#StoryTime with Bill T. Jones — #155

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j10299[1]Click the image above to read Story #155 from Bill T. Jones’s Story/Time: The Life of an Idea.

10 interesting facts about bees

8-7 Bee BookWhen I was asked to write a post about bees, I felt a lump the size of a honeycomb rise in my throat. I thought to myself,  “Bees? Like the things that ruined my 8th birthday party or every trip I’ve ever taken to Rita’s Ices? Those things?!” Yes, those things, but amazingly enough, after reading through Noah Wilson-Rich’s new book The Bee: A Natural History, I can honestly say my opinion of bees has changed, for the better. Here are 10 interesting facts about bees that will hopefully either solidify your love of these insects or foster a new appreciation for them.

1. Thousands of years ago, bees evolved from carnivores to herbivores. Maybe this explains my initial irrational fear of them!

2. There are over 20,000 species of bees who are classified in nine families and further divided by short, medium, and long tongues.

The Bee: A Natural History, Pg. 67

3. Bees can see ultra violet rays. They see the world primarily in purples and blues.

4. Bees have just ten receptors for taste, but 163 receptors for smell.

5. Honey bees communicate via dancing. The Round dance communicates the nearby presence of food. The Waggle dance is used to communicate the location of a food source more than 165ft away from the hive. The direction, distance, and quality of the food is made known through the Waggle. If a threat is detected near the food, another bee will interrupt the dancing bee with a head-butt.

6. In 2000, honey bees provided an estimated $14.6 billion to the US economy.

Pg. 49

7. Only female bees sting.

8. Queen bees and worker bees share the same genes, the only difference is future queen bees are given extra rations of royal jelly.

9. Bees pollinate over 130 fruits and vegetables.

10. Flowering plants developed attractive, scented, and brightly colored flowers once bees changed their foraging preference from animal protein to a vegetarian lifestyle.

A tale of three cities…or the There Goes the Neighborhood? book tour so far

As anyone who works in publishing or who has authored a book can tell you–book tours are hit or miss. Fortunately, for one recently published author–Amin Ghaziani, author of There Goes the Gayborhood?–his book tour has landed firmly at the hit end of the spectrum. Here are some photos from the road and a list of forthcoming tour stops.

San Francisco! Where it all began with a standing-room only event at The Green Arcade.

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Chicago! Much of the research for There Goes the Gayborhood? was conducted in Chicago, so it was fitting for Amin to have an event at Unabridged Bookstore. The homecoming feel of this event was cemented by the appearance of a special guest of honor for the evening–Amin’s mother!

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Vancouver! University of British Columbia and the Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies launched the Ideas Lunch & Wine Bar with a tip-toe standing-room only event for Amin.

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Amin has several more events planned in the coming months, so make sure you get these dates in your calendar:

  • October 2: New York (Special Event at the Center for Lesbian and Gay Studies)
  • October 23: Vancouver (Little Sisters bookstore, Vancouver)
  • December 12: Seattle (Eliott Bay Book Company, Seattle)

 


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There Goes the Gayborhood?
Amin Ghaziani

Throwback Thursday #TBT: Gary Marker’s Publishing, Printing, and the Origins of Intellectual Life in Russia, 1700-1800 (1985)

 

Welcome to another edition of Throwback Thursday! On today’s #TBT, we’re taking a look at Gary Marker’s Publishing, Printing, and the Origins of Intellectual Life in Russia, 1700-1800Originally published in 1985, this book is just one of the many classics recently resurrected by the Princeton Legacy Library. Here’s a little more information about it:

Gary Marker describes the pursuit of an effective public voice by political, Church, and literary elites in Russia as synonymous with the struggle to control the printed media, showing that Russian publishing and printing evolved in a way that sharply diverged from Western experiences but that proved to be highly significant for Russian society.

We’ve hope you’ve enjoyed this installment of Throwback Thursday. See you next week!

The Future Library Project 2114

Yes, you read that right, the year is 2114 and perhaps one of our authors will be invited to participate–who knows?

The Future Library intends to gather 100 major writings from 100 influential writers over the next 100 years to create a “library” of books. Margaret Atwood is the first of 100 writers who will each contribute a text, and she has already begun writing. She plans to complete the book in May 2015, but then the manuscript will be held unread for 100 years, until the final publication of the anthology of texts in 2114. The coordinators of the Future Library also intend to grow the trees upon which the anthology will eventually be printed (good to know they are optimistic about the prospect of print and paper books in the 22nd century!).

