Hay Festival – A Literary Vacation on the Welsh Border

Hay Festival is truly a highlight in the bookworm’s calendar. On a typical day at Hay, you might spend the morning sipping coffee on a sofa in the café marquee with a newspaper and croissant on your lap, followed by a talk on Shakespeare’s Women, then a journey into the future of science with the Astronomer Royal, Martin Rees, before tripping along to a live lunchtime recording of BBC Radio 3’s The Verb (don’t laugh too loudly or your cackle will be heard by millions!). Over lunch you might catch a glimpse of Stephen Fry walking along in the sunshine, or meet a fellow bumble-bee enthusiast at the next table. Whilst admiring the myriad display of colourful wellies everywhere you look, you rifle through your programme deciding what to go to next. You make a last-minute decision and rush to a talk about homo sapiens, followed by a browse in the books tent and an ice-cream and a read in a deck chair in the sun. Next up, a talk about a better future world and a glimpse at a real page of the Magna Carta, hosted by Stephen Fry and the hilarious Sandi Toksvig, before ending your day dancing at one of the wonderful concerts held in the large Tata Tent.

Hay Festival

Hay Festival gets underway

Princeton University Press has a strong and long-standing relationship with Hay Festival, and we are proud that this year proved to be no exception. Our week was kicked off by the wonderful Beth Shapiro, on the subject of her new book, How to Clone a Mammoth. Is it possible to bring back the mammoth, the dodo, or the sabre-toothed cat? Why would we want to? And, much more importantly, should we? If you’re wishing you could have been there, fear not, as Beth Shapiro gave the same talk at the Royal Institution earlier in the week, and the whole thing can be watched online, here.

Hay Festival Shapiro

Beth Shapiro at Hay Festival

Best-selling Irish novelist Colm Tóibín spoke about his new novel, Nora Webster, and his Princeton book On Elizabeth Bishop at Hay’s opening weekend. Despite covering themes of loss and death that recur in Bishop’s poetry, he had the whole audience of 1100 people roaring with laughter.

Toibin at Hay

Colm Tóibín amusing the crowd at Hay

On Saturday evening, Beth Shapiro and Colm Tóibín were joined by historian Yuval Noah Harari and novelist Owen Sheers to record a live audience programme for Start the Week, to be broadcast on BBC Radio 4. A fascinating discussion encompassing pre-historic animals and humans to 20th century poetry and everything in-between. You can listen to the programme online here.

Toibin on Start the Week

Colm Tóibín on Start the Week

Other Princeton author events, which this Princeton publicist would love to have attended but had to go back to her day job (perhaps I should take a week-long vacation during Hay Festival next year…) were talks on dark matter and dark energy by Katherine Freese, director of Nordita, the Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics and author of The Cosmic Cocktail, and a talk about the process by which artists such as Michelangelo, Dürer, and Titian became early modern celebrities by Maria Loh, author of the beautiful Still Lives.

Who knows who next year will bring to delight the crowds on the Welsh borders. One thing is for sure: it’s worth blocking out your calendar even before you’ve seen the line-up.

Princeton attends Book Expo America 2015

BEA-5.28_ShowFloor1Photo courtesy of Book Expo America.

This week, we packed our books and headed to NYC to take part in Book Expo America. This year, BEA was held in the Javits Center in Manhattan. The event included three days of book signings, author events, and checking out what’s new in the publishing industry. Publishers, booksellers, librarians, retailers, book industry professionals (and fans!) mingled and talked about books–what could be better than a building filled with book lovers?

If you missed BEA this year, don’t worry! You can visit our “digital booth” and page through a few books that we had on display:

 

photo

The Original Folk and Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm: The Complete First Edition
Jacob & Wilhelm Grimm, Translated and edited by Jack Zipes
Illustrated by Andrea Dezsö

Zipes_BrothersGrimm

These fairy tales may not be what you remember from bedtime. This is a translation of the original Grimm fairy tales. The tales, from the 1812 and 1815 editions, are unique—they reflect diverse voices, rooted in oral traditions, that are absent from the Grimms’ later, more embellished collections of tales.

