #125

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j10299[1]Click the image above to read Story #125 from Bill T. Jones’s Story/Time: The Life of an Idea.

#StoryTime with Bill T. Jones — #159

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j10299[1]Click the image above to read Story #159 from Bill T. Jones’s Story/Time: The Life of an Idea.

Throwback Thursday #TBT: Erwin Goodenough’s Jewish Symbols in the Greco-Roman Period (1992)


Throwback Thursday: Week 3


Goodenough, Jewish Symbols in the Greco-Roman Period

It’s Thursday again, folks, and you know what that means: time for a Throwback (#TBT)! This week’s #TBT honors Erwin Goodenough’s Jewish Symbols in the Greco-Roman Period (1992), another fundamental text found in the Princeton Legacy Library. Here’s a little bit of information on your favorite relic – both a literal and figurative designation, in this case:

This volume presents the most important portions of Erwin Goodenough’s classic thirteen-volume work, a magisterial attempt to encompass human spiritual history in general through the study of Jewish symbols in particular. Revealing that the Jewish religion of the period was much more varied and complex than the extant Talmudic literature would lead us to believe, Goodenough offered evidence for the existence of a Hellenistic-Jewish mystic mythology far closer to the Qabbalah than to rabbinical Judaism.

David M. Hay of Studia Philonia Annual 1 praises the volume, saying that, “[s]ince [Jacob Neusner's one-volume abridgement] presents the fruits of Goodenough’s decades-long study of ancient Jewish art, climaxed by his study of the third-century synagogue at Dura-Europas, it is probably the best introduction to Goodenough’s mature thought. Neusner contributes a twenty-nine-page foreword that explains the enduring importance of the entire thirteen-volume work.”

And if we’ve peaked your interest with this book, you can find similar materials over in Mythos: The Princeton/Bollingen Series in World Mythology. We hope you’ve enjoyed this edition of Throwback Thursday (#TBT), and we’ll see you next week!

Katrina van Grouw & Unfeathered Friends featured on BBC Springwatch Unsprung

Sorry for the poor quality of this video, but it’s worth watching!

For more of Katrina’s Unfeathered Birds, please visit our slideshow of images from her book:

Capture

And if you wish to see Katrina’s art in person, you might like to attend this exhibition of her drawings at Buckinghamshire County Museum through September 27, 2014.

bookjacket

The Unfeathered Bird
Katrina van Grouw

Third Place for the 2013 BB/BTO Best Bird Book of the Year, British Birds and the British Trust for Ornithology
Honorable Mention for the 2013 PROSE Award in Biological Sciences, Association of American Publishers

Hardcover | 2013 | $49.95 / £34.95 | ISBN: 9780691151342