The first writer to contribute to Katie Paterson’s Future Library – a new public artwork that will unfold in the city of Oslo, Norway over the next 100 years – is prizewinning author, poet, essayist and environmentalist Margaret Atwood.

Atwood is the first of 100 writers who will each contribute a text to Future Library over the next 100 years. The Canadian author has begun to write her text, which she will gift to Future Library in May 2015, whereupon it will be held unread for 100 years, until the final publication of the anthology of texts in 2114. A thousand trees have been planted in Nordmarka, a forest just outside Oslo. In 2114, the trees will be cut down to provide the paper for the anthology of books. Visitors to the forest can experience the slow growth of the trees, inch-by-inch, year-by-year.

Conceived by Katie Paterson, Future Library is produced by Situations as part of Slow Space, a public art programme for Bjørvika, commissioned by Bjørvika Utvikling and managed by the Future Library Trust. Supported by the City of Oslo, Agency for Cultural Affairs and Agency for Urban Environment.

Details here: http://www.situations.org.uk/margaret-atwood-first-writer-contribute-future-library/

 

In this video, Future Library visionary Katie Paterson speaks with Margaret Atwood:

Margaret Atwood – the first writer for Future Library from Katie Paterson on Vimeo.

I hope my great (or is that great-great?) grandchildren are as appreciative upon the completion of this innovative publishing project as I am at the start.

Two new exhibits about Albert Einstein on Google Cultural Institute

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Two new, expertly written and illustrated exhibits about Albert Einstein are now available for free on Google Cultural Institute. These archives feature information from the Einstein Papers Project and the Hebrew University archives.

Einstein’s Trip to the Far East and Palestine

In late 1922 and early 1923, Albert Einstein embarked on a five-and-a-half-month trip to the Far East, Palestine, and Spain. In September 1921, Einstein had been invited by the progressive Japanese journal Kaizo to embark on a lecture tour of Japan.   The tour would include a scientific lecture series to be delivered in Tokyo, and six popular lectures to be delivered in several other Japanese cities. An honorarium of 2,000 pounds sterling was offered and accepted.

Einstein’s motivation for accepting the invitation to Japan was threefold: to fulfil his long-term desire to visit the Far East, to enjoy two long sea voyages “far from the madding crowds” and to escape from Berlin for several months in the wake of the recent assassination of Germany’s Foreign Minister Walther Rathenau, who had belonged to Einstein’s circle of friends. Rathenau had been gunned down by anti-Semitic right-wing extremists in June 1922 and there was reason to believe that Einstein’s life was also at risk.

Credit: Einstein’s Trip to the Far East and Palestine

Albert Einstein German, Swiss and American?

In a letter to his superiors, the German ambassador, Constantin von Neurath, quotes from a Copenhagen newspaper: „Although a Swiss subject by birth and supposedly of Jewish origin, Einstein’s work is nevertheless an integral part of German research“.

Von Neurath uses this flawed statement with good reason: The  Swiss Jew whom he would rather disregard, unfortunately proves to be one of the few “Germans” welcome abroad.

On April 26, 1920, for example, Albert Einstein was nominated member of the  Royal Danish Academy of Sciences and Letters.

The more appreciated Einstein becomes abroad, the greater Germany’s desire to claim him as one of their own.

Credit: Albert Einstein German, Swiss and American?

On the occasion of these exhibits, Diana K. Buchwald of the Einstein Papers Project at California Institute of Technology said, “The Einstein cultural exhibit gives us a splendid glimpse into rare documents and images that tell not only the story of Einstein’s extraordinary voyage to publicize relativity in Japan in 1922, and to lay the cornerstone of the Hebrew University in Palestine in 1923, but also the dramatic trajectory of his entire life, illustrated by his colorful passports that bear testimony to the vagaries of his personal life.”

Prof. Hanoch Gutfreund, Former President, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Chair of the Albert Einstein Archives echoed her Buchwald’s enthusiasm noting, “The cooperation between the Google Cultural Institute, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and the Einstein Papers Project in Caltech has produced two exhibitions exploring two specific topics on Einstein’s life and personality. Thus, Google has provided an arena, accessible to all mankind, which allows the Hebrew University to share with the general public the highlights of one of its most important cultural assets–the Albert Einstein Archives, which shed light on Einstein’s scientific work, public activities and personal life.