This book has had a big year. It was one of the Independent’s Best Books of 2014 and one of South China Morning Post’s Best Books of 2014. Page through Chapter One here.

 

The Amazons: Lives and Legends of Warrior Women across the Ancient World
Adrienne Mayor

Mayor_TheAmazons

Amazons—fierce warrior women dwelling on the fringes of the known world—were the mythic archenemies of the ancient Greeks.  But just who were these bold barbarian archers on horseback who gloried in fighting, hunting, and sexual freedom? Were Amazons real? In this deeply researched, wide-ranging, and lavishly illustrated book, National Book Award finalist Adrienne Mayor presents the Amazons as they have never been seen before.

View Chapter One for yourself here.

Life’s Engines: How Microbes Made Earth Habitable
Paul G. Falkowski

Falkowski_Life's_S15

 

Paul Falkowski looks “under the hood” of microbes to find the engines of life, the actual working parts that do the biochemical heavy lifting for every living organism on Earth. With insight and humor, he explains how these miniature engines are built—and how they have been appropriated by and assembled like Lego sets within every creature that walks, swims, or flies.

Flip through Chapter One here.

Be sure to peruse our full digital catalogs. Our Fall 2015 list was recently announced!

Come visit us at BookExpo 2015: Booth #1538

Fall 2015 seasonalIt’s a big day for authors, publishers, and the entire publishing industry. Book Expo America begins today at New York City’s Jacob K. Javits Center, where the main exhibit hall opens at 1 pm, and an assortment of conferences, author signings, and other special events will be taking place between today and Friday, May 29. We hope you’ll stop by and see Princeton University Press at booth #1538, and pick up our new Fall 2015 seasonal catalog (you can download it directly to your device here.) We have quite a diverse and impressive lineup this season, with new books from Nobel Prize-winning economists George Akerlof and Robert Shiller, philosopher (and author of #1 New York Times Bestseller, On Bullshit) Harry Frankfurt, economist Robert Gordon, interdisciplinary scholar Lynn Gamwell, architectural historian Neil Levine, and many more. We appreciate the dedicated work of the authors and staff that helped to make this list possible, and can’t wait to share it with you.

You can find out more about purchasing tickets at the BEA website. Hope to see you there!

PUP authors to appear at philosophy and music festival, How the Light Gets In

The world’s largest philosophy and music festival, How The Light Gets In, is back at Hay-on-Wye in Wales on May 21. Over the course of 11 days and 650 events, this year’s theme, “Fantasy and Reality”, will be explored through a variety of creative expression, including poetry, debates, film, and music.  Total Politics calls this festival “Europe’s answer to TED”. This year promises to be extra special: their entire new Riverside site will be home to a special new music venue, The Hat, which will be hosting long-table banquets and parties. You can find the full program here, and be sure to check out the following presentations by Princeton University Press authors:

5/23/15: In Search of the Self, Simon Blackburn, Colin Blakemore, Mary Midgley. Robert Rowland-Smith hosts.

5/24/15: The Really Real, Simon Blackburn, Philip Blond, Myrian Francois-Cerrah. Hilary Lawson hosts.

5/25/15: Vanity Fair, Simon Blackburn, George Galloway, Margaret Heffernan, Suzannah Lipscomb. Ritula Shah hosts.

5/26/15: Your Life in Your Hands, Clare Carlisle, Ann Furedi, John Harris. Afua Hirsch hosts.

5/26/15: In Place of Prejudice, Clare Carlisle, Naomi Goulder, John Harris. Afua Hirsch hosts.

5/26/15: Mind Misreadings, John Harris.

5/27/15: The Future of Money, Nigel Dodd.

5/28/15:Being Free and Making Choices, Nigel Dodd, Elaine Glaser, Julian Le Grand. Jacques Peretti hosts.

5/28/15: How to Be Human, Julian Le Grand, Finn Mackay, Neel Mukherjee. Elaine Glaser hosts.

5/28/15: The Fantasy of Money, Sarah Bird, Nigel Dodd, Kieron O’Hara. Jacques Peretti hosts.

5/28/15: Democracy, Freedom and Choice, Julian Le Grand.

5/31/15: The Infinite Boom, Michael Howard, Ann Petitifor, Robert Shiller. Isabel Hilton hosts.

 

 

 

 

Announcing Beth Shapiro’s “Mammoth” US & UK Book Tour

Hot on the heels of scientists sequencing the full mammoth genome and announcing they had created living elephant cells containing synthesised mammoth DNA, Beth Shapiro, author of How to Clone a Mammoth: The Science of De-extinction, will be touring the US and UK, giving lectures on her book. Save the date for her visit to a town near you, and be sure to check out #MammothMonday blog posts and Chapter 1 of the book. Also, read Shapiro’s terrific piece on “de-extinction” on The Guardian website here.

US Tour:

5/3/15            Skeptics, Pasadena CA
5/4/15            Smithsonian
5/5/15            92nd St. Y
5/5/15            Princeton Public Library
5/6/15            Harvard Book Store
5/7/15            Philadelphia Free Library
5/11/15          Long Now Foundation
5/12/15          Seattle Town Hall/Pac Sci
5/13/15          Powell’s Books
6/25/15          Commonwealth Club

Shapiro Image for blog 3.30.15

UK Tour:

5/19/15        Natural History Museum, Oxford
5/20/15        How to Academy
5/21/15        Royal Institution
5/22/15        Bristol Festival of Ideas
5/23/15        Hay Festival

Beth Shapiro at Kepler’s

Shapiro at Kelper's

Beth Shapiro, author of How to Clone a Mammoth, has begun her book tour across the US and the UK. Last Thursday, April 16, Beth had a wonderful event at Kepler’s Books in Menlo Park, CA, where she gave an overview of her intriguing book and fielded questions from the audience. We are featuring content related to How to Clone a Mammoth every Monday on our blog as part of our #MammothMonday series. Be sure to read the first chapter and pick up a copy of the book.

Kelper's blog 3

Lawrence Stone Lectures with Chris Clark this April

At the end of April, Chris Clark of St. Catharine’s College, University of Cambridge, and author of the international bestseller The Sleepwalkers, is giving the Lawrence Stone Lectures, jointly sponsored by the Princeton History Department’s Shelby Cullom Davis Center and Princeton University Press. The lectures are on Power and Historicity in Germany, 1648-1945. They are open to the public and held at 4:30 pm, 010 E. Pyne, with a reception to follow.

On Tuesday, April 28, “The State Makes History”

On Wednesday, April 29, “The State Confronts History”

On Thursday, April 30, “Nazi Time: The Escape from History”

Check the Davis Center’s website for more information on this lecture series.

Lawrence Stone Lectures

 

Beth Shapiro Talk, Q&A and Book Signing

Shapiro Image for blog 3.30.15

Beth Shapiro, author of How to Clone a Mammoth, will be giving a talk on “Conserving Ecosystems with De-Extinction” on Tuesday, May 12, 2015. This event is presented by Town Hall, Elliot Bay Book Company, and the Pacific Science Center through The Seattle Science Lectures. More information about the event and a link to buy tickets can be found, here.

Katherine Freese, author of “The Cosmic Cocktail,” at the Royal Astronomical Society

Freese RAS talk

Katherine Freese speaking at the Royal Astronomical Society

Only 5 percent of all matter and energy in the cosmos (think plants, animals, planets, the air we breathe) is made up of ordinary atoms. The rest is known as dark matter—it cannot be seen with telescopes, and its precise identity remains unknown. The Cosmic Cocktail is the inside story of the epic quest to identify dark matter and learn what the universe is made of, told by one of today’s foremost pioneers in the study of dark matter, acclaimed theoretical physicist Katherine Freese. Neil deGrasse Tyson calls the book “a gripping first person account of her life as a cosmologist…Part memoir, part tutorial, part social commentary.” It’s the perfect detective story for science geeks.