Learn more about Princeton University Press’s Einstein-related books, including the print editions of the Einstein Papers Project, here.

 

 

#StoryTime with Bill T. Jones — #176

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j10299[1]Click the image above to read Story #176 from Bill T. Jones’s Story/Time: The Life of an Idea.

PUP News of the World — September 5, 2014

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Each week we post a round-up of some of our most exciting national and international PUP book coverage. Reviews, interviews, events, articles–this is the spot for coverage of all things “PUP books” that took place in the last week. Enjoy!


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The Passenger Pigeon

This week marked the 100th centennial of the death of the last passenger pigeon, Martha. She was living in the Cincinnati Zoo as the last living member of her species. The Financial Times‘ Matthew Engel commemorates the anniversary in a feature entitled “The extinction of the passenger pigeon.” Engel writes:

No one knows when the last great auk died. Or the last dodo. But the last passenger pigeon’s death can be dated more or less exactly: the afternoon of September 1 1914. There was something else extraordinary about this extinction. This was not some marginal species, retiring from trying to eke out an existence on a remote island or a lonely mountainside. When the white man arrived in North America, this was almost certainly the most common bird on the continent, quite possibly the most common in the world.

Some calculations suggest there were 3bn to 5bn. Others suggest there could have been up to 3bn in a single flock. This is like the extinction of the house fly. Or of grass. Or, perhaps, of the galumphing, domineering, myopic two-legged mammal whose presence did for the passenger pigeon. As the title of a centenary exhibition at the Smithsonian in Washington has it, Once There Were Billions. And then there were none.

Engel interviews PUP author Errol Fuller in this piece, and Fuller, who is a world authority on bird and animal extinction, has studied the story of Martha’s species extensively. His new book, The Passenger Pigeon, features rare archival images as well as haunting photos of live birds. Fuller shows how widespread deforestation, the demand for cheap and plentiful pigeon meat, and the indiscriminate killing of Passenger Pigeons for sport led to their catastrophic decline. Fuller provides an evocative memorial to a bird species that was once so important to the ecology of North America, and reminds us of just how fragile the natural world can be.

In a review of the book, Adrian Barnett of the New Scientist calls “visually beautiful” and writes that it “gives a fine account of the species, its biology and its demise.”

Preview the Introduction of The Passenger Pigeon.

Philosophy of Biology

Looking for an explanation of the most important topics debated by biologists today? Peter Godfrey-Smith’s Philosophy of Biology is a concise, comprehensive, and accessible introduction to the philosophy of biology written by a leading authority on the subject. The title is reviewed on Forbes.com, and John Farrell argues that “non-specialists should not be put off. Godfrey-Smith’s style is engaging, almost conversational.”

Peter Godfrey-Smith discusses the relation between philosophy and science; examines the role of laws, mechanistic explanation, and idealized models in biological theories; describes evolution by natural selection; and assesses attempts to extend Darwin’s mechanism to explain changes in ideas, culture, and other phenomena. Further topics include functions and teleology, individuality and organisms, species, the tree of life, and human nature.

Authoritative and up-to-date, Philosophy of Biology is an essential guide for anyone interested in the important philosophical issues raised by the biological sciences. Check out Chapter One of The Philosophy of Biology for yourself.

The New York Nobody Knows

Put on your walkin’ shoes — we’re off to explore New York with PUP author, William Helmreich. As a kid growing up in Manhattan, Helmreich played a game with his father they called “Last Stop.” They would pick a subway line and ride it to its final destination, and explore the neighborhood there. Decades later, Helmreich teaches university courses about New York, and his love for exploring the city is as strong as ever.

Putting his feet to the test, he decided that the only way to truly understand New York was to walk virtually every block of all five boroughs–an astonishing 6,000 miles. His epic journey lasted four years and took him to every corner of Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens, the Bronx, and Staten Island. Helmreich spoke with hundreds of New Yorkers from every part of the globe and from every walk of life, including Mayor Michael Bloomberg and former mayors Rudolph Giuliani, David Dinkins, and Edward Koch.

Their stories and his are the subject of his captivating and highly original book, The New York Nobody Knows: Walking 6,000 Miles in the City. The book is reviewed on TravelMag, and reviewer Paul Willis recalls one story of Helmreich’s many stories:

Helmreich, a sociology professor at New York’s City University (CUNY), is at his best when examining these broader demographic trends. He’s less good at giving life to the colour and flavor of the city. A New York native he grew up in Manhattan’s Upper West Side, a relatively privileged neighbourhood that borders Central Park. Maybe it’s this background that gives some of his encounters with new immigrants an awkward quality, such as when he meets a Honduran man waving a flag outside a Lower Manhattan car park to alert drivers that there’s space within and then asks if he can have a go at waving the flag himself.

“’Are you okay?’ he asked, a worried tone creeping into his voice.”

Helmreich reassures the man by telling him it’s alright because he’s a professor.

You don’t need to be a professor — or even leave the comfort of your favorite reading spot — to enjoy the city of New York through The New York Nobody Knows. Truly unforgettable, the book will forever change how you view the world’s greatest city. View Chapter One of The New York Nobody Knows, and tweet us your thoughts using #NYNobodyKnows.

Princeton University Press’s best-sellers for the last week

These are the best-selling books for the past week.

1177 BC: The Year Civilization Collapsed by Eric H. Cline
4-10 Drezner_TheoriesZombies_cvr Theories of International Politics and Zombies by Daniel W. Drezner
The 5 Elements of Effective Thinking by Edward B. Burger & Michael Starbird
The Founder’s Dilemmas: Anticipating and Avoiding the Pitfalls That Can Sink a Startup by Noam Wasserman
Bumble Bees of North America: An Identification Guide by Paul H. Williams, Robbin W. Thorp, Leif L. Richardson & Sheila R. Colla
OnBullshit On Bullshit by Harry G. Frankfurt
RoughCountry Rough Country: How Texas Became America’s Most Powerful Bible-Belt State by Robert Wuthnow
The Banker's New Clothes
The Bankers’ New Clothes: What’s Wrong with Banking and What to Do about It by Anat Admati and Martin Hellwig
Carlson_Tesla jacket
Tesla: Inventor of the Electrical Age by W. Bernard Carlson
The I Ching or Book of Changes edited by Hellmut Wilhelm

Throwback Thursday #TBT: Maria Martha Makela’s The Munich Secession: Art and Artists in Turn-of-the-Century Munich (1990)

Makela, The Munich Secession - Art and Artists

Welcome to another installment of Throwback Thursday! On this #TBT, we’re honoring Maria Martha Makela’s The Munich Secession: Art and Artists in Turn-of-the-Century Munich, another fascinating cultural study recently reissued as part of the Princeton Legacy Library series. Here’s a little bit about Makela’s book:

In April 1892 the first art Secession in the German-speaking countries came into being in Munich, Central Europe’s undisputed capital of the visual arts. Featuring the work of German painters, sculptors, and designers, as well as that of vanguard artists from around the world, the Munich Secession was a progressive force in the German art world for nearly a decade, its exhibitions regularly attended and praised by Paul Klee, Wassily Kandinsky, and other modernists at the outset of their careers.

Peter Paret of The Art Bulletin called Makela’s book “the first thoroughly documented account of the Munich Secession in any language.” Anyone with an interest in turn-of-the-century European art is sure to find this study to their liking.

Until next Thursday!

Congratulations to Derek Sayer, author of Prague, Capital of the Twentieth Century

Prague, Capital of the Twentieth Century: A Surrealist History by Derek Sayer has received a special mention for the 2014 F. X. Šalda Prize.

This prize is awarded annually by the Institute for Czech Literature of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Czech Republic, for “exceptional contribution to art history/criticism.” What is particularly notable and particularly worth celebrating is that this special mention for Prague is the first time a foreign-language book has been honored in 17 years of the award!

Congratulations, indeed!


 

bookjacket Prague, Capital of the Twentieth Century:
A Surrealist History
Derek Sayer

This book was also previously selected by the Financial Times (FT.com) as one of the Best History Books of 2013

#StoryTime with Bill T. Jones — #125

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j10299[1]Click the image above to read Story #125 from Bill T. Jones’s Story/Time: The Life of an Idea.