Freese post-talk

Post-event drinks at the Royal Astronomical Society

This week, Katherine Freese is in the UK talking about her research and the book. On April 8, she gave a talk at the Royal Astronomical Society and then recorded The Forum on the BBC World Service, which was presented by science journalist Quentin Cooper and will be broadcast and available to listen to online later this month.

Freese and Quinton Cooper

Freese and Quentin Cooper

Don’t miss Freese’s upcoming speaking engagements: On April 15th, Freese and PUP author Jacqueline Mitton will be participating in Edinburgh International Science Festival and on April 16th Freese will be speaking at Blackwell’s in Oxford. Freese will be a guest on BBC Radio 4’s Woman’s Hour on April 17th. On May 26th, she will be speaking at Hay Festival, a philosophy and music festival in Hay-on-Wye, (one of the biggest literary festivals in the UK, which was described by Bill Clinton in 2001 as “The Woodstock of the mind”).

Freese recording The Forum at BBC

Freese recording at BBC Broadcasting House

 

The math behind March Madness

It’s almost that time again. The beginning of the March Madness basketball tournament is a few days away, and here at PUP, we cannot wait!

We’re marking our calendars (find the schedule here) and going over our bracketology, with a little help from PUP author Tim Chartier.

To kick off the countdown, we bring you an article from the Post and Courier, who checked in with Dr. Chartier about how numbers can be the best strategy in bracketology.

College basketball fans seeking to cash in on March Madness need to turn on their calculators and turn off their allegiances.

That was the message Dr. Tim Chartier, a math professor at Davidson and published author, brought to cadets at The Citadel on Monday night.

“The biggest mistake people make in bracketology is they go with their heart no matter what the data says,” said Chartier, who has made studying the mathematics of the NCAA basketball tournament part of his students’ course work at Davidson. “They just can’t let a certain team win or they just have to see their team do well.

“It’s hard not to do that, because that is part of the fun.”

Chartier has made it easier for the average fan to use math in filling out their own brackets at the March Mathness website marchmathness.davidson.edu. The site will get a lot of traffic after the NCAA tournament field is announced on March 15.

 

Read the full article on the Post and Courier website.

Dr. Tim Chartier is a numbers guy, and not only during basketball season. He likes to show students how math can apply outside of the classroom. How can reposting on Twitter kill a movie’s opening weekend? How can you use mathematics to find your celebrity look-alike? What is Homer Simpson’s method for disproving Fermat’s Last Theorem? Dr. Chartier explores these and other questions in his book Math Bytes.

(Photo courtesy of Davidson College)

(Photo courtesy of Davidson College)

 

As Dr. Chartier and others gear up for basketball lovers’ favorite time of year, PUP reminds you to mark your calendars for these key dates.

Check back here soon for more hoop scoop!

• Selection Sunday, March 15, ESPN

• First and Second Rounds, March 20, 22 or March 21, 23

• Greensboro Regional, March 27, 29, Greensboro Coliseum (Greensboro, North Carolina)

• Oklahoma City Regional, March 27, 29, Chesapeake Energy Arena (Oklahoma City, Oklahoma)

• Albany Regional, March 28, 30, Times Union Center (Albany, New York)

• Spokane Regional, March 28, 30, Spokane Veterans Memorial Arena (Spokane, Washington)

• National Semifinals, April 5, Amalie Arena (Tampa Bay, Florida)

• Championship Game, April 7, Amalie Arena (Tampa Bay, Florida)

Final stop on the Gayborhood tour- Seattle, Washington

Ghaziani _ Elliott Bay_image

Amin Ghaziani will make his sixth and final stop of his There Goes the Gayborhood tour at Elliot Bay Book Company in Seattle, Washington at 7PM on December 12th. All of Amin’s previous events have been standing-room-only, people-spilling-out-of-the-doors types of events, so arrive early to grab a seat.

More information can be found on Elliot Bay Book Company’s website as December 12th gets closer.

If you’re in the area, be sure to catch this event!

Ai Weiwei exhibition at Blenheim Palace: Our UK publicity assistant investigates!

Visitors can expect to experience something different this autumn at Blenheim Palace. Tradition meets modernity as the 18th century baroque architecture of Blenheim, the birthplace of wartime British Prime Minister Sir Winston Churchill, is host to an exhibition of the artwork of Chinese artist and dissident Ai Weiwei.Ai weiwei sign

This exciting exhibition is especially relevant to Princeton University Press for two reasons: not only is Blenheim Palace a stone’s throw from Princeton University Press’s European office in Woodstock, Oxfordshire, but Princeton University Press published Ai Weiwei’s ‘Little Black Book’, Weiwei-isms, last year.

Weiwei-isms is a collection of quotes demonstrating Ai Weiwei’s thoughts on key aspects of his art, politics and life, carefully selected by Larry Warsh from articles, tweets and interviews.

“Everything is art. Everything is politics.” — Weiwei-isms

Like Weiwei-isms, the exhibition at Blenheim Palace clearly demonstrates Ai Weiwei’s commitment to art as a powerful political statement, as a means of reacting against injustice, and inspiring others to do the same.

Blenheim chandelier“I want people to see their own power.” — Weiwei-isms

This certainly becomes clear as you enter the exhibition. You are given a leaflet which serves as a guide to Ai’s artwork, dispersed throughout the rooms of the palace. Despite this, none of the artwork is signposted and it becomes the visitor’s responsibility to seek it out and take meaning and inspiration from what they see.

The collection brings together pieces created by the artist over the past 30 years. It is especially impressive given that it was curated remotely, Ai Weiwei having been under house arrest since 2011. The old and new are often brought together, with artefacts from the past being reimagined in novel ways. Take, for example, the Han Dynasty vases transformed beyond recognition by car paint or by being ‘rebranded’ with the Coca Cola logo.

Blenheim zodiacHis ‘Circle of Animals/Zodiac Heads’ (2010), previously displayed at a year-long exhibition at Princeton University, is also at Blenheim. This work is an ironic interpretation of the bronze zodiac head statues that were looted from the Emperor’s summer palace (Yuan Ming Yuan) in Beijing in 1860.

Other highlights include ‘He Xie’ (2012), a work comprised of 2,300 porcelain crabs on the floor of the Red Drawing Room (‘He Xie’, meaning ‘river crabs’, puns on the Chinese phrase for ‘harmony’).

While some pieces are the first thing you see when you walk into a room, other pieces are integrated more subtly into the sumptuous interiors of Blenheim Palace. The Wave Plate (2014) is seamlessly integrated into the lavish table decoration as the centrepiece in the Salon, and a pair of handcuffs made of Huali wood (2012) – a reminder of Ai Weiwei’s current situation – placed suggestively on the bed in Churchill’s birth room might escape your attention due to the large number of visitors moving from room to room, all engrossed in the same treasure hunt as you.

Blenheim crabsAll in all, the collaboration between Blenheim Palace and Ai Weiwei really does merit a visit. Ai Weiwei’s work is all the more interesting and thought-provoking for being situated in the context of Blenheim Palace and its grounds.

The exhibition at Blenheim Palace highlights the ‘clash’ of the old and new, which is indeed something that is key to much of Ai Weiwei’s work.

“If a nation cannot face its past, it has no future.” — Weiwei-isms

In years to come, the Ai Weiwei exhibition at Blenheim Palace is sure to become part of the artist’s legacy and a poignant reminder of his struggle for justice and truth.

“The art always wins. Anything can happen to me, but the art will stay.” — Weiwei-isms

The exhibition runs until 14th